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Thread: U3b3 late byzantine found in Troy

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    U3b3 late byzantine found in Troy

    For Maciano who likes the "medical' side

    https://elifesciences.org/content/6/e20983

    Complications that occur during pregnancy, including bacterial infections, have long been a major cause of death for women. Now, Devault, Mortimer et al. have been able to sequence the DNA of bacteria found in tissue collected from a woman buried 800 years ago in a cemetery in Troy. Some of the woman’s tissues had been well preserved because they had calcified (probably as the result of infection), which preserved their structure in a mineralized layer. Two mineralized “nodules” in the body appear to be the remains of abscesses. Some of the human DNA in the nodules came from a male, suggesting that the woman was pregnant with a boy and that the abscesses formed in placental tissue.

    From these data, we reconstructed a human mitochondrial genome at 30.1x unique read depth, the consensus of which belongs to haplotype U3b3. In phylogenetic analyses of the mitogenome from Troy and modern mitogenomes, the Troy sample groups most closely with those from the Caucasus and Middle East, both of which were within the eastern limits of Late Byzantine influence (Figure 1—figure supplement 6).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sile View Post
    For Maciano who likes the "medical' side

    https://elifesciences.org/content/6/e20983

    Complications that occur during pregnancy, including bacterial infections, have long been a major cause of death for women. Now, Devault, Mortimer et al. have been able to sequence the DNA of bacteria found in tissue collected from a woman buried 800 years ago in a cemetery in Troy. Some of the woman’s tissues had been well preserved because they had calcified (probably as the result of infection), which preserved their structure in a mineralized layer. Two mineralized “nodules” in the body appear to be the remains of abscesses. Some of the human DNA in the nodules came from a male, suggesting that the woman was pregnant with a boy and that the abscesses formed in placental tissue.

    From these data, we reconstructed a human mitochondrial genome at 30.1x unique read depth, the consensus of which belongs to haplotype U3b3. In phylogenetic analyses of the mitogenome from Troy and modern mitogenomes, the Troy sample groups most closely with those from the Caucasus and Middle East, both of which were within the eastern limits of Late Byzantine influence (Figure 1—figure supplement 6).
    This is another article about it which just came across my archaeology feed. Nothing different, just a few more details.

    See:
    http://www.archaeology.org/news/5189...aternal-sepsis

    "MADISON, WISCONSIN—An international team of researchers has identified a case of maternal sepsis in a skeleton unearthed near the site of Troy, according to a report in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Henrike Kiesewetter of Tüebingen University found two calcified nodules below the ribs of a woman who died some 800 years ago at about 30 years of age. Kiesewetter sent the nodules to microbiologist Caitlin Pepperell of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who ruled out tuberculosis, and urinary or kidney stones, as possible diagnoses. She found well-preserved bacteria microfossils in the nodules, however, and sent them on to Hendrik Poinar of McMaster University for genetic analysis. Poinar identified Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Gardnerella vaginalis, which may have caused a fatal infection of the placenta, amniotic fluid, and membranes around the woman’s fetus. Pepperell explained that the high levels of calcium flowing through the pregnant woman’s body calcified the bacteria and formed the nodules. She added that this strain of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is usually associated with livestock, and may have been contracted through living in close quarters with animals. “I thought about what a short difficult life it must have been,” Pepperell said."


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