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Thread: Cuisine of the Val Parmense

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    3 out of 4 members found this post helpful.

    Cuisine of the Val Parmense







    Fried polenta wedges


    Polenta bowl with eggs and greens


    Tortelli stuffed with ricotta cheese and uvetta with parmigiano sauce and crisped prosciutto or pancetta. We also stuff them with a mixture of meat, grated cheese and sauteed greens, or a mashed potatoe puree with leeks and grated cheese, which is outstanding as well.


    Tagliatelle with truffles



    Tortellini in brodo


    Spaghetti with copa ham


    Tagliatelle with fresh mushrooms


    Risotto is eaten a lot, usually just plain with lots of butter and grated parmigiano, but they add whatever they have or can forage: mushrooms, crisped pork products, and in their short growing season, whatever vegetables they have, i.e. asparagus, greens, courgettes etc.



    Chestnut flour tortelli with crisped pancetta or prosciutto. Usually it was a ricotta filling.


    Cavatelli with wild boar ragu:


    If you're looking for tomato sauce, you're out of luck. :)


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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Cucina of the Val Parmense "secondi"

    Cotechino sausage: it's a pork sausage very common in Emilia Romagna. It's often served with a buttery potatoe puree.


    Polenta with sauteed mushrooms


    We eat a lot of chicken and rabbit and wild game, all served with polenta or potato puree for the sauce, or sometimes roasted in the oven with potatoes. Actually, they try not to eat chickens very often, because they're needed for eggs, and when they're really old, for broth.


    Grilled meats:



    Polenta with wild boar stew


    Pork with pearl onions and balsamic sauce


    Polenta with meat ragu


    Stuffed veal breast



    It's all about the stuffing.


    Sauteed seasonal vegetables.



    They pickle a lot of vegetables and dry a lot of fruit at the harvest.

    The only fish is trout, very simply prepared, and baccala:


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    Here's something interesting:

    In Salento, some elderly people refuse to eat Polenta.
    It's not just because Polenta is not part of the local tradition.
    Believe it or not, they associate Polenta with poverty. (bad memories)
    Around the end of ww2, and for 4-5 years after that, they practically ate polenta almost every day.
    Or so they say.

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Cucina of the Val Parmense "secondi"

    Cotechino sausage: it's a pork sausage very common in Emilia Romagna. It's often served with a buttery potatoe puree.


    Polenta with sauteed mushrooms


    We eat a lot of chicken and rabbit and wild game, all served with polenta or potato puree for the sauce, or sometimes roasted in the oven with potatoes. Actually, they try not to eat chickens very often, because they're needed for eggs, and when they're really old, for broth.


    Grilled meats:



    Polenta with wild boar stew


    Pork with pearl onions and balsamic sauce


    Polenta with meat ragu


    Stuffed veal breast



    It's all about the stuffing.


    Sauteed seasonal vegetables.



    They pickle a lot of vegetables and dry a lot of fruit at the harvest.

    The only fish is trout, very simply prepared, and baccala:


    Gida, if the harassment doesn't stop, your IP address will be reported to spam services. Don't make me do it.
    Thanks for the post Angela, ‘mi ha fatto venire l’acquolina in bocca...’


    Sent from my iPhone using Eupedia Forum

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    Here's something interesting:

    In Salento, some elderly people refuse to eat Polenta.
    It's not just because Polenta is not part of the local tradition.
    Believe it or not, they associate Polenta with poverty. (bad memories)
    Around the end of ww2, and for 4-5 years after that, they practically ate polenta almost every day.
    Or so they say.
    They're not far wrong. It was a bulk staple of the poor, as pasta made from just flour and water (without the eggs we add) was the bulk staple of the poor in the south.

    The real poverty food of the north is chestnuts. A lot of mountainous land is unsuitable for grain, but chestnuts are abundant, so as well as eating them boiled and roasted, they dried them and used the flour to make pasta, crepes, etc. I have to admit that while I'm crazy about boiled or roasted chestnuts, I don't really like pasta made from chestnut flour: it's just too sweet for me.

    Even down in the Lunigiana that's all they ate during the war, just roasted, or boiled into mush, into which they'd add foraged greens or whatever they could find and a little oil. My great aunt, God rest her soul, wouldn't touch them after the war, not even at the Pattona festival. She'd go with me because I do like chestnut flour crepes, but she wouldn't eat them. :)




    Funny story about Polenta. In my valley in the Lunigiana, the all black regiment of American soldiers passed through, staying about a week. They loved soft polenta mush, but they asked for milk and sugar with it, which we absolutely never did.

    Years later in Charleston I had an uppity waiter start to explain to me that grits were a type of polenta. I said, "I know; I was raised on it." I didn't add that most of the grits I'd eaten on our trip down were disgusting. To be fair, what he brought out, made from unbleached ground corn meal, and loaded with butter and well seasoned, and with sauteed shrimp on them, was delicious.



    It's like when an equally uppity waiter in the Napa Valley tried to explain to my father how to eat an artichoke. He said, young man, I was eating them before you were born. :)

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    I've had polenta recently, it was really good!

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    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jovialis View Post
    I've had polenta recently, it was really good!
    Like most bulk starches, it all depends what you add to it. If you have a good palate and some creativity you can make almost anything taste good.

    Even southern style breakfast grits can be good with enough butter, salt and pepper, although it would be better with grated parmigiano and some melting cheese imo. :)


    I had this once and it was very good: grits, sausage and cheese casserole.


    The only thing I don't like is the grits made from bleached corn meal that's also been refined so much that the end product is like cream of wheat. All the butter in the world won't save it for me. Beware of Waffle House grits!

    Given the food on which I grew up, I love corn bread in all varieties too.

    Polenta is really just the "puls" or porridge of the Romans, although made with New World yellow corn instead of Old World farro wheat, millet, chick peas or even chestnuts.

    I've eaten farro porridge at my friend's house, who is a health food nut. It's really good. I may start making it.

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    Risotto is one of the best things I've ever had (and I could've had it last weekend while recovering from having three wisdom teeth removed but still got by on cottage cheese lol)
    mmmmmmmmm dooouuughhhnuuuutz

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    This is one of the tastiest threads ever appeared in the history of the Web. Thanks, Angela

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuvanè View Post
    This is one of the tastiest threads ever appeared in the history of the Web. Thanks, Angela

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    I would expect nothing less from a Romagnolo. :)

    If you like hiking, fishing, or cross country skiing, or even just animal watching, you should go. The food really is delicious, and very cheap for what you get.

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    My stomach is growling furiously! :)

    Polenta is delicious and I'm a big fan of comfort foods like that. My old roommate from my younger days was 1/2 Italian. His mother was from the Bolzano/Bolzen area and she'd invite us over for northern Italian cuisine. It was interesting how she'd be able to switch gears linguistically at the dining room table. She could go from English, to Italian to German seamlessly. Anyways, I'm super hungry right now and that meat tray in the top photo looks particularly inviting.

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by matty74 View Post
    My stomach is growling furiously! :)

    Polenta is delicious and I'm a big fan of comfort foods like that. My old roommate from my younger days was 1/2 Italian. His mother was from the Bolzano/Bolzen area and she'd invite us over for northern Italian cuisine. It was interesting how she'd be able to switch gears linguistically at the dining room table. She could go from English, to Italian to German seamlessly. Anyways, I'm super hungry right now and that meat tray in the top photo looks particularly inviting.
    I love cured pork products too. In fact, when I was a child I was the Italian version of the "picky eater" child who drives parents crazy. I was what my parents thought would be their only child, and the only child in our apartment building, so I was spoiled rotten. All I ate was cured pork products, i.e. mortadella and what we call copa, usually, which were my favorites, bread, and cheese. I liked fruit too, cherries and grapes and apricots when they were in season, and that's it.

    My mother thought I'd sicken and die because I kept getting colds and tonsillitis, and since I wouldn't eat eggs and would start gagging if I so much as smelled one cooking, she would make me zabaglione every morning, which is made of egg yolk, sugar, maybe a little coffee or sweet wine. Here they serve it as dessert, and I had to be begged to eat it. Ah...nostalgia.

    Of course, I never let my own children get away with that. :)

    Zabaglione

    4 egg yolks
    1/4 cup sugar
    Some marsala or vin santo or similar wine, up to 1/2 cup for adults.

    DIRECTIONS


    • First, set up a double boiler. Set a saucepan of water on the stove, and bring it to a simmer. Ensure that a large glass bowl will fit in/on top of the saucepan later.
    • In the glass bowl, whisk together (either by hand or with an electric hand mixer) egg yolks and sugar until pale yellow and creamy. Set on top of the pot of simmering water. Add marsala and continue to beat until custard forms soft mounds, 15 minutes or less. Note: this will foam up and double or triple in volume during cooking. Serve atop sliced fruit or plain cake (pound cake, angel food cake, etc.)




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    1 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
    Some more from my files:

    Potato gnocchi with meat sauce


    Cheese and greens stuffed green ravioli (dough has some spinach) dressed with butter and grated parmigiano
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Deep fried tortelloni stuffed with mashed potatoes, porri, grated cheese and egg. This is part of the reason some of them get portly with old age.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Crepes with mushrooms and cream and truffle sauce
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Pork fillets with cream and truffle sauce
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Half moon pasta stuffed with ricotta and walnuts and dressed with melted cheese.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Tagliolini with sausage and chestnut sauce
    [IMG][/IMG

    Fried lamb chops (in season, of course)
    [IMG][/IMG]

    I love this: Tagliata (beef) with a salad and shaved grana cheese.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Our version of meat and potatoes. I still make it all the time.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Spongata:
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Chestnut crepes: you can pour honey over them
    [IMG][/IMG]

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