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Thread: People of the Appennino Parmense/Val Cedra

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    As you could notice, just one of my great-grandparents was born in a supposed isolated area, in the Alps. I have doubts it's really isolated though. I guess it's in fact in a corridor. Anyway, I found a match of my mother who was born close to there, a bit North, and this match is not that different from her, which surprised me a bit, since my mother has just ~25% of DNA from that area. Plus, we couldn't find a common ancestor. The matching is possibly explained by some local substructure.

    Thanks for the videos. Nice to hear your dialects, even if I can't understand them, as expected. People should put subtitles in these videos. ah ah I'm also glad they are not lost, as an important cultural patrimony imo. The chorus was great, btw. I'm just passionate with this kind of folk music, since childhood.
    Here you have some Talian from Serra Gaúcha, in Rio Grande do Sul. The character is "Naneto Pipetta", folkloric in my area. Kind of a buffon. Not sure you'll understand it, but...
    Most of it defeated me. I'd understand a couple of sentences, and then I'd be lost. Are there Portuguese words in it? I think those were the ones which really defeated me, although I used to be able to understand it at one time. That's my problem with languages: I learn them easily, but if I don't use them they slip away.

    In the video from La Spezia, it's a love song, of course. :) They're at work and during lunch they're fooling around with the song.

    They’re singing this dialect song for a friend. The round faced fairer one had to be coached because he isn’t as familiar with it.

    What will it cost you? My life.
    Don't say know, don't say no
    I know she already has another man
    What can I do
    I’m desperate because I want to make love to you
    Tonight, now, Yes
    There’s time to die
    In your arms
    Tomorrow you can forget
    But tonight say yes
    Don’t say no
    Take everything I have
    Tell me yes

    Molto simpatici the Spezzini. It's this I miss most of all, more than the food, more than almost anything except my family: it's the liveliness, the laughter, the teasing of each other, the ability to have fun just "hanging" out together.

    The man from Pontremoli in the Lunigiana is giving a very beautiful and poetic evocation of what it used to be like in his youth: all of them like brothers and sisters, all the contrade, united, the women at the fontana washing the porri, bringing things to be roasted at the big oven, carrying a basket of laundry with one hand and children with the other. How the castle of Piagnaro was the center of their world, the small streets and alleys their playground.

    He so moves his listeners, and especially the woman, that she says it has to be saved somehow, for the people of the town, to memorialize it.
    Last edited by Angela; 18-04-19 at 23:31.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Most of it defeated me. I'd understand a couple of sentences, and then I'd be lost. Are there Portuguese words in it? I think those were the ones which really defeated me, although I used to be able to understand it at one time. That's my problem with languages: I learn them easily, but if I don't use them they slip away.

    In the video from La Spezia, it's a love song, of course. :) They're at work and during lunch they're fooling around with the song.

    They’re singing this dialect song for a friend. The round faced fairer one had to be coached because he isn’t as familiar with it.

    What will it cost you? My life.
    I know she already has another man
    What can I do
    I’m desperate because I want to make love to you
    Tonight, now, Yes
    There’s time to die
    In your arms
    Tomorrow you can forget
    But tonight say yes
    Don’t say no
    Take everything I have
    Tell me yes

    Molto simpatici the Spezzini. It's this I miss most of all, more than the food, more than almost anything except my family: it's the liveliness, the laughter, the teasing of each other, the ability to have fun just "hanging" out together.

    The man from Pontremoli in the Lunigiana is giving a very beautiful and poetic evocation of what it used to be like in his youth: all of them like brothers and sisters, united, the women at the fontana washing the porri, bringing things to be roasted at the big oven, carrying a basket of laundry with one hand and children with the other. How the castle was the center of their world, the small streets and alleys their playground.

    He so moves his listeners, and especially the woman, that she says it has to be saved somehow, for the people of the town, to memorialize it.
    Thanks for the explanations, Angela. I'll watch them again and try to catch something, even if I'm not exactly optimistic. :)

    No, no. Few and isolated portuguese words, like "grama" (grass). The video is from the 80s. The influence of Portuguese was much smaller those times. Since then, the more the time passes, the more fastly Talian changes toward Portuguese imo.
    But it must be said those men in the video are not necessarily full Venetians in ancestry. I guess some of them must have significant Lombard ancestry as well, like the main character himself, if I'm not mistaken. Perhaps there is some minor Lombard influence? Anyway, it's mostly based on Venetian.
    There must be some isolated "islands" of Lombard dialects in South Brazil, non-related to Talian, like this (here I can notice more Portuguese words, but still not that much):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzafreofK-Y
    https://youtu.be/JtJmnDC0yMo

  3. #28
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    It's odd. I don't understand the men supposedly speaking Bergamesco all that well, but I understand both the nonna here and her interviewer quite well, and she's supposedly speaking a Veneto dialect.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gASt0urMNDM

    I saw this video years ago, and saved it. :)


  4. #29
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    Answered in the thread on diaspora. :)

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