Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Extra History Videos

  1. #1
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
    Join Date
    17-07-02
    Location
    Lothier
    Posts
    9,553


    Ethnic group
    Italo-celto-germanic
    Country: Belgium - Brussels



    2 members found this post helpful.

    Thumbs up Extra History Videos

    I have found an entertaining series of animated videos about various historical periods. They do a fairly good job at introducing or summarising the topics they cover. Everything is well researched. They spend 2 weeks to make a 10 minute episode and many topic run for 5 or 6 episodes (12 for Justinian and Theodora). As the videos are fast-paced, condensed and straight to the point a one-hour series on a topic includes as much information as a 2 or 3 hour documentary from the BBC or the History Channel. It's very time efficient, although the fast pace sometimes made me pause for a minute to let my brain time to absorb everything that was said. I also like to pause to check the Wikipedia page to get more details about a person or event mentioned.

    Here are a few examples.











    There are occasionally a few mistakes but these are typically corrected in an extra episode at the end called 'Lies'.
    Last edited by Maciamo; 28-06-18 at 21:53.
    My book selection---Follow me on Facebook and Twitter --- My profile on Academia.edu and on ResearchGate ----Check Wa-pedia's Japan Guide
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "What is the use of living, if it be not to strive for noble causes and to make this muddled world a better place for those who will live in it after we are gone?", Winston Churchill.

  2. #2
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
    Join Date
    17-07-02
    Location
    Lothier
    Posts
    9,553


    Ethnic group
    Italo-celto-germanic
    Country: Belgium - Brussels



    Not many people have heard of Odenathus, the ruler of Palmyra who saved the Eastern Roman Empire from being annexed by the Sasanian Empire in 260 CE. Without him, there would have been no Byzantine Empire and world history would have unfolded quite differently.


  3. #3
    Advisor bicicleur's Avatar
    Join Date
    27-01-13
    Location
    Zwevegem, Belgium
    Posts
    5,730


    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Not many people have heard of Odenathus, the ruler of Palmyra who saved the Eastern Roman Empire from being annexed by the Sasanian Empire in 260 CE. Without him, there would have been no Byzantine Empire and world history would have unfolded quite differently.

    Palmyra was considered to be the western end of the Silk road.
    And before Islam, the Arab tirbes were mercenairies, sometimes for the Roman Empire, sometimes for the Sassinides.
    Things changed when Islam united the Arabs for a single common cause.

  4. #4
    Regular Member Wheal's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-09-17
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    367

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    Pat-U106-H11a10
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H5a1b

    Ethnic group
    a true mutt
    Country: USA - Illinois



    very cute series! These would be great to show to students in grade schools for a touch of various cultures.

  5. #5
    Elite member IronSide's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-10-16
    Age
    26
    Posts
    883

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    I2c2
    MtDNA haplogroup
    T2e1

    Country: United Arab Emirates



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Odaenathus bust



    His wife Zenobia is the stuff of legend

    Septimia Zenobia (Palmyrene: (Btzby), pronounced Bat-Zabbai; c. 240 – c. 274 AD) was a third-century queen of the Syria-based Palmyrene Empire. Many legends surround her ancestry; she was born to a noble Palmyrene family and married the ruler of the city, Odaenathus. Her husband became king in 260, elevating Palmyra to supreme power in the Near East by defeating the Sassaniansand stabilizing the Roman East. After Odaenathus' assassination, Zenobia became the regent of her son Vaballathus and held de factopower throughout his reign.In 270, Zenobia launched an invasion which brought most of the Roman East under her sway and culminated with the annexation of Egypt. By mid-271 her realm extended from Ancyra, central Anatolia, to southern Egypt, although she remained nominally subordinate to Rome. However, in reaction to Roman emperor Aurelian's campaign in 272, Zenobia declared her son emperor and assumed the title of empress (declaring Palmyra's secession from Rome). The Romans were victorious after heavy fighting; the queen was besieged in her capital and captured by Aurelian, who exiled her to Rome where she spent the remainder of her life.
    Zenobia was a cultured monarch and fostered an intellectual environment in her court, which was open to scholars and philosophers. She was tolerant toward her subjects, and protected religious minorities. The queen maintained a stable administration which governed a multicultural multiethnic empire. Zenobia died after 274, and many tales have been recorded about her fate. Her rise and fall have inspired historians, artists and novelists, and she is a national hero in Syria.

  6. #6
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
    Join Date
    17-07-02
    Location
    Lothier
    Posts
    9,553


    Ethnic group
    Italo-celto-germanic
    Country: Belgium - Brussels



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Extra History did a pretty good job with two of the greatest emperors of the 6th century: Justinian of the Byzantine Empire and Khosrau of the Persian Empire.

    The series on Justinian runs for 12 episodes, the longest of any topic so far.



    I learned a lot in the series about Khosrau Anushirawan, a monarch that I hadn't studied yet. He was the contemporary of Justinian and the two went to war with one another, so it's seems befitting to post both videos together.


  7. #7
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
    Join Date
    17-07-02
    Location
    Lothier
    Posts
    9,553


    Ethnic group
    Italo-celto-germanic
    Country: Belgium - Brussels



    I like the fact that they cover events or historical characters less well known of the general public.

    Mary Seacole was a half-Jamaican half-Scottish business woman and nurse who set up the "British Hotel" behind the lines during the Crimean War. Most people know Florence Nightingale, the upper-class English woman who pioneered nursing during that same Crimean War. But Mary Seacole was just as famous among British soldiers at the time and both were celebrated on their return to London after the war. History forgot about Mary Seacole for the next 100 years, but her memory is being revived and she was voted the greatest black Briton in 2004.



    Mary Anning was an early 19th-century English fossil collector who pioneered the field of palaeontology.



    The 2007-2008 financial crisis affected the lives of most people in developed countries over the last decade. People drew comparisons with the Great Depression of 1929, but one of the worst ever stock bubble burst was actually the South Sea Bubble in early 18th century England, and it was created by the government itself and ended up wiping out the savings of a big part of the population, including the king himself!


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •