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Thread: Ancient dna of humans and their pathogens

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    Ancient dna of humans and their pathogens

    upcoming :

    https://carta.anthropogeny.org/event...heir-pathogens

    ANCIENT DNA OF HUMANS AND THEIR PATHOGENS
    Event:
    CARTA 10th Anniversary: Revisiting the Agenda
    Session Date:
    Mar 23, 2019
    Venue Space:
    Salk Institute - Conrad T. Prebys Auditorium
    Speakers:
    Anne Stone
    Advances in method of ancient DNA analysis over the past ten years have transformed our views of human interactions and migrations as well as of the evolutionary dynamics of several of our pathogens. We now know that admixture among archaic and modern humans was common and that human populations have been quite dynamic, both in terms of migrations and admixture and in terms of rapid allele changes that enable environmental adaptation. Questions that remain include what was the role of selection after admixture between archaic and modern humans, how has climate change affected human diversity in the past, can we understand selective pressures on complex traits over time, and what was the diversity and structure of ancient African populations? Ancient DNA has also presented surprises about the emergence of some human pathogens; for example, Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague, has affected humans for much longer than expected, while M. tuberculosis, causing TB, appears to have jumped into humans more recently than previously thought. What may be impossible to know are how these population dynamics (for both humans and pathogens) played out in environments, such as the tropics, where DNA preservation is poor. In addition, some pathogens, such as single stranded RNA viruses may not preserve in any (or most) environments because of their rapid degradation after death. Insights from other ancient biomolecules, including proteins, and additional methodological improvements may overcome some of these obstacles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur View Post
    upcoming :

    https://carta.anthropogeny.org/event...heir-pathogens

    ANCIENT DNA OF HUMANS AND THEIR PATHOGENS
    Event:
    CARTA 10th Anniversary: Revisiting the Agenda
    Session Date:
    Mar 23, 2019
    Venue Space:
    Salk Institute - Conrad T. Prebys Auditorium
    Speakers:
    Anne Stone
    Advances in method of ancient DNA analysis over the past ten years have transformed our views of human interactions and migrations as well as of the evolutionary dynamics of several of our pathogens. We now know that admixture among archaic and modern humans was common and that human populations have been quite dynamic, both in terms of migrations and admixture and in terms of rapid allele changes that enable environmental adaptation. Questions that remain include what was the role of selection after admixture between archaic and modern humans, how has climate change affected human diversity in the past, can we understand selective pressures on complex traits over time, and what was the diversity and structure of ancient African populations? Ancient DNA has also presented surprises about the emergence of some human pathogens; for example, Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague, has affected humans for much longer than expected, while M. tuberculosis, causing TB, appears to have jumped into humans more recently than previously thought. What may be impossible to know are how these population dynamics (for both humans and pathogens) played out in environments, such as the tropics, where DNA preservation is poor. In addition, some pathogens, such as single stranded RNA viruses may not preserve in any (or most) environments because of their rapid degradation after death. Insights from other ancient biomolecules, including proteins, and additional methodological improvements may overcome some of these obstacles.
    I wonder how recent is recent for TB. Y pestis is, what, around 3500 BC?

    I thought TB was associated with the early Neolithic.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I wonder how recent is recent for TB. Y pestis is, what, around 3500 BC?

    I thought TB was associated with the early Neolithic.
    you pointed out once that out of Africa men 100 ka would have caried M. tuberculosis
    maybe it is later

    I guess there is also a difference between carying M. tuberculosis and a new mutation causing an outbreak of TB
    afaik earliest signs of an outbreak found was in Atlit Yam, Levantine PPNB

    I guess, if you follow the conference they'll tell you their findings

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    0 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur View Post
    you pointed out once that out of Africa men 100 ka would have caried M. tuberculosis
    maybe it is later

    I guess there is also a difference between carying M. tuberculosis and a new mutation causing an outbreak of TB
    afaik earliest signs of an outbreak found was in Atlit Yam, Levantine PPNB

    I guess, if you follow the conference they'll tell you their findings
    Yes, I'll try to follow it to see if they straighten out the conflicting papers, or maybe, as you say, they only seem to be conflicting.

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