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Thread: Where did H11a come from?

  1. #1
    Regular Member Dibran's Avatar
    Join Date
    25-09-16
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    896

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1a-L1029*
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H11a2*-146+

    Ethnic group
    Albanian/Gheg/Dibran/Okshtun
    Country: United States



    Where did H11a come from?

    Where did the haplogroup originate? I can't really find anything online. Are there deeper subclades? Which peoples carried it in ancient to present?

  2. #2
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
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    Did you even check Eupedia's page on haplogroup H before saying that you didn't find anything online? Here are sentences that mention it, and I think that's quite enough to know its origin (Mesolithic Europeans, later assimilated by Indo-Europeans). mtDNA cannot determine ancestry more recent than that (Bronze Age at best if you have a relatively new deep clade).

    H11a is found across most of northern, central and eastern Europe and in Central Asia. It was also present in Mesolithic Lithuania, Middle Neolithic Germany and Megalithic Spain.

    H11 is found across most of northern, central and eastern Europe, but also in Central Asia, where it might have been propagated by the Indo-European migrations (see below). H11a was identified in a Mesolithic hunter-gatherer from the Narva culture in Lithuania by Mittnik et al. (2017).

    Haplogroups H1, H10 and H11a in particular are far more frequent in Western Europe (Portugal, Spain, France), where paternal lineages also show a much higher percentages of indigenous Mesolithic lineages (I2a1 and I2a2).

    PIE speakers from the Pontic Steppe are known to have possessed quite different maternal lineages from that of Mesolithic and Neolithic Europeans. A few H subclades linked to the R1a populations of Northeast Europe would obviously have been found among Mesolithic Eastern Europeans, like H1b, H1c and H11.

    The Unetice culture, which is thought to mark the arrival of R1b in Central Europe (but overlapping with the previous R1a expansion), had individuals belonging to H2a1a3, H3, H4a1a1a2, H7h, H11a, H82a.
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  3. #3
    Regular Member Dibran's Avatar
    Join Date
    25-09-16
    Posts
    896

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1a-L1029*
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H11a2*-146+

    Ethnic group
    Albanian/Gheg/Dibran/Okshtun
    Country: United States



    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Did you even check Eupedia's page on haplogroup H before saying that you didn't find anything online? Here are sentences that mention it, and I think that's quite enough to know its origin (Mesolithic Europeans, later assimilated by Indo-Europeans). mtDNA cannot determine ancestry more recent than that (Bronze Age at best if you have a relatively new deep clade).

    H11a is found across most of northern, central and eastern Europe and in Central Asia. It was also present in Mesolithic Lithuania, Middle Neolithic Germany and Megalithic Spain.

    H11 is found across most of northern, central and eastern Europe, but also in Central Asia, where it might have been propagated by the Indo-European migrations (see below). H11a was identified in a Mesolithic hunter-gatherer from the Narva culture in Lithuania by Mittnik et al. (2017).

    Haplogroups H1, H10 and H11a in particular are far more frequent in Western Europe (Portugal, Spain, France), where paternal lineages also show a much higher percentages of indigenous Mesolithic lineages (I2a1 and I2a2).

    PIE speakers from the Pontic Steppe are known to have possessed quite different maternal lineages from that of Mesolithic and Neolithic Europeans. A few H subclades linked to the R1a populations of Northeast Europe would obviously have been found among Mesolithic Eastern Europeans, like H1b, H1c and H11.

    The Unetice culture, which is thought to mark the arrival of R1b in Central Europe (but overlapping with the previous R1a expansion), had individuals belonging to H2a1a3, H3, H4a1a1a2, H7h, H11a, H82a.
    I did read that page. Thank you. I was trying to see if there was any other information. Regards.

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