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Thread: The distribution of mtDna H in southern Iberia

  1. #1
    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    The distribution of mtDna H in southern Iberia

    See: Candela Hernandez

    https://bmcgenet.biomedcentral.com/a...863-017-0514-6

    "
    Background

    The structure of haplogroup H reveals significant differences between the western and eastern edges of the Mediterranean, as well as between the northern and southern regions. Human populations along the westernmost Mediterranean coasts, which were settled by individuals from two continents separated by a relatively narrow body of water, show the highest frequencies of mitochondrial haplogroup H. These characteristics permit the analysis of ancient migrations between both shores, which may have occurred via primitive sea crafts and early seafaring. We collected a sample of 750 autochthonous people from the southern Iberian Peninsula (Andalusians from Huelva and Granada provinces). We performed a high-resolution analysis of haplogroup H by control region sequencing and coding SNP screening of the 337 individuals harboring this maternal marker. Our results were compared with those of a wide panel of populations, including individuals from Iberia, the Maghreb, and other regions around the Mediterranean, collected from the literature.

    Results

    Both Andalusian subpopulations showed a typical western European profile for the internal composition of clade H, but eastern Andalusians from Granada also revealed interesting traces from the eastern Mediterranean. The basal nodes of the most frequent H sub-haplogroups, H1 and H3, harbored many individuals of Iberian and Maghrebian origins. Derived haplotypes were found in both regions; haplotypes were shared far more frequently between Andalusia and Morocco than between Andalusia and the rest of the Maghreb. These and previous results indicate intense, ancient and sustained contact among populations on both sides of the Mediterranean.

    Conclusions

    Our genetic data on mtDNA diversity, combined with corresponding archaeological similarities, provide support for arguments favoring prehistoric bonds with a genetic legacy traceable in extant populations. Furthermore, the results presented here indicate that the Strait of Gibraltar and the adjacent Alboran Sea, which have often been assumed to be an insurmountable geographic barrier in prehistory, served as a frequently traveled route between continents."


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  2. #2
    Regular Member kingjohn's Avatar
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    dear angela ,
    thanks for sharing
    where do you think mtdna h3 originated in north west africa or iberia ?
    this paper claim the age of mtdna h3 is older in europe but i am not sure about it
    regards
    adam

  3. #3
    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    I sort of lost interest and stopped reading when I realized that they didn't do full mito sequences on these samples. I'll go back and read it through.

  4. #4
    Regular Member berun's Avatar
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    Most North African H sequences belong
    to sub-Hgs H1 (42%) and H3 (13%) [17]; thus Hg
    H seems to be structured here in much the same way as
    in Iberia. Nevertheless, some surveys [16] have shown
    that great genetic diversity could be hidden in Hg H profiles
    among northern Africans. It has also been assumed
    that a portion of H lineages in the region were transferred
    by a post-glacial wave of expansion from the
    Franco-Cantabrian/Iberian region southward. Thus, a
    detailed analysis of this clade in populations located
    along this supposed migration route is crucial. We
    present here for the first time a comprehensive, highresolution
    phylogenetic portrait of Hg H in Andalusia;
    this region would have been midway between the area of
    departure and the southernmost limit of mitochondrial H
    sequences in North Africa. It is thus possible to explore
    whether the southernmost region of Spain served as a
    stopover for Hg H descendant lineages in their intercontinental
    route or if other maternal genes underwent direct,
    non-mediated migration to North Africa, either through
    the Strait of Gibraltar or the surrounding maritime region.
    A bad start implies a wrong conclusion: Andalusia was peopled by Celtics, Romans, Arabs, Castillians and suffered a mass deportation of Moriscos towards Africa in the XVI-XVII centuries. I don't expect that actual mtDNA will be similar to that of the Mesolithic... the same for Maghrib.

    It's so difficult to contact some historian? (I don't complain about the mean knowledge and logics of the authors as it don't have any profit)
    "What I've seen so far after my entire career chasing Indoeuropeans is that our solutions look tissue thin and our problems still look monumental" J.P.Mallory

    "The ultimate homeland of the group [PIE] that also spread Anatolian languages is less clear." D. Reich

  5. #5
    MarkoZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by berun View Post
    A bad start implies a wrong conclusion: Andalusia was peopled by Celtics, Romans, Arabs, Castillians and suffered a mass deportation of Moriscos towards Africa in the XVI-XVII centuries. I don't expect that actual mtDNA will be similar to that of the Mesolithic... the same for Maghrib.

    It's so difficult to contact some historian? (I don't complain about the mean knowledge and logics of the authors as it don't have any profit)
    There's also the case of ancient Canary islanders having what is likely mtDNA H at fixation frequency. I think it's doubtful that it came with historic movements into Africa.


    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...686?via%3Dihub

  6. #6
    Regular Member berun's Avatar
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    I'm not denying an Iberian > Maghrib paleolithic migration, but the authors have not tried to distinguish recent migrations or common pops (Phoenicians / Carthaginians), slave trade, etc. By the way the Canary Islands were known by the Greeks and Romans and by sure by the Phoenicians, in fact the last ones could be the responsible for the late colonization of such volcanic islands taking people from abroad.

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