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Thread: Revisiting the subclades of Iron Age & Roman Age British R1b samples

  1. #1
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    3 out of 3 members found this post helpful.

    Revisiting the subclades of Iron Age & Roman Age British R1b samples

    I noticed on Jean Manco's site that new SNPs were available for the Romano-British samples tested by Martiniano 2016 and the Celtic Hinxton genomes tested by Schiffels 2016.

    The six R1b samples from Roman Britain belonged to:

    - R1b-L21>DF63
    - R1b-L21 (not just L11 as previously reported)
    - R1b-U152>L2>FGC22501 (previously reported simply as U152)
    - R1b-U106>Z381>Z305>DF96 (previously reported simply as U106)
    - R1b-U106>Z381>Z305>DF98 (previously reported simply as U106)
    - R1b-DF19 (not just L11 as previously reported).

    DF19 is found in the Czech Republic, Poland, Germany, the Low Countries, France and Britain. Only a few samples have been found in Scandinavia. Its TMRCA is 4400 years, so it is Proto-Celto-Germanic.

    FGC22501 has been found in England, Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany.

    DF96 and DF98 both seem to be subclades of U106 that remained in Germany during the Bronze Age, unlike the large L48 clade which went up to Scandinavia and came back during the Germanic migrations. DF96 in particular isn't found in Scandinavia, and has a distributed limited to Germany, the Benelux and the British Isles. It is therefore not that surprising to find them in Roman Britain, before the Anglo-Saxon invasions. Both DF96 and DF98 could have come with Celtic/Belgic migrations to Britain, perhaps alongside L2>FGC22501.


    The Hinxton 1 and 2 genomes from pre-Roman Cambridgeshire both belong to R1b-L21, including one to DF13.
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    I agree, it's full of sense

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    I noticed on Jean Manco's site that new SNPs were available for the Romano-British samples tested by Martiniano 2016 and the Celtic Hinxton genomes tested by Schiffels 2016.

    The six R1b samples from Roman Britain belonged to:

    - R1b-L21>DF63
    - R1b-L21 (not just L11 as previously reported)
    - R1b-U152>L2>FGC22501 (previously reported simply as U152)
    - R1b-U106>Z381>Z305>DF96 (previously reported simply as U106)
    - R1b-U106>Z381>Z305>DF98 (previously reported simply as U106)
    - R1b-DF19 (not just L11 as previously reported).

    DF19 is found in the Czech Republic, Poland, Germany, the Low Countries, France and Britain. Only a few samples have been found in Scandinavia. Its TMRCA is 4400 years, so it is Proto-Celto-Germanic.

    FGC22501 has been found in England, Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany.

    DF96 and DF98 both seem to be subclades of U106 that remained in Germany during the Bronze Age, unlike the large L48 clade which went up to Scandinavia and came back during the Germanic migrations. DF96 in particular isn't found in Scandinavia, and has a distributed limited to Germany, the Benelux and the British Isles. It is therefore not that surprising to find them in Roman Britain, before the Anglo-Saxon invasions. Both DF96 and DF98 could have come with Celtic/Belgic migrations to Britain, perhaps alongside L2>FGC22501.


    The Hinxton 1 and 2 genomes from pre-Roman Cambridgeshire both belong to R1b-L21, including one to DF13.

    Maciamo,

    Yes what you said concerning DF96 and DF98 and L2 is pretty much the same conclusion Dr. Iain McDonald is coming to in his analysis based on current data. I am personally very interested in the DF98+ sample (6drif-3 from the study) as I share these SNPs with him including several under DF98 - R1b-U106-Z381-Z156-Z304/306-DF98-S1911-S1894/S1900-S4004/FGC14818/FGC14823-FGC14816/FGC14817!

    Cheers!

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