Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Investigating Natufian ritual feasting

  1. #1
    Moderator Achievements:
    Three FriendsTagger First Class1 year registered50000 Experience Points
    Awards:
    Master Tagger
    Jovialis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-05-17
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,813
    Points
    89,460
    Level
    93
    Points: 89,460, Level: 93
    Level completed: 6%, Points required for next Level: 1,790
    Overall activity: 99.3%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1a1a2b1 (R-F1794)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H6a1b

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States



    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.

    Investigating Natufian ritual feasting



    Fermented beverage and food storage in 13,000 y-old stone mortars at Raqefet Cave, Israel: Investigating Natufian ritual feasting

    Abstract


    Fermented and alcoholic beverages played a pivotal role in feastings and social events in past agricultural and urban societies across the globe, but the origins of the sophisticated relevant technologies remain elusive. It has long been speculated that the thirst for beer may have been the stimulus behind cereal domestication, which led to a major social-technological change in human history; but this hypothesis has been highly controversial. We report here of the earliest archaeological evidence for cereal-based beer brewing by a semi-sedentary, foraging people. The current project incorporates experimental study, contextual examination, and use-wear and residue analyses of three stone mortars from a Natufian burial site at Raqefet Cave, Israel (13,700–11,700 cal. BP). The results of the analyses indicate that the Natufians exploited at least seven plant taxa, including wheat or barley, oat, legumes and bast fibers (including flax). They packed plant-foods, including malted wheat/barley, in fiber-made containers and stored them in boulder mortars. They used bedrock mortars for pounding and cooking plant-foods, including brewing wheat/barley-based beer likely served in ritual feasts ca. 13,000 years ago. These innovations predated the appearance of domesticated cereals by several millennia in the Near East.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...468?via%3Dihub

    Article:

    https://phys.org/news/2018-09-eviden...e-cereals.html

  2. #2
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    15,329
    Points
    280,805
    Level
    100
    Points: 280,805, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post
    Fermented beverage and food storage in 13,000 y-old stone mortars at Raqefet Cave, Israel: Investigating Natufian ritual feasting

    Abstract


    Fermented and alcoholic beverages played a pivotal role in feastings and social events in past agricultural and urban societies across the globe, but the origins of the sophisticated relevant technologies remain elusive. It has long been speculated that the thirst for beer may have been the stimulus behind cereal domestication, which led to a major social-technological change in human history; but this hypothesis has been highly controversial. We report here of the earliest archaeological evidence for cereal-based beer brewing by a semi-sedentary, foraging people. The current project incorporates experimental study, contextual examination, and use-wear and residue analyses of three stone mortars from a Natufian burial site at Raqefet Cave, Israel (13,700–11,700 cal. BP). The results of the analyses indicate that the Natufians exploited at least seven plant taxa, including wheat or barley, oat, legumes and bast fibers (including flax). They packed plant-foods, including malted wheat/barley, in fiber-made containers and stored them in boulder mortars. They used bedrock mortars for pounding and cooking plant-foods, including brewing wheat/barley-based beer likely served in ritual feasts ca. 13,000 years ago. These innovations predated the appearance of domesticated cereals by several millennia in the Near East.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...468?via%3Dihub

    Article:

    https://phys.org/news/2018-09-eviden...e-cereals.html
    So, the Natufians were first to produce beer, and all before the domestication of grains. How fascinating! It was quite a labor intensive process, too. I wonder how they first figured it out? Someone put some wild grains in water, left it all out in the sun, and decided to drink the water even though it smelled funny? :) The rest, as they say, is history.

    Who was it who, a while ago, was so insistent that it was the Indo-Europeans who invented beer, and it gave them an advantage because it made them better warriors? Next, some of these people will be saying they invented fire. Honestly, that opinion was not only in contravention of the fact that we knew it had to be tied to grains, which the early steppe people didn't have, and that we even have recipes from the great civilizations of the Middle East for making beer, but it's in contravention of basic logic or even common sense. Who would want to go into battle with drunk soldiers?


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  3. #3
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    15,329
    Points
    280,805
    Level
    100
    Points: 280,805, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    So, the Natufians were first to produce beer, and all before the domestication of grains. How fascinating! It was quite a labor intensive process, too. I wonder how they first figured it out? Someone put some wild grains in water, left it all out in the sun, and decided to drink the water even though it smelled funny? :) The rest, as they say, is history.

    Who was it who, a while ago, was so insistent that it was the Indo-Europeans who invented beer, and it gave them an advantage because it made them better warriors? Next, some of these people will be saying they invented fire. Honestly, that opinion was not only in contravention of the fact that we knew it had to be tied to grains, which the early steppe people didn't have, and that we even have recipes from the great civilizations of the Middle East for making beer, but it's in contravention of basic logic or even common sense. Who would want to go into battle with drunk soldiers?
    There's a nice article in Heritage Daily on the findings which contain some nice pictures of the location and the boulder containers as well.
    https://www.heritagedaily.com/2018/0...ft-beer/121637

    "“We exposed a Natufian burial area with about 30 individuals; a wealth of small finds such as flint tools, animal bones and ground stone implements, and about 100 stone mortars and cupmarks. Some of the skeletons are well-preserved and provided direct dates and even human DNA, and we have evidence for flower burials and wakes by the graves."

    I hope the various labs are aware of the former, and the latter gives me hope for mankind. It's not always about conquest and rape and other horrors.

    "The use-wear patterns and microbotanical assemblage suggest that two of the three examined boulder mortars were used as storage containers for plant foods – including wheat/barley malts. Likely, they were covered with lids, probably made of stone slabs and other materials. The foods are likely to have been placed in baskets made of bast fibers for easy handing. The deep narrow shafts may have provided cool conditions suitable for storing food, especially for keeping cereal malts.Combining use-wear and residue data, the third mortar studied was interpreted as a multi-functional vessel for food preparation, which included pounding plant foods and brewing wheat/barley-based beer, probably with legumes and other plants as additive ingredients.
    The evidence of beer brewing at Raqefet Cave 13,000 years ago provides yet another example of the complex Natufian social and ritual realms. Beer brewing may have been, at least in part, an underlying motivation to cultivate cereals in the southern Levant, supporting the beer hypothesis proposed by archaeologists more than 60 years ago."
    I don't think there's any proof really for that last statement.

    [IMG][/IMG]





  4. #4
    Advisor Achievements:
    Three FriendsVeteran25000 Experience Points
    bicicleur's Avatar
    Join Date
    27-01-13
    Location
    Zwevegem, Belgium
    Posts
    5,334
    Points
    45,963
    Level
    66
    Points: 45,963, Level: 66
    Level completed: 30%, Points required for next Level: 987
    Overall activity: 45.0%


    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    It has long been speculated that the thirst for beer may have been the stimulus behind cereal domestication.

    Well, I like beer, but let's not overestimate it.
    I think Natufians liked cereals because it is easy to store and keep for a long time, as food reserve.
    Beer must have been a nice by-product.

  5. #5
    Moderator Achievements:
    Three FriendsTagger First Class1 year registered50000 Experience Points
    Awards:
    Master Tagger
    Jovialis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-05-17
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,813
    Points
    89,460
    Level
    93
    Points: 89,460, Level: 93
    Level completed: 6%, Points required for next Level: 1,790
    Overall activity: 99.3%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b1a1a2b1 (R-F1794)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H6a1b

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States



    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    So, the Natufians were first to produce beer, and all before the domestication of grains. How fascinating! It was quite a labor intensive process, too. I wonder how they first figured it out? Someone put some wild grains in water, left it all out in the sun, and decided to drink the water even though it smelled funny? :) The rest, as they say, is history.

    Who was it who, a while ago, was so insistent that it was the Indo-Europeans who invented beer, and it gave them an advantage because it made them better warriors? Next, some of these people will be saying they invented fire. Honestly, that opinion was not only in contravention of the fact that we knew it had to be tied to grains, which the early steppe people didn't have, and that we even have recipes from the great civilizations of the Middle East for making beer, but it's in contravention of basic logic or even common sense. Who would want to go into battle with drunk soldiers?


    I recall that, someone also tried to say it was the equivalent to "fire water" used by Europeans on the Amerindians.

    It is interesting that beer was used for spiritual applications for funerals. I guess it helped to ease the emotional pain of the bereaved.

  6. #6
    Advisor Achievements:
    Three FriendsVeteran25000 Experience Points
    bicicleur's Avatar
    Join Date
    27-01-13
    Location
    Zwevegem, Belgium
    Posts
    5,334
    Points
    45,963
    Level
    66
    Points: 45,963, Level: 66
    Level completed: 30%, Points required for next Level: 987
    Overall activity: 45.0%


    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post


    I recall that, someone also tried to say it was the equivalent to "fire water" used by Europeans on the Amerindians.

    It is interesting that beer was used for spiritual applications for funerals. I guess it helped to ease the emotional pain of the bereaved.
    I guess that not only the consumption of beer, but also the production of beer was a ritual, it had to be consumed right after the brewing, they couldn't keep and store it till next event.

  7. #7
    Princess Achievements:
    Overdrive10000 Experience PointsVeteranThree Friends
    davef's Avatar
    Join Date
    19-06-16
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    2,218
    Points
    11,238
    Level
    31
    Points: 11,238, Level: 31
    Level completed: 99%, Points required for next Level: 12
    Overall activity: 11.0%


    Ethnic group
    Italian,Irish,Jewish
    Country: USA - New York



    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    So, the Natufians were first to produce beer, and all before the domestication of grains. How fascinating! It was quite a labor intensive process, too. I wonder how they first figured it out? Someone put some wild grains in water, left it all out in the sun, and decided to drink the water even though it smelled funny? :) The rest, as they say, is history.

    Who was it who, a while ago, was so insistent that it was the Indo-Europeans who invented beer, and it gave them an advantage because it made them better warriors? Next, some of these people will be saying they invented fire. Honestly, that opinion was not only in contravention of the fact that we knew it had to be tied to grains, which the early steppe people didn't have, and that we even have recipes from the great civilizations of the Middle East for making beer, but it's in contravention of basic logic or even common sense. Who would want to go into battle with drunk soldiers?
    I'm sure drunken indo European warriors would've had trouble driving their chariots or staying on their steeds. Lol. Next someone will say they invented horses.
    mmmmmmmmm dooouuughhhnuuuutz

  8. #8
    Regular Member Achievements:
    Three Friends1 year registered25000 Experience Points
    Awards:
    Community Award
    Salento's Avatar
    Join Date
    30-05-17
    Posts
    2,700
    Points
    28,701
    Level
    52
    Points: 28,701, Level: 52
    Level completed: 5%, Points required for next Level: 1,049
    Overall activity: 99.2%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    T1a2 -Z19945
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H12a

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States



    Investigating Natufian ritual feasting

    Quote Originally Posted by davef View Post
    I'm sure drunken indo European warriors would've had trouble driving their chariots or staying on their steeds. Lol. Next someone will say they invented horses.
    But who invented the Mules?
    They are Half Horses too, but they are Steriles. True!
    I say that somebody invented the Half Horses! LOL :)
    But you oh Messapo, Tamer of Horses ... that no one, with neither iron nor fire can break down! “Virgil”

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •