Quote Originally Posted by Pip View Post
But the Steppe ancestors of Bell Beaker did not pass through the extant populations without admixing. Their best-fit admixture is wholly with Anatolian and East European EEF.
So maybe a bit of Trypillia after all? I can concede that.

Quote Originally Posted by Pip View Post
There is little or no sign of exogamous admixture with West European populations (another myth).
Of course. All scientists agree that their migration was an extremely sudden and sweeping one. It would have taken them some time to mix with the locals. The earliest samples can't have much "local" in them, for lack of time. On the other hand, emerging - as you contend - in France, thenmoving back east toHungary, without developing any admixture with the locals seems rather improbable.

Quote Originally Posted by Pip View Post
I don't know where the culture itself came from, but the L51 people who had principally adopted it by the time of the Bell Beaker expansion had been bottlenecked and were almost certainly derived from one small isolated East European population
I don't know about the bottleneck. Isolated? Maybe. But I very much doubt that a "small population" could have overrun most of western Europe, from Hungary to Spain to Britain within a time frame of three to four generations. East European population? For sure, very much so, considering where they plot on PCAs.

Quote Originally Posted by Pip View Post
There are signs of a little Ezero-like admixture in them, but none that I can see from Baden, Minoa, Myceanae or LBK.
That's what I am saying. That's the reason I cited those (counter-)examples. The newcomers didn't stem from the heavily admixed populations that had resulted from the earlier advances of steppe people into the Balkans in the late 4th millenium BC. Their percentage of steppe would have been greatly diluted by 2500 BC. Any PCA you'll look at will show you that Unetice plots far too close to Yamna for the "steppe Bell Beakers" to have been largely admixed before arriving in central Europe. Their steppe ancestry was too high for them to have sojourned among farmers for a very long time. Hence: they came from the steppe.