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Thread: Upcoming paper on Bronze Age Canaanites

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    we found that the Megiddo samples can be modeled as a mixture of earlier samples from the Levant and Iran, the latter possibly representing migration via Armenia.
    This is a very interesting statement. Megiddo is in Northern Israel, not very far from the archaeological site of Khirbet Kerak, a bronze age site on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. This site is thought to be a Levantine extension of the Kura-Araxes culture, which was centered in the Armenian highland.

    Does anyone know if his paper will include Y haplogroups in the samepls from Megiddo? I postulate that this "Armenian" Kura-Araxes migration they refer to is responsible for bringing J2, R-L277, and R-L584 into the Levant. Would be interesting to see what they find.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eblashko View Post
    This is a very interesting statement. Megiddo is in Northern Israel, not very far from the archaeological site of Khirbet Kerak, a bronze age site on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. This site is thought to be a Levantine extension of the Kura-Araxes culture, which was centered in the Armenian highland.

    Does anyone know if his paper will include Y haplogroups in the samepls from Megiddo? I postulate that this "Armenian" Kura-Araxes migration they refer to is responsible for bringing J2, R-L277, and R-L584 into the Levant. Would be interesting to see what they find.
    I sure hope so. I can't wait for it to be published.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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    Quote Originally Posted by eblashko View Post
    This is a very interesting statement. Megiddo is in Northern Israel, not very far from the archaeological site of Khirbet Kerak, a bronze age site on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. This site is thought to be a Levantine extension of the Kura-Araxes culture, which was centered in the Armenian highland.
    Does anyone know if his paper will include Y haplogroups in the samepls from Megiddo? I postulate that this "Armenian" Kura-Araxes migration they refer to is responsible for bringing J2, R-L277, and R-L584 into the Levant. Would be interesting to see what they find.
    Yes, and it is exactly the time for Hurrian migrations to Canaan, perhaps they introduced the Khirbet Kerak ware.

    I'll also add R1a-F1345 to the possible Y-dna lineages associated with them.

    I don't think The Mitanni and the chieftains of Canaan mentioned in the Amarna letters migrated from central Asia to the Levant, but rather from Armenia, that might explain their relationship with the Hurrians, and it is consistent with this paper's modelling of the Megiddo population.

    I also noticed that this is the third time I'm posting the same stuff, sorry

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    Of course, the Kura Araxes samples we have are "L", though, which is interesting. Maybe with more some J2 will show up.

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    Were the Jebusites Hurrians ?

    The Hebrew Bible contains the only surviving ancient text known to use the term Jebusite to describe the pre-Israelite inhabitants of Jerusalem; according to the Table of Nations at Genesis 10, the Jebusites are identified as a Canaanite tribe, which is listed in third place among the Canaanite groups, between the biblical Hittites and the Amorites. Prior to modern archaeological studies, most biblical scholars held the opinion that the Jebusites were identical to the Hittites, which continues to be the case, though less so.[13] However, an increasingly popular view, first put forward by Edward Lipinski, professor of Oriental and Slavonic studies at the Catholic University of Leuven, is that the Jebusites were most likely an Amorite tribe; Lipinski identified them with the group referred to as Yabusi'um in a cuneiform letter found in the archive of Mari, Syria.[14] As Lipinski noted, however, it is entirely possible that more than one clan or tribe bore similar names, and thus that the Jebusites and Yabusi'um may have been separate people altogether.[15]

    In the Amarna letters, mention is made that the contemporaneous king of Jerusalem was named Abdi-Heba, which is a theophoric name invoking a Hurrian mother goddess named Hebat. This implies that the Jebusites were Hurrians themselves, were heavily influenced by Hurrian culture, or were dominated by a Hurrian maryannu class (i.e., a Hurrian warrior-class elite).[16] Moreover, the last Jebusite king of Jerusalem, Araunah/Awarna/Arawna (or Ornan),[17] bore a name generally understood as based on the Hurrian honorific ewir.[18]

    Richard Hess[19] (1997:34–6) points to four Hurrian names in the Bible's Conquest narrative: Piram (king of Jarmuth) and Hoham (king of Hebron) (Jos 10:3), Sheshai and Talmai, sons of Anak (Jos 15:14) with Hurrian-based names.

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    Between this paper modelling Ashkenazi as ~45% Neolithic Central European and the one on Ancient Lombard DNA showing very EEF-like people in Iron Age Hungary I can't help but wonder if there were other remaining EEF-like peoples in Central Europe at the time who could have possibly contributed to the Ashkenazi ethnogenesis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Falco View Post
    Between this paper modelling Ashkenazi as ~45% Neolithic Central European and the one on Ancient Lombard DNA showing very EEF-like people in Iron Age Hungary I can't help but wonder if there were other remaining EEF-like peoples in Central Europe at the time who could have possibly contributed to the Ashkenazi ethnogenesis.
    It's strange, right? There's also an Iron Age Thracian who's very "Tuscan" like.

    The problem with the Ashkenazim is that their ethnogenesis is in the early centuries after 1000 AD, and so IBD analysis should work, and yet there's no significant IBD sharing showing up except a small percentage with Poles.



    If you're interested in that topic, you might want to read Xue et al:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5380316/

    I wish they publish both of those papers.

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    2 members found this post helpful.
    Here's a good book to get us jazzed up for the paper while we wait:

    Check out Chapter 1 in Nadav Na'aman's "Canaan in the 2nd Millenium BCE" (2005). It's all about the Hurrians in Canaan and touches on earlier Anatolian migrations like the Khirbet Kerak ware people. Plus it talks about Megiddo burials which will feature in the upcoming paper as well.

    And Ironside, it reaffirms the "northern" origin of the kings of Jerusalem that you wrote about.

    (I don't have enough posts here to post links yet, but if you google the book title, the whole thing is available on Google Books for free).

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    Quote Originally Posted by eblashko View Post
    Here's a good book to get us jazzed up for the paper while we wait:

    Check out Chapter 1 in Nadav Na'aman's "Canaan in the 2nd Millenium BCE" (2005). It's all about the Hurrians in Canaan and touches on earlier Anatolian migrations like the Khirbet Kerak ware people. Plus it talks about Megiddo burials which will feature in the upcoming paper as well.

    And Ironside, it reaffirms the "northern" origin of the kings of Jerusalem that you wrote about.

    (I don't have enough posts here to post links yet, but if you google the book title, the whole thing is available on Google Books for free).
    Thanks, welcome to Eupedia eblashko :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by IronSide View Post
    Thanks, welcome to Eupedia eblashko :)
    Thanks! Happy to have found such a cool place :)

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    I want to read it, is it out yet ?

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    It's interesting to consider that much of the European ancestry in Western Jews might be even older than the Romans. Especially when their obvious European ties have been used to delegitimatize them as connected to the Biblical Israelites.

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