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Thread: Intact Early Mycenaean Tomb Discovered in Greece

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    Intact Early Mycenaean Tomb Discovered in Greece



    An intact tomb from the early Mycenaean era (1650-1400 BC) has been unearthed by archaeologists in the region of Nemea, southern Greece.

    According to the Culture Ministry, the tomb is among the largest ever found in the region and is set apart by the short yet wide path leading to its entrance along with other features that place it in the early phase of the Mycenaean civilization.

    It was found in a Mycenaean cemetery in Aidonia. The Mycenaean civilization, with its palatial states, urban organization, sophisticated art and writing system, flourished in Greece in the 17th-12th centuries BC.

    http://www.ekathimerini.com/233296/a...rthed-in-nemea

    AIDONIA, GREECE—According to an Ekathimerini report, a large, intact tomb dating to the early Mycenaean era (1650-1400 B.C.) has been discovered in a cemetery at the ancient site of Nemea in southern Greece by a team of researchers from the Ephorate of Antiquities of Corinth, the University of Graz, and the University of California, Berkeley. A wide path leads to the tomb entrance and a rounded room. The oldest burials were recovered from four large pits dug into the floor of the burial chamber that had been covered with megaliths. Decorated pottery, copper knives, swords, arrows, obsidian, pins, jewelry, and seal stones were also recovered from the pits. During the late Mycenaean period (1400-1200 B.C.), bodies are thought to have been placed on the floor of the tomb. The eventual collapse of the tomb’s roof in antiquity helped to protect the site. To read about the recent discovery of another Mycenaean tomb, go to “A Monumental Find.”

    https://www.archaeology.org/news/701...mycenaean-tomb
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    2 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post
    An intact tomb from the early Mycenaean era (1650-1400 BC) has been unearthed by archaeologists in the region of Nemea, southern Greece.

    According to the Culture Ministry, the tomb is among the largest ever found in the region and is set apart by the short yet wide path leading to its entrance along with other features that place it in the early phase of the Mycenaean civilization.

    It was found in a Mycenaean cemetery in Aidonia. The Mycenaean civilization, with its palatial states, urban organization, sophisticated art and writing system, flourished in Greece in the 17th-12th centuries BC.

    http://www.ekathimerini.com/233296/a...rthed-in-nemea

    AIDONIA, GREECE—According to an Ekathimerini report, a large, intact tomb dating to the early Mycenaean era (1650-1400 B.C.) has been discovered in a cemetery at the ancient site of Nemea in southern Greece by a team of researchers from the Ephorate of Antiquities of Corinth, the University of Graz, and the University of California, Berkeley. A wide path leads to the tomb entrance and a rounded room. The oldest burials were recovered from four large pits dug into the floor of the burial chamber that had been covered with megaliths. Decorated pottery, copper knives, swords, arrows, obsidian, pins, jewelry, and seal stones were also recovered from the pits. During the late Mycenaean period (1400-1200 B.C.), bodies are thought to have been placed on the floor of the tomb. The eventual collapse of the tomb’s roof in antiquity helped to protect the site. To read about the recent discovery of another Mycenaean tomb, go to “A Monumental Find.”

    https://www.archaeology.org/news/701...mycenaean-tomb
    So, I'm assuming there are remains. Now we'll be able to see if perhaps the "steppe" component was higher in the early Mycenaean Era. It would be great to find out if they were Z2103 or R1a, probably Z93.


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    Hopefully the remains get tested.

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