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Thread: European fertility rates.

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.

    European fertility rates.



    I think we can see the impact of economic concerns here (Italy, Spain, Greece), but also, I think, religion, i.e. Islam, is a factor. Poland's stats are interesting as well.

    See:
    http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statist...2M05&lf=VALUE&


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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I think we can see the impact of economic concerns here (Italy, Spain, Greece), but also, I think, religion, i.e. Islam, is a factor. Poland's stats are interesting as well.

    See:
    http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statist...2M05&lf=VALUE&
    I like this thread. But I have few questions!
    France shows decent growth in certain areas! I wonder who is growing, ethnic French or minorities? France has a population of 67.2 million people. Out of them 51 million are French. The rest are North Africans, Sub Saharans, Asians etc. If the areas of growth are not real French for me that is a case of concern!
    I see the areas of Turkey where Kurds live there is 4% growth. If that statistic is true, Kurds need not to fight. In 50 years they will outnumber Turks. All they need to do is vote.
    Congratulations to Irish.! The only hot spot where is a future!
    Please comment on topic! Its interesting!

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I think we can see the impact of economic concerns here (Italy, Spain, Greece), but also, I think, religion, i.e. Islam, is a factor. Poland's stats are interesting as well.

    See:
    http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statist...2M05&lf=VALUE&
    economic concerns affect the birth rate in 2 ways. those who stay have less children because they don't have enough money for more. and those who leave, usually the younger generations will have no children in their country of origin. the latter is pr8bably the main reason for the low birth rate on the potuguese islands. the younger generation there is simply leaving.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tutkun Arnaut View Post
    I like this thread. But I have few questions!
    France shows decent growth in certain areas! I wonder who is growing, ethnic French or minorities? France has a population of 67.2 million people. Out of them 51 million are French. The rest are North Africans, Sub Saharans, Asians etc. If the areas of growth are not real French for me that is a case of concern!
    I see the areas of Turkey where Kurds live there is 4% growth. If that statistic is true, Kurds need not to fight. In 50 years they will outnumber Turks. All they need to do is vote.
    Congratulations to Irish.! The only hot spot where is a future!
    Please comment on topic! Its interesting!
    I have no doubt fertility among allochtones is higher in Europe, and in some major cities they'll be the majority soon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I think we can see the impact of economic concerns here (Italy, Spain, Greece), but also, I think, religion, i.e. Islam, is a factor. Poland's stats are interesting as well.

    See:
    http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statist...2M05&lf=VALUE&
    we had higher birth rates 3-4 generations ago, when population was much poorer than today
    IMO lower birthrates reflect a different way of life today

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I think we can see the impact of economic concerns here (Italy, Spain, Greece), but also, I think, religion, i.e. Islam, is a factor. Poland's stats are interesting as well.

    See:
    http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statist...2M05&lf=VALUE&
    Interesting map, looks like many people are waiting till their 30s to have children as well. Which is most likely attributed to economic concerns, and pursuit of careers.

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    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
    It's a question of expectations indeed. People want all the accoutrements of a modern, middle class lifestyle. If having children, or more than one or two children interferes with that, then they won't have more children. It's also a question of expectations in terms of what they want to give to their children.

    Birth control methods mean they have a choice.

    Religion and/or different cultural attitudes is a confounding factor in the case of immigrants from third world countries, for example.

    In the U.S. minority men (African-Americans and Hispanics), for example, are, according to the statistics, much less likely to be willing to use condoms. Young women are also more likely to get pregnant outside of wedlock or a stable partnership and support their children through public assistance.

    The more educated the women, the more likely also that she'll put off child bearing, meaning there will be fewer children, as the biological clock does tick on.

    Ireland has traditionally been an extremely observant Roman Catholic country for all of its history up to very recent times. I think one reason was that religion was tied to national feeling and identity in contrast to the Protestantism of the controlling English and Scots. The result is that church laws were much more strictly followed than in other Roman Catholic countries.

    When we arrived in the U.S., my parents were shocked at the size of Irish families. It wasn't unusual for them to have six, seven, eight children. It was said it was because they wouldn't use the "artificial" methods of birth control, proscribed by the Church. I'm a little skeptical. "Natural" methods might not work perfectly, but if you were practising them, how could you wind up with eleven or twelve children? Even today, while families of that size are uncommon, it's my impression that couples where at least one spouse is Irish tend to have at least three or four or even five children.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    It's a question of expectations indeed. People want all the accoutrements of a modern, middle class lifestyle. If having children, or more than one or two children interferes with that, then they won't have more children. It's also a question of expectations in terms of what they want to give to their children.

    Birth control methods mean they have a choice.

    Religion and/or different cultural attitudes is a confounding factor in the case of immigrants from third world countries, for example.

    In the U.S. minority men (African-Americans and Hispanics), for example, are, according to the statistics, much less likely to be willing to use condoms. Young women are also more likely to get pregnant outside of wedlock or a stable partnership and support their children through public assistance.

    The more educated the women, the more likely also that she'll put off child bearing, meaning there will be fewer children, as the biological clock does tick on.

    Ireland has traditionally been an extremely observant Roman Catholic country for all of its history up to very recent times. I think one reason was that religion was tied to national feeling and identity in contrast to the Protestantism of the controlling English and Scots. The result is that church laws were much more strictly followed than in other Roman Catholic countries.

    When we arrived in the U.S., my parents were shocked at the size of Irish families. It wasn't unusual for them to have six, seven, eight children. It was said it was because they wouldn't use the "artificial" methods of birth control, proscribed by the Church. I'm a little skeptical. "Natural" methods might not work perfectly, but if you were practising them, how could you wind up with eleven or twelve children? Even today, while families of that size are uncommon, it's my impression that couples where at least one spouse is Irish tend to have at least three or four or even five children.

    O mamma mia ..... Really !? I thought that huge irish families were common only in the past .... Wow ... I add that one generation ago in Albania having huge families as Irish have was very usual and common ... For example my maternal grandma has FOUR sons and FIVE daughters .... and my paternal grandma has FIVE daughters and ‘only’ TWO sons ...da una parte invidiabile ma .....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriele Pashaj View Post
    O mamma mia ..... Really !? I thought that huge irish families were common only in the past .... Wow ... I add that one generation ago in Albania having huge families as Irish have was very usual and common ... For example my maternal grandma has FOUR sons and FIVE daughters .... and my paternal grandma has FIVE daughters and ‘only’ TWO sons ...da una parte invidiabile ma .....
    Perhaps you misunderstood. Families of six, seven and on are highly unusual today for any group. However, as I said, it's my impression that Irish Americans still tend to have more than two. Families of three and four are quite common in my community. That seems to be the case in Ireland as well. (However, I know lots and lots of people of Irish descent born in the fifties, sixties, seventies and even eighties who come from families of eight, nine, ten, eleven. Stephen Colbert is one of 11, Amy Adams one of seven etc. )

    It's decidedly not the case in Italy. In northern and central Italy the birth rate started to plummet from the beginning of the twentieth century, and by the post second world war period, the one child family was extremely commonplace. To have three children was and is practically unheard of. The south eventually caught up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriele Pashaj View Post
    O mamma mia ..... Really !? I thought that huge irish families were common only in the past .... Wow ... I add that one generation ago in Albania having huge families as Irish have was very usual and common ... For example my maternal grandma has FOUR sons and FIVE daughters .... and my paternal grandma has FIVE daughters and ‘only’ TWO sons ...da una parte invidiabile ma .....
    I think till WW II, 7-8 children was quite common all over Europe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur View Post
    I think till WW II, 7-8 children was quite common all over Europe.
    I agree


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