Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: (NEW) GenePlaza K15 UPDATED Ancient Cultures Calculator

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    17-06-17
    Posts
    127


    Country: United States



    2 members found this post helpful.

    (NEW) GenePlaza K15 UPDATED Ancient Cultures Calculator

    Hello,

    Kurd has been discussing that he will release a new calculator. It's released, and I just received my results. It costs 5 bucks.



    Reference Map:



    About Calculator:

    The motivation behind this calculator was the recent publication of dozens of higher quality ancient genomes in Mathieson et al., 2018; The Genomic History Of Southeastern Europe and in Olalde et al., 2017 The Beaker Phenomenon And The Genomic Transformation Of Northwest Europe, and in Narasimhan et al., 2018,The Genomic Formation of South and Central Asia. These genomes greatly added to our understanding of the population demography of Europe, Western, Central, and South Asia, and this calculator is the 1st public ADMIXTURE based calculator to parse your genome and compare it to very recently sequenced ancient cultures from Central and South Asia. To increase accuracy of the results, and SNP overlaps between the customer and the calculator population references, only genomes with the highest average read depth coverage were carefully chosen to source the component allele frequencies. The calculator algorithm used is detailed at the calculator creator’s website; Eurasian DNA. Thus we believe that this is the most accurate ADMIXTURE based calculator to date which is based on ancient populations. This calculator uses higher coverage ancient genomes from the aforementioned as well as previous studies to represent the various Neolithic, Chalcolithic, and Bronze Age cultures, stretching from western Europe all the way to central Asia and Siberia, and which contributed to the genetic makeup of the various modern populations currently residing across Eurasia. Beaker people are known for their distinctive bell beaker style pottery. The culture spread across Europe likely from the Iberian peninsula all the way to Poland around 4700 years ago and lasted till around 3800 years ago. They appear to have displaced the Corded Ware culture which had thrived earlier in eastern Europe. Prior to the spread of the Beaker culture, Britain was occupied by British Neolithic farmers who were genetically very similar to Iberian Neolithic farmers, suggesting a movement to Britain from W Europe rather from Germany. The German and SE European Neolithic farmers are likely ancestral to the Iberian and British Neolithic farmers, the latter being distinguished by an additional layer of Western-European Hunter Gatherers (WHG) admixture. WHG were the long-time occupants of Europe prior to the arrival of the Neolithic farmers from the Near-East around 8000 years ago. WHG who had occupied Europe for many millennia since the Upper Paleolithic appear to have survived in almost un-admixed form until as recently as 7800 years ago in Serbia and Romania (Iron Gates HG). The were subsequently absorbed into the Neolithic farmer societies which had spread from Anatolia into Europe around 8000 years ago. The 2nd major population movement into Europe came from the Eurasian steppes (Russia) to the east around the Bronze age. These Eurasian steppe folks were derived from cultures such as the Yamna, Srubna, and Andronovo and it is very likely that is how Indo-European languages were introduced into Europe. Todays Europeans are substantially a tri-fold mixture of WHG, Neolithic farmers originating from the Near-East, and Eurasian steppe pastoralists, in varying proportions. Eurasian steppe pastoralists genetic sub-structure includes Eastern European Hunter Gatherers (EHG) ancestry as well as Caucasus Hunter Gatherers (CHG) and Iranian Neolithic farmer ancestry. There are also additional other minor contributions to Europe’s genetic landscape, including minor African/SW Asian admixture especially in southern Europe, and E Asian / Siberian admixture, which was likely contributed by populations related to the Bronze age Karasuk culture via Uralic proxies, Scythians, and various Turkic groups. Here we also utilize for the first time ancient genomes from Turan (present day Iran, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan), the Indus Valley ( present day Pakistan), and from various cultures in Kazakhstan and surrounds, which are believed to have introduced Indo-European languages into the region. Ancestry from the Eurasian Steppe genetically linked Europe and South Asia in the Bronze Age. Present day South and West Asians owe their existence to these ancient populations. From the Narasimhan et al. 2018 pre-print: Our data reveal a complex set of genetic sources that ultimately combined to form the ancestry of South Asians today. We document a southward spread of genetic ancestry from the Eurasian Steppe, correlating with the archaeologically known expansion of pastoralist sites from the Steppe to Turan in the Middle Bronze Age (2300-1500 BCE). These Steppe communities mixed genetically with peoples of the Bactria Margiana Archaeological Complex (BMAC) whom they encountered in Turan (primarily descendants of earlier agriculturalists of Iran). Steppe communities integrated farther south throughout the 2nd millennium BCE, and we show that they mixed with a more southern population that we document at multiple sites as outlier individuals exhibiting a distinctive mixture of ancestry related to Iranian agriculturalists and South Asian hunter-gathers. We call this group Indus Periphery because they were found at sites in cultural contact with the Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) and along its northern fringe, and also because they were genetically similar to post-IVC groups in the Swat Valley of Pakistan. By co-analyzing ancient DNA and genomic data from diverse present-day South Asians, we show that Indus Periphery-related people are the single most important source of ancestry in South Asia—consistent with the idea that the Indus Periphery individuals are providing us with the first direct look at the ancestry of peoples of the IVC—and we develop a model for the formation of present-day South Asians in terms of the temporally and geographically proximate sources of Indus Periphery-Our results show how ancestry from the Steppe genetically linked Europe and South Asia in the Bronze Age, and identifies the populations that almost certainly were responsible for spreading Indo-European languages across much of Eurasia."
    References:
    1. The Genomic History Of Southeastern Europe, Iain Mathieson et al., 2018.
    2. The Beaker Phenomenon And The Genomic Transformation Of Northwest Europe, Iñigo Olalde et al., 2017.
    3. The Genomic Formation of South and Central Asia, Narasimhan et al., 2018.
    Last edited by noman; 01-05-18 at 08:06.

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    25-02-10
    Posts
    165

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1b2a1a
    MtDNA haplogroup
    J1c1

    Ethnic group
    Appalachian American
    Country: USA - West Virginia



    It gave me almost two percent modern Chinese. I've tested at 23andMe, LivingDNA, 23andMe, and FTDNA. None of them have given me a trace of Chinese or East Asian. Plus, the calculator says K14 instead of K15 now.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    17-06-17
    Posts
    127


    Country: United States



    Quote Originally Posted by elghund View Post
    It gave me almost two percent modern Chinese. I've tested at 23andMe, LivingDNA, 23andMe, and FTDNA. None of them have given me a trace of Chinese or East Asian. Plus, the calculator says K14 instead of K15 now.
    Maybe, it says "Ancient" that's why you got some Chinese percentage too.

  4. #4
    Regular Member Stuvanè's Avatar
    Join Date
    25-09-16
    Location
    Milan
    Posts
    471

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    J2
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H1e

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: Italy



    Indeed, the use of modern Chinese and African DNA is not entirely clear to me when all the remaining samples should be ancient. In any case this is minePSX_20180501_123142.jpg

    Inviato dal mio SM-J730F utilizzando Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Advisor Jovialis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-05-17
    Posts
    5,267

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1a1a2b1 (R-F1794)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H6a1b

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States



    1 members found this post helpful.
    The Bell Beaker population in Iberia was genetically distinct from the ones found in other parts of Europe. So wouldn't that throw off the grouping of that population?

    We found that the Beaker population in Iberia was genetically very different from the Beaker populations in central Europe. A very similar culture was shared by two biologically distinct groups. And the Iberian Beaker samples were genetically indistinguishable from the non-Beaker Iberians they lived among. One possible explanation is that a subgroup of people in Iberia developed a belief system that was different from that of their neighbors.


    https://hms.harvard.edu/news/coming-focus

    https://www.nature.com/articles/natu...M0GfBq0hmKQSEw

    Discussion on the paper here:
    https://www.eupedia.com/forum/thread...rthwest-Europe
    Last edited by Jovialis; 01-05-18 at 14:38.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    24-02-15
    Posts
    243


    Country: United States



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post
    The Bell Beaker population in Iberia was genetically distinct from the ones found in other parts of Europe. So wouldn't that throw off the grouping of that population?

    https://www.nature.com/articles/natu...M0GfBq0hmKQSEw

    Discussion on the paper here:
    https://www.eupedia.com/forum/thread...rthwest-Europe
    That study is inconclusive because there aren't enough Iberian samples. It looks like they tested Early Farmers that dated to before the arrival of the Beakers.

  7. #7
    Regular Member Dibran's Avatar
    Join Date
    25-09-16
    Posts
    932

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R-L1029>Y133361
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H11a2b*

    Ethnic group
    Albanian/Gheg/Dibran/Okshtun
    Country: United States



    Geneplaza K14 Ancient Admixture Results

    New calculator from Kurd up on Geneplaza. The following are mine/my fathers/my mothers results.

    Me:





    My Mother:





    My Father:



  8. #8
    Advisor Jovialis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-05-17
    Posts
    5,267

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1a1a2b1 (R-F1794)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H6a1b

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States



    I'm going to merge this into the other thread based on this topic.

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    17-06-17
    Posts
    127


    Country: United States



    I guess Kurd made some recent changes in the calculator. My results got updated! European reduced by 2.6%


  10. #10
    Advisor Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    19,182


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Just did it. Stuvane, if you see this, could you repost your results? I can't see them.

    Can't see mine either. Having trouble posting it. Hold on.

    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]

    I don't understand the Central and South Asia number.







    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  11. #11
    Regular Member Stuvanè's Avatar
    Join Date
    25-09-16
    Location
    Milan
    Posts
    471

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    J2
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H1e

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: Italy



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Just did it. Stuvane, if you see this, could you repost your results? I can't see them.

    Can't see mine either. Having trouble posting it. Hold on.

    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]

    I don't understand the Central and South Asia number.





    Hi Angela. Here are my new results PSX_20180521_230003.jpg

    Inviato dal mio SM-J730F utilizzando Tapatalk

  12. #12
    Elite member IronSide's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-10-16
    Age
    26
    Posts
    883

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    I2c2
    MtDNA haplogroup
    T2e1

    Country: United Arab Emirates



    There are no Levantine references ? Not going to be useful for middle easterners or north africans.

    Natufians or Ain Ghazal would have sufficed. I see no reason why he didn't add them.

  13. #13
    Princess davef's Avatar
    Join Date
    19-06-16
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    2,204


    Ethnic group
    Italian,Irish,Jewish
    Country: USA - New York



    Quote Originally Posted by IronSide View Post
    There are no Levantine references ? Not going to be useful for middle easterners or north africans.

    Natufians or Ain Ghazal would have sufficed. I see no reason why he didn't add them.
    Yeah, it totally ignores the Middle East and North Africa. I think Central and South Asians would do best with this.
    mmmmmmmmm dooouuughhhnuuuutz

  14. #14
    Advisor Jovialis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-05-17
    Posts
    5,267

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1a1a2b1 (R-F1794)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H6a1b

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States





    I just saw this notice on the app page, which should give some context to the results.

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    08-04-18
    Posts
    8


    Country: United States



    Here's mine:

    EUROPEAN 58.5%
    Bell Beaker 22.8%
    Western HG 5.7%
    European NF 29.1%
    Latvian HG 1%

    EURASIAN STEPPE 27%
    MLBA Western 17%
    Siberian HG 1.1%
    MLBA Eastern 8.8%

    CENTRAL & SOUTH ASIAN 8.8%
    Turan Central 3.5%
    Indus Valley 4.2%
    South Asian 1.1%

    WESTERN EURASIAN STEPPE 5.4%
    Kura Araxes 5.4%

    SUB SAHARAN AFRICAN .4%

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •