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Thread: The Mysterious Picts (Pictish) - an extinct Celtic tribe that once lived in Scotland

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    Regular Member Redmayne's Avatar
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    The Mysterious Picts (Pictish) - an extinct Celtic tribe that once lived in Scotland

    What and how much do we know about the Pictish people of the Northern British Isles.? (Scotland et. al.)

    They were a Celtic tribe that settled there. But, were later taken over by a neighboring clan or tribe of Goidelic Insular Celts that evolved on their own in isolated.

    Many people believe that they (Picts) were just a large tribal confederation descended from Brythonic (Brittonic) Celts. While others argue/believe that they were an entirely separate Celtic tribe; differentiated by dialect and facial features and mutually distinguishable from the Goidelic (Gaelic) and Brittonics. (that would make 3 tribes of Insular Celts)

    What was the fate of these people? (Pictish) Were they mostly killed? Or were they eventually forced to have a friendly assimilation by their invading Goidelic neighbors?

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    The Mysterious Picts (Pictish) - an extinct Celtic tribe that once lived in Scotland

    Quote Originally Posted by Redmayne View Post
    What and how much do we know about the Pictish people of the Northern British Isles.? (Scotland et. al.)

    They were a Celtic tribe that settled there. But, were later taken over by a neighboring clan or tribe of Goidelic Insular Celts that evolved on their own in isolated.

    Many people believe that they (Picts) were just a large tribal confederation descended from Brythonic (Brittonic) Celts. While others argue/believe that they were an entirely separate Celtic tribe; differentiated by dialect and facial features and mutually distinguishable from the Goidelic (Gaelic) and Brittonics. (that would make 3 tribes of Insular Celts)

    What was the fate of these people? (Pictish) Were they mostly killed? Or were they eventually forced to have a friendly assimilation by their invading Goidelic neighbors?
    Some LivingDNA info about the Picts, and Northwest Scotland:
    “This area has been changed throughout the years by migrations and kingdoms, and has a reputation for its independent, warlike tribes - the ‘Picts’. To the Romans, these tribal people were called ‘painted ones’. Unlike the overly literal portrayal from the film ‘Braveheart’, they were probably not covered in blue paint, but were actually heavily tattooed across the face and body. It is thought that the genetic signature today is influenced by the Kingdom of the Picts - the original tattoo artists of Scotland.
    The signature is influenced by Irish migrations, and has Irish roots to this day. In 550 AD, the Kingdom of the Dalriada spread from Northern Ireland across into North West Scotland. It was thought to be more of a cohesive introduction than a full blown, violent invasion. Remarkably, the genetic signature for North West Scotland closely matches the boundaries of this kingdom, showing the extent of an Irish genetic legacy. The Romans called these people ‘Scotti’ which ultimately led to the creation of Scotland's name. The Irish legacy has therefore created the name of Scotland, as well as influencing the Gaelic language and genetic heritage.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    Some LivingDNA info about the Picts, and Northwest Scotland:
    “This area has been changed throughout the years by migrations and kingdoms, and has a reputation for its independent, warlike tribes - the ‘Picts’. To the Romans, these tribal people were called ‘painted ones’. Unlike the overly literal portrayal from the film ‘Braveheart’, they were probably not covered in blue paint, but were actually heavily tattooed across the face and body. It is thought that the genetic signature today is influenced by the Kingdom of the Picts - the original tattoo artists of Scotland.
    The signature is influenced by Irish migrations, and has Irish roots to this day. In 550 AD, the Kingdom of the Dalriada spread from Northern Ireland across into North West Scotland. It was thought to be more of a cohesive introduction than a full blown, violent invasion. Remarkably, the genetic signature for North West Scotland closely matches the boundaries of this kingdom, showing the extent of an Irish genetic legacy. The Romans called these people ‘Scotti’ which ultimately led to the creation of Scotland's name. The Irish legacy has therefore created the name of Scotland, as well as influencing the Gaelic language and genetic heritage.”
    R1b L1335 L1065+ is posited to be a major Pictish Haplo, but it seems logical that Picts in a broader sense would have been an amalgam of tribes with similar aims and interests. Current theory holds that Picts spoke a Brythonic tongue. A major 1065+ clan today are the Campbells of Argyll, and they are said to have been an original Strathclyde/Brythonic tribe who migrated into the Highlands in early CE.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    here under a copy and paste of a post of mine in linguistics
    Alan RAUDE (a Breton) thinks the term Brittia applied to Northern Britain (Procopus de Cesarea (565 AD) discribed Britain as compound of two islands, Britannia, in front of Spain, and Brittia, in front of the Rhine mouth ; in his mind, Brittia was peopled by Angilot, Frissones and Britones (Angles, Frisians and Brittons); RAUDE cites some namings evolution by time, according to ancient historians : Britanni was the name of Britain inhabitants for Caesar and Tacitus, and Gildas, but already some legions contained the term Brittones (Flavia Brittonum, Aurelia Brittonum, Brittones Caledonense…) side by side with Britanni (Cohors III Britannorum, (Ala I Britannica) … Gildas wrote an name Brittana around 545 AD, and it seems a « crossing » between Britannia and Brittonia. Since the end of the 4th century, everytime that Brittones are localized, it’s in Northern Britain.
    It seems Britannia could already be a latin « mix » of Pretania (see the Cruithni in Northern Ireland) ; Brittia could be a latinization of a name containing a root *brikt cognate with *brîkt, both meaning « speckled », « motted », which gave Breton brizh and Welsh brith/braith with the same meaning plus « multi-coloured » ; the /britt-/ could be the reflex of Brittonic */brijt/*/briçt/ which became /briθ/ ; do notice the words : Breton brezhell « mackerel », Welsh brithyll « perch », speckled fishes, and Breton brech, Welsh brech, both « irruption », « nettle rash » and other dseases affecting skin ; and do notice that ancient *-tt , *-kt and *-pt all of them gave -(i)th and -(i)zh in Welsh and Breton -
    so the Northern Pretani would have had a specific name formed on britt- (brikt-) with this meaning of « speckled », « motted » which could express the fact they were tattoed ; it could very well be convenient for the « oldest » or most traditional tribes of North Britain which became the basis of the future Picts who were tattoed.
    & : Brittany is Breizh in Breton, on the same root (with short /i/) and it is of some worth to know that the most of the nobility who made the bulk of these migrants would have beenCornishmen of those times, it’s to say the Northern ones, and also people from Stratclud in South Central Scotland ; (in fact Cornovi were found in more than a place, among them North-East to Wales - Cheshire/ Lancahire - and even Caithness in farthest Northern Scotland ; this group of tribes was allied to Rome and furnished troops to the Empire, if what I red is true).

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