Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Emotional bond between humans and dogs dates back 14,000 years

  1. #1
    Moderator Achievements:
    Three FriendsTagger First Class1 year registered50000 Experience Points
    Awards:
    Master Tagger
    Jovialis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-05-17
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,824
    Points
    90,576
    Level
    93
    Points: 90,576, Level: 93
    Level completed: 65%, Points required for next Level: 674
    Overall activity: 99.3%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1a1a2b1 (R-F1794)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H6a1b

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States



    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.

    Emotional bond between humans and dogs dates back 14,000 years



    Prehistoric people may well have had an emotional bond with domesticated dogs much earlier than we thought. Leiden Ph.D. candidate and vet Luc Janssens discovered that a dog found at the start of the last century in a grave dating back 14,000 years had been sick for a long time and had been cared for. Publication in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

    Humans and dogs in shared grave

    The grave itself, including the remains of a man, a woman and two dogs, was discovered by chance in 1914 by a group of workers not far from Bonn. Recent research shows that the remains date from the Paleolithic era, making them 14,000 years old. This is the oldest known grave where humans and dogs were buried together, and it is among the earliest evidence of the domestication of dogs. It now appears that not only were the dogs domesticated, they were probably also intensively cared for.

    The younger dog in the grave must have been 27 or 28 weeks old when it died. Vet and Leiden Ph.D. candidate Luc Janssens examined the remains of the animal's teeth. Based on his findings, he concluded that the dog was probably suffering from a serious infection of the morbilli virus (also known as canine distemper). It is not possible to make a definitive diagnosis because the genetic material of the virus has perished. The characteristic damage to the dog's teeth leads Janssens to believe that the animal contracted the illness as a puppy (at around 3 to 4 months). After this the dog may have had two or possibly even three periods of serious illness lasting 5 to 6 weeks.

    "Without adequate care, a dog with a serious case of distemper will die in less than three weeks," Janssens explains. This dog was clearly seriously ill but it survived a further eight weeks, which would only be possible if it had been well cared for. "That would mean keeping it warm and clean and giving it food and water, even though, while it was sick, the dog would not have been of any practical use as a working animal. This, together with the fact that the dogs were buried with people who we may assume were their owners, suggests that there was a unique relationship of care between humans and dogs as long as 14,000 years ago."


    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-02-emotio...dates.html#jCp
    Abstract


    The Bonn-Oberkassel dog remains (Upper Pleistocene and 14223 +- 58 years old) have been reported more than 100 years ago. Recent re-examination revealed the tooth of another older and smaller dog, making this domestic dog burial not only the oldest known, but also the only one with remains of two dogs. This observation brings the total known Magdalenian dogs to nine.

    Domestication of dogs during the final Palaeolithic has important implications for understanding pre-Holocene hunter-gatherers. Most proposed hunter-gatherer motivations for domesticating dogs have been utilitarian. However, remains of the Bonn-Oberkassel dogs may offer another view.

    The Bonn-Oberkassel dog was a late juvenile when it was buried at approximately age 27–28 weeks, with two adult humans and grave goods. Oral cavity lesions indicate a gravely ill dog that likely suffered a morbillivirus (canine distemper) infection. A dental line of suggestive enamel hypoplasia appears at the 19-week developmental stage. Two additional enamel hypoplasia lines, on the canine only, document further disease episodes at weeks 21 and 23. Pathological changes also include severe periodontal disease that may have been facilitated by immunodeficiency.

    Since canine distemper has a three-week disease course with very high mortality, the dog must have been perniciously ill during the three disease bouts and between ages 19 and 23 weeks. Survival without intensive human assistance would have been unlikely. Before and during this period, the dog cannot have held any utilitarian use to humans.

    We suggest that at least some Late Pleistocene humans regarded dogs not just materialistically, but may have developed emotional and caring bonds for their dogs, as reflected by the survival of this dog, quite possibly through human care.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...05440318300049

  2. #2
    Advisor Achievements:
    Three FriendsVeteranTagger First Class50000 Experience PointsRecommendation First Class
    Awards:
    Discussion Ender
    LeBrok's Avatar
    Join Date
    18-11-09
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    10,329
    Points
    113,888
    Level
    100
    Points: 113,888, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b Z2109
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H1c

    Ethnic group
    Citizen of the world
    Country: Canada-Alberta



    The bond is amazing and not seen in other animals. Dogs prefer to be around people more than other dogs. It has to be engraved in their DNA.
    Be wary of people who tend to glorify the past, underestimate the present, and demonize the future.

  3. #3
    Moderator Achievements:
    Three FriendsTagger First Class1 year registered50000 Experience Points
    Awards:
    Master Tagger
    Jovialis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-05-17
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,824
    Points
    90,576
    Level
    93
    Points: 90,576, Level: 93
    Level completed: 65%, Points required for next Level: 674
    Overall activity: 99.3%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1a1a2b1 (R-F1794)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H6a1b

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States



    Quote Originally Posted by LeBrok View Post
    The bond is amazing and not seen in other animals. Dogs prefer to be around people more than other dogs. It has to be engraved in their DNA.
    I agree, perhaps because they know they can rely on humans for optimal survival. Where with other dogs, they're in competition for sustenance.

  4. #4
    Regular Member Achievements:
    Three FriendsVeteran5000 Experience Points
    LABERIA's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-09-15
    Posts
    2,058
    Points
    5,204
    Level
    21
    Points: 5,204, Level: 21
    Level completed: 31%, Points required for next Level: 346
    Overall activity: 0%


    Ethnic group
    Albanian
    Country: Albania



    « Non esiste patto che non sia stato spezzato, non esiste fedeltà che non sia stata tradita, all'infuori di quella di un cane veramente fedele.[1] »

    «There is no pact that has not been broken, there is no loyalty that has not been betrayed, except that of a truly faithful dog.[1] »
    Konrad Lorenz

    17 Dec.
    Paget to the Council.
    Now the Council's letters seem to imply (words quoted) that the King will keep no strangers save the Albanoys.
    Cales, 17 Dec. 1545. Signed.
    O me zhabat në moçale, o me zhgabat lart në male!
    -Petro Nini Luarasi-

  5. #5
    Guest Achievements:
    Three FriendsVeteran5000 Experience Points
    ΠΑΝΑΞ's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-03-14
    Posts
    246
    Points
    5,122
    Level
    21
    Points: 5,122, Level: 21
    Level completed: 15%, Points required for next Level: 428
    Overall activity: 0%


    Country: Greece



    Quote Originally Posted by LABERIA View Post
    « Non esiste patto che non sia stato spezzato, non esiste fedeltà che non sia stata tradita, all'infuori di quella di un cane veramente fedele.[1] » «There is no pact that has not been broken, there is no loyalty that has not been betrayed, except that of a truly faithful dog.[1] » Konrad Lorenz
    That works the same with chicken. It was full of trust till the day became soup.Sorry Konrad.All the animals have feelings, I would not deploy it further. The unigue issue -as I consider- with the dogs is that they keep eye contact with the leader.Check it with your eye

  6. #6
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    15,357
    Points
    282,490
    Level
    100
    Points: 282,490, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Cats maintain eye contact too. In fact, one way that cat experts tell you a cat is signalling trust is if while staring at you it blinks. If there is danger it doesn't blink. If you blink back at the cat, it can go on for quite a while.

    It's not at all like with a dog, of course.

    Dogs do like to be with people all the time, unlike cats. Then, even within dogs, certain breeds and certain individual dogs get more attached. That's why if you don't want a needy animal you really shouldn't get a dog.

    This is at the front of my mind because we have a new puppy in the house. We got him when he was close to three months, and now he's close to four months old. He's a very loving dog, but perhaps because of that he wants to be with "his" people all the time, and I mean ALL the time. It's worse than having a baby or toddler.

    Even being away from us for a half hour is a trauma. He's such a beggar for food, that we put him in the basement family room when we're eating. Once he's a little older and trained, it shouldn't be necessary. The entire time he's shut away he whimpers. When he's let out he's like a madman with excitement, licking everyone he can reach. To be honest, he's exhausting.

    It's hard not to love him, though. :)

    [IMG][/IMG]



    [IMG][/IMG]


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  7. #7
    Regular Member Achievements:
    OverdriveVeteranThree Friends25000 Experience Points
    Yetos's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-10-11
    Location
    Makedonia
    Posts
    5,198
    Points
    39,935
    Level
    61
    Points: 39,935, Level: 61
    Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 415
    Overall activity: 0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    G2a3a
    MtDNA haplogroup
    X2b

    Ethnic group
    Makedonian original
    Country: Greece



    From Argos the dog of Odysseas



    To Alexandrou Peritas




    to modern day legend of Japanese Akita Inu
    Hachiko






    and lets not forget Laika


    the first life that travel in space,
    but never 'return' back

    how much trust had in humans
    ΟΘΕΝ ΑΙΔΩΣ OY EINAI
    ΑΤΗ ΛΑΜΒΑΝΕΙΝ ΑΥΤΟΙΣ
    ΥΒΡΙΣ ΓΕΝΝΑΤΑΙ
    ΝΕΜΕΣΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΙΣΗ ΑΚΟΛΟΥΘΟΥΣΙ ΔΕ

    When there is no shame
    Divine blindness conquers them
    Hybris (abuse, opprombium) is born
    Nemesis and punishment follows.

    Εχε υπομονη Ηρωα
    Η τιμωρια δεν αργει.

  8. #8
    Princess Achievements:
    Overdrive10000 Experience PointsVeteranThree Friends
    davef's Avatar
    Join Date
    19-06-16
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    2,219
    Points
    11,302
    Level
    32
    Points: 11,302, Level: 32
    Level completed: 8%, Points required for next Level: 648
    Overall activity: 18.0%


    Ethnic group
    Italian,Irish,Jewish
    Country: USA - New York



    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Cats maintain eye contact too. In fact, one way that cat experts tell you a cat is signalling trust is if while staring at you it blinks. If there is danger it doesn't blink. If you blink back at the cat, it can go on for quite a while.

    It's not at all like with a dog, of course.

    Dogs do like to be with people all the time, unlike cats. Then, even within dogs, certain breeds and certain individual dogs get more attached. That's why if you don't want a needy animal you really shouldn't get a dog.

    This is at the front of my mind because we have a new puppy in the house. We got him when he was close to three months, and now he's close to four months old. He's a very loving dog, but perhaps because of that he wants to be with "his" people all the time, and I mean ALL the time. It's worse than having a baby or toddler.

    Even being away from us for a half hour is a trauma. He's such a beggar for food, that we put him in the basement family room when we're eating. Once he's a little older and trained, it shouldn't be necessary. The entire time he's shut away he whimpers. When he's let out he's like a madman with excitement, licking everyone he can reach. To be honest, he's exhausting.

    It's hard not to love him, though. :)

    [IMG][/IMG]



    [IMG][/IMG]
    Wow 4 months old and he's already clawing through your sofa (2nd pic)
    mmmmmmmmm dooouuughhhnuuuutz

  9. #9
    Regular Member Achievements:
    Three FriendsVeteran5000 Experience Points
    LABERIA's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-09-15
    Posts
    2,058
    Points
    5,204
    Level
    21
    Points: 5,204, Level: 21
    Level completed: 31%, Points required for next Level: 346
    Overall activity: 0%


    Ethnic group
    Albanian
    Country: Albania



    Quote Originally Posted by ΠΑΝΑΞ View Post
    That works the same with chicken. It was full of trust till the day became soup.Sorry Konrad.All the animals have feelings, I would not deploy it further. The unigue issue -as I consider- with the dogs is that they keep eye contact with the leader.Check it with your eye
    I don`t know if work the same with chicken. I found this interesting article o Yahoo.it and i tried to translate with the help of Google:

    Captain, the dog that for ten years took care of the master's grave



    MTT
    Yahoo News 22 February 2018






    For eleven years, therefore, the life of Capitan is all there, between the four walls of the cemetery of Villa Carlos Paz. He never leaves Miguel's grave. (Credits - Youtube)

    A love story that lasted over a decade and that not even death has stopped. It is the love story between Capitan and Miguel Guzman . Miguel is a man, Captain a dog. A crossbreed of German Shepherd. A love story that was born in 2005, when Miguel decided to give this dog a bit 'special, but docile, to the teenage son . In reality, however, in the house Capitan binds only with the man, with the unconvincing wife and the son who yes, is fond of Captain, but at 13 he has other interests in mind. In 2006 Miguel Guzman died and was buried in the Argentine cemetery at Villa Carlos Paz , in the province of Còrdoba. Captain disappears, he never shows up at home and after a while his wife and son think he has found a new family. So it is not. Going to the cemetery to find Miguel, in fact, the woman and the boy see Captain there, on Miguel's grave . They call him to go home, but he does not want to, he wants to stay there, with his friend. How Captain found the cemetery, miles away from home, is a mystery.
    So it turns out that Capitan is from January 2007 attending the cemetery . "He was limping because he had a fractured paw. I called a veterinarian who injected him with anti-inflammatories while my sons fenced his paw. His presence has always been very discreet. He immediately made himself known. The boys feed him. I tried several times to take him home but he never strays from his owner's grave. The affection he continues to have for him is touching, " says the flower shop in the cemetery .
    For eleven years, therefore, the life of Capitan is all there, between the four walls of the cemetery of Villa Carlos Paz. He never leaves Miguel's grave . Those who know him bring him food, allows him to stay warm in the cold months, but nobody can convince him to leave his friend . Until a few days ago, when even Captain dies. And now there are those who hope that the German Shepherd may be buried near his master.



    https://it.notizie.yahoo.com/capitan...101157066.html

  10. #10
    Regular Member Achievements:
    100 Experience Points7 days registered
    /Serg/'s Avatar
    Join Date
    08-03-18
    Location
    Moscow Area
    Posts
    26
    Points
    227
    Level
    2
    Points: 227, Level: 2
    Level completed: 77%, Points required for next Level: 23
    Overall activity: 0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1a
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H1c

    Ethnic group
    My ancestors were farmers near the Black Sea.
    Country: Russian Federation



    Prehistoric people may well have had an emotional bond with domesticated dogs much earlier than we thought.
    Ethology states that they were not Homo Sapiens at all.
    Dogs were domesticated somewhere in Africa some millions years аgо.

    As Victor Dolnik said in his book, "dogs were every time and everywhere - hunting dogs, herding dogs, training dogs... somebody to care about or something without any goal, just a dog... an emotional relationship between two species has an instinctively basis".

  11. #11
    Regular Member Achievements:
    Veteran10000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    25-02-10
    Posts
    144
    Points
    10,711
    Level
    31
    Points: 10,711, Level: 31
    Level completed: 23%, Points required for next Level: 539
    Overall activity: 10.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1b2a1a
    MtDNA haplogroup
    J1c1

    Ethnic group
    Appalachian American
    Country: USA - West Virginia



    Quote Originally Posted by /Serg/ View Post
    Ethology states that they were not Homo Sapiens at all.
    Dogs were domesticated somewhere in Africa some millions years аgо.
    By whom, aferensis or habilis? I don't buy it, but it reminds me of this story.

  12. #12
    Regular Member Achievements:
    100 Experience Points7 days registered
    /Serg/'s Avatar
    Join Date
    08-03-18
    Location
    Moscow Area
    Posts
    26
    Points
    227
    Level
    2
    Points: 227, Level: 2
    Level completed: 77%, Points required for next Level: 23
    Overall activity: 0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1a
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H1c

    Ethnic group
    My ancestors were farmers near the Black Sea.
    Country: Russian Federation



    Quote Originally Posted by elghund View Post
    By whom, aferensis or habilis?
    As far as I know, both Afarensis and Habilis had no fire. No right handed attributes were found between them, so they probably had very few language skills (this is related to speech and communicative abilities, and and was found in dolfins and birds - from a parrot to a canary). Homo Erectus knew fire and most of them were right handed, so I think it was Homo Erectus or someone before him.

    All of them were gatherers who often tended to eat animal corpses. In African savannah, when a big animal falls to the ground, a whole zoo park sats down around it in a half of hour, so fighting for the beef were by no means a stupid affair!

    First who notes a big animal today are birds, vultures. But they cannot start to eat the animal, so they tends to wait. Hyena dogs watches birds (as gambler watches the Dow Jones charts) and rush to the same place. Human predecessors also watched those big black birds in the sky and often took away their dinner. I think some of the dogs were so clever so they made a deal with ancient people.

    Then a fire was discovered. There are only two species who likes to sit down and look into a fire. Dogs were second.
    Last edited by /Serg/; 10-03-18 at 22:17.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •