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Thread: Rules for cooking pasta

  1. #76
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    chick peas is the yellow ones?
    my favorite with rice,


    soup, and . drrrrrrrrrum MEATBALLS (with no meat)




    that legume is my favorite.
    ΟΘΕΝ ΑΙΔΩΣ OY EINAI
    ΑΤΗ ΛΑΜΒΑΝΕΙΝ ΑΥΤΟΙΣ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yetos View Post
    chick peas is the yellow ones?
    my favorite with rice,


    soup, and . drrrrrrrrrum MEATBALLS (with no meat)




    that legume is my favorite.
    In English they're called garbanzo beans or chick peas. If you like them you'd like the soups with pasta and the salads.


    We even add them to pasta with mussels:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    They're probably most commonly mixed with grains in soups. In eastern Liguria, La Spezia especially, there's an ancient dish called mesciua, meaning mixed, which is just a combination of cooked ceci, farro, an ancient emmer wheat which we still grow, and either borlotti or white beans. The latter are my favorite because they're the creamiest.
    To be honest, I don't love it, because the only flavor comes from the olive oil, a clove or two of garlic and some rosemary, the latter two of which aren't even traditional. It's filling, nutritional, and cheap, though, and was a staple of the peasant diet.



    This is farro or emmer wheat. You could use spelt but it's not the same.



    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Nigella Lawson's take on spaghetti puttanesca. It's pretty straightforward. A lot of her recipes cater to modern British tastes, and so they run to Indian and Thai spices, as well as North African sometimes, but she does do Italian-ish and French-ish dishes as well.


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    These Roman chefs are not happy with the ingredients and techniques used by American and British tv chefs for making that Roman classic: Spaghetti alla Carbonara. :)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnZ_70XyVAk

    I think they'd be happy with this version from Bon Appetit magazine. It uses only the 5 traditional ingredients, and the technique isn't that off. I basically do it this way and it's delicious. She's very good, this young chef.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    These Roman chefs are not happy with the ingredients and techniques used by American and British tv chefs for making that Roman classic: Spaghetti alla Carbonara. :)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnZ_70XyVAk

    I think they'd be happy with this version from Bon Appetit magazine. It uses only the 5 traditional ingredients, and the technique isn't that off. I basically do it this way and it's delicious. She's very good, this young chef.
    I think that Molly added way too much salt in the water, and the hot water that she added later shoud have been boiling or almost. Bucatini are great for Carbonara and Amatriciana too! Mixing pecorino and parmigiano is still better than just pecorino. (Stick just with Parmigiano for Carbonara)


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    Not my taste. Not piquant enough. It was originally just pecorino. They couldn't afford parmigiano.

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    Rules for cooking pasta

    Anthony Bourdain



    Born: June 25, 1956, New York City, NY
    Died: June 8, 2018, Strasbourg, France


    https://www-m.cnn.com/2018/06/08/us/...bit/index.html

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Mathematicians solve age-old spaghetti mystery:


    https://phys.org/news/2018-08-mathem...i-mystery.html

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    I finally learned how to make tomato sauce for pasta. I made it for lobster ravioli, which came out really good.

    This is how I did it:

    1. I chopped half an onion into pieces, and cooked with olive oil in a large pot until it was quasi-translucent.

    2. I used the brand, Cento, because it did not have preservatives. I bought a large can of crushed tomatoes, and a large can of tomato puree. I put in the two with an equal amount of water for each can. This could feed a family, or last you for days.

    3. Then I add a healthy amount of oregano; a chopped garlic clove; some garlic powder; a few thyme leaves; a few chopped up basil leaves; some salt and pepper; a few bay leaves, and a lot of chopped parsley.

    4. I cooked it on medium to low depending on how hot it was getting, and stirred about every 5 mins for a half-hour to 45 minutes.
    Last edited by Jovialis; 23-01-19 at 04:12.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Looks good.

    Since they are Lobster Ravioli I would aim to a milder sauce. :)

    I wouldn’t use the onions, the extra garlic powder (cos of the fresh), the tomato puree (cos of the chopped tomatoes and it would also strengthen the sauce), the basil (Parsley only for this), and lower the amount of oregano.

    Best Enjoyed with a Vino Rosè.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    Looks good.

    Since they are Lobster Ravioli I would aim to a milder sauce. :)

    I wouldn’t use the onions, the extra garlic powder (cos of the fresh), the tomato puree (cos of the chopped tomatoes and it would also strengthen the sauce), the basil (Parsley only for this), and lower the amount of oregano.

    Best Enjoyed with a Vino Rosè.
    I next want to learn how to make braciole, to add to the sauce. Especially the pork skin one:


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post
    I next want to learn how to make braciole, to add to the sauce. Especially the pork skin one:


    The image shows the Braciole on the plate still with the kitchen twine.
    Braciole should never be served with twine or toothpicks.

    I'm not sure but it's probably illegal.

    Remove it after the first or second step of cooking. The Braciole should hold their Shape.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Rule 1 for pizza. Always add ham and pineapple

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    I love this thread. It's bringing out the Italian and Sicilian in me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    The image shows the Braciole on the plate still with the kitchen twine.
    Braciole should never be served with twine or toothpicks.

    I'm not sure but it's probably illegal.

    Remove it after the first or second step of cooking. The Braciole should hold their Shape.
    È vero. My mother used to untwine the bracciole at the table, in the meat plate. And the cotena too (I think that's how it's spelled, the pork skin).

    Meatballs always made with rehydrated stale Italian bread loaf. None of this white bread or breadcrumbs. That's "middigan" as they said. My sister inherited (filched?) my mother's "shcolamaccarone". Yes, Caserta dialect. And we fried leftover MACARONI, not pasta, it's MACARONI!

    It makes ya proud to be Italian.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    I also want to try to make tomato sauce with lobster for fettuccine. It is a simple recipe, but the main thing is to use the taste of the lobsters. As they cook, they will release water from inside of their shells that will give the sauce an excellent flavor. My grandmother used to make it around Easter time.

    This is how I was told it should be done:

    · Add olive oil and 10 garlic cloves to large pot.
    · Add two live lobsters, and cook in pot until they are red.
    · Add 2 or 3 large cans of tomato sauce (Add some water, if lobsters yield too little of their own)
    · Add some salt
    · Cook for 30 minutes

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    After browning the garlic in the olive oil, add about 1 or 2 inches of water and a bit of salt, now add the the Lobster and keep the lid of the pot closed (just in case the Lobster get free and tries to escape. )

    ps not a pretty sight ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post
    I also want to try to make tomato sauce with lobster for fettuccine. It is a simple recipe, but the main thing is to use the taste of the lobsters. As they cook, they will release water from inside of their shells that will give the sauce an excellent flavor. My grandmother used to make it around Easter time.

    This is how I was told it should be done:

    · Add olive oil and 10 garlic cloves to large pot.
    · Add two live lobsters, and cook in pot until they are red.
    · Add 2 or 3 large cans of tomato sauce (Add some water, if lobsters yield too little of their own)
    · Add some salt
    · Cook for 30 minutes


    I made this sauce using two 2lb lobsters for fettuccine, yesterday. It was really delicious! It came out exactly like the way my grandmother does it, which was my goal.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Praise, Ramen!

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    How not to make fettucine alfredo.

    These Italian chefs are not happy with what they see on youtube. I agree with them, as I made clear over a year and a half ago. "Seriously, the only thing I really object to is when people call some cockamamie bastardization of an Italian dish by the traditional name. It gives a totally wrong impression."

    I would have no problem if they just called these concoctions pasta with cream sauce and...

    It makes for fun watching. It's all English subtitled so you understand everything they're saying.


    How to do the real thing...go to 3:17 for the "sauce"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvXz36RFphU


    This was my children's favorite then and now. I buy the fettucine at my local Italian store, which are made by hand, but I also sometimes buy the imported dried variety.

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    2 members found this post helpful.
    Four easy pasta dishes for the first couse of Sunday dinner. Easy they are, but they're also time consuming, and almost all of them use besciamella, so this is heavy, guys. I don't like the sound of the fourth dish at all: not a fan of putting cooked ham and emmenthaler cheese in any pasta.

    On the other hand, to each their own. It does show innovation is continuing. We're not completely mired in the past.


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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Rule 1 always add pineapples on pizza

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    Rule 1 always add pineapples on pizza
    That's a step WAY too far. :)

    Still, it's your taste buds.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Napoli's "Pasta alla Genovese". How it came to be called that I don't know, but the chef is right: it ranks among the best meat sauces EVER.

    This is the only video I could find that was in English. There's not even any with English subtitles.

    Just a few corrections because I just had to... Nonna Anna only used yellow onions. The chuck was the closest she could find to the cuts of meats she wanted, but she always chose ones with more fat. Instead of pancetta she used lard, which was the closest she could come here to strutto. She didn't at all hold with browning the meat all at once. It just boils. Do it in batches. No marjoram and especially no cayenne pepper. She also used a bit of tomato paste although the traditional recipe doesn't include it. His end product is much too watery; he should have boiled it down.

    Yes, it has to simmer for 8-10 hours, but you're not doing anything to it except stirring occasionally, so you just do it when you're going to be home all day. Serve it the next day. It's even better when it sits for a day or two in the refrigerator.

    This is all about how you make something delicious out of very poor, cheap ingredients.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Nigella Lawson's take on spaghetti puttanesca. It's pretty straightforward. A lot of her recipes cater to modern British tastes, and so they run to Indian and Thai spices, as well as North African sometimes, but she does do Italian-ish and French-ish dishes as well.

    I make a pretty decent salmon puttanesca.

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    Today's primo piatto. Almost one day for the filling, a full day for the dough and making them, and for making the broth.

    It's just the first course.

    It's all I made, though, except for putting together the antipasto.

    Still, I'm exhaused, and, to be fair, I'm in a bit of a food coma. No one is allowed to ask me for anything for the rest of the day.

    Whenever I hear foreigners say Italian food is so quick and simple I want to give them a schiaffo right across the face.


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