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Thread: Dairy consumption and height

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I don't know if they grow near the Veneto, but in Toscana and Liguria we eat a lot of pine nuts. They cost a fortune nowadays. :) If they didn't have them in Italy perhaps at least they heard of them?
    They're an essential ingredient of pesto, and we make cookies with them, my absolute favorites. :)



    You have to find an Emilian restaurant, or better yet go there. If you like nature, there's nowhere better than the Parco dei Cento Laghi, for example.
    I got wine at mealtimes when I was little, although usually "baptized" wine with some water. There's even a picture of me tipping a straw wine bottle to my mouth. That kind of wine is about 4 % alcohol, so mixed with water it's harmless. It certainly did me no harm. :) Fwiw, I don't ever drink more than two glasses of wine at a time, and I abhor drunkenness. I think you either have a predisposition toward alcoholism, in which case you shouldn't drink, or you don't.
    I had coffee too although I didn't drink it. It went into my zabaglione every morning. Did I mention I was horribly spoiled? :) Yes, by my nonna as well. She would see to it I got mostly everything I wanted. No switch from the willow tree for me, which she used to keep her seven rambunctious boys in line. To be fair I would never have dreamed of doing the kinds of things her boys had done. Even more so than most little girls in my world, I was very proper and well behaved. :)
    I confess I've never heard about them. My parents don't know either. I just learned with you that they exist. :) Interesting that they do are somewhat similar to our "pinhão", however, smaller. I wonder if the taste is also similar.
    Check its size:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ku5h4iAXCCM

    Pinhão is not too expensive. I guess it costs more or less $3 / kg.
    I just learned too that pine nuts are used in the original pesto. I always thought the "soul" of pesto was basically walnuts, basil, olive oil and parmesan.
    Thanks for the tip of restaurant. You bet I'm going there someday. Btw, I guess one of the best restaurants in the world is in Emilia-Romagna, no? In Modena, more specifically.

    Well, my parents did drink wine, and I'm sure it didn't affect them. But nowadays they drink too few for two "Oriundi". je je je I myself didn't drink it when I was a child, but I became a fan in adulthood. I taste it twice a week, more or less. Half a bottle at a time.
    There are still relatives at countryside who produce wine with their own grapes, but it's not done exactly for "enthusiasts". It's a more simple kind of wine, done basically with Vitis labrusca and hybrid labrusca and vinifera. It's fruity, aromatic, without much complexity, and it must be drunk young. Most of Brazilian wines are done with this kind of grape, but of course we have lots Vitis vinifera wines as well, mainly in Rio Grande do Sul. I like Vitis labrusca's, especially 'cause they evoke memories of childhood, but of course I prefer those elaborated with Vitis vinifera.

    You're still proper and well behaved. :)
    I wish I've been spoiled by my grandparents, 'cause it would mean knowing them. I did know one, at least. Unfortunately, three passed away well before my birth.
    Love coffee btw. Here the traditional is boiled, but I also drink espresso - generally Nespresso.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    I confess I've never heard about them. My parents don't know either. I just learned with you that they exist. :) Interesting that they do are somewhat similar to our "pinhão", however, smaller. I wonder if the taste is also similar.
    Check its size:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ku5h4iAXCCM

    Pinhão is not too expensive. I guess it costs more or less $3 / kg.
    I just learned too that pine nuts are used in the original pesto. I always thought the "soul" of pesto was basically walnuts, basil, olive oil and parmesan.
    Thanks for the tip of restaurant. You bet I'm going there someday. Btw, I guess one of the best restaurants in the world is in Emilia-Romagna, no? In Modena, more specifically.

    Well, my parents did drink wine, and I'm sure it didn't affect them. But nowadays they drink too few for two "Oriundi". je je je I myself didn't drink it when I was a child, but I became a fan in adulthood. I taste it twice a week, more or less. Half a bottle at a time.
    There are still relatives at countryside who produce wine with their own grapes, but it's not done exactly for "enthusiasts". It's a more simple kind of wine, done basically with Vitis labrusca and hybrid labrusca and vinifera. It's fruity, aromatic, without much complexity, and it must be drunk young. Most of Brazilian wines are done with this kind of grape, but of course we have lots Vitis vinifera wines as well, mainly in Rio Grande do Sul. I like Vitis labrusca's, especially 'cause they evoke memories of childhood, but of course I prefer those elaborated with Vitis vinifera.

    You're still proper and well behaved. :)
    I wish I've been spoiled by my grandparents, 'cause it would mean knowing them. I did know one, at least. Unfortunately, three passed away well before my birth.
    Love coffee btw. Here the traditional is boiled, but I also drink espresso - generally Nespresso.
    Yes, Osteria Francescana is indeed one of the best if not the best restaurant in the world, but while I would love to eat there once, I have to confess that I prefer our original food. :) He has said that the locals wanted to crucify him for destroying the cooking of their nonnas. I'm sure some still do.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Co1wzJ0Eg84

    This is a very nice exploration of the food and art of Emilia Romagna: Bologna, aptly called "La Grassa", but also Ferrara, Modena, and Parma.


    The best food in Italy, imo, closely followed by the food of Napoli.
    Last edited by Angela; 19-04-19 at 14:19.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Yes, Osteria Francescana is indeed one of the best if not the best restaurant in the world, but while I would love to eat there once, I have to confess that I prefer our original food. :) He has said that the locals wanted to crucify him for destroying the cooking of their nonnas. I'm sure some still do.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Co1wzJ0Eg84
    This is a very nice exploration of the food and art of Emilia Romagna: Bologna, aptly called "La Grassa", but also Ferrara, Modena, and Parma.

    The best food in Italy, imo, closely followed by the food of Napoli.
    I'm convinced the cousine Emiliana explains Pavarotti. ;)

    Thanks for the video. I'll watch it tonight more carefully. Now my little dude here wants atention. At least he let me type this one. :)

    Generally I prefer traditional food to the "generic" or "adapted" one, too, but I confess I've never tried a real sophisticated food, of these fancy restaurants. So don't know if I'd like it more.

    One of the most traditinal items of the culinary of my birth area is the "galeto al primo canto".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    I'm convinced the cousine Emiliana explains Pavarotti. ;)

    Thanks for the video. I'll watch it tonight more carefully. Now my little dude here wants atention. At least he let me type this one. :)

    Generally I prefer traditional food to the "generic" or "adapted" one, too, but I confess I've never tried a real sophisticated food, of these fancy restaurants. So don't know if I'd like it more.

    One of the most traditinal items of the culinary of my birth area is the "galeto al primo canto".
    The musical tradition also inspired his soul. :) Verdi is a religion there, as Puccini is in neighboring Toscana. They love opera too.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkzGOF3COYo

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    Just out, avg. height for late highschool boys in one city 187.6cm. Crazy, this must be the result of recent selection. Nutrition isn't enough imo.




    I'll never go there.

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    It’s always been known that the Dutch and Frisian towns here in the Midwest have always been stellar at basketball, volleyball or football. Lots of big, tall, athletic kids

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    "Skeptical Face" There's nothing more sacred than Cheese and Wine in my neck of the woods but we still aint as tall as the Dutch..


    Although that could be because of Soviet and Russian empire famines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by regerugged View Post
    Really incredible.I think this is because dairy has growth hormones. It makes you taller but it's also cancer promoting or something.
    That may well be part of the story, but growth hormones are a modern development. Dutch heights were increasing long before the 1970's.
    -Vandemonian, earlier in this thread

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    the dutch may have been small in the 1800s but i dont believe that was always the case. infact all this banter of comparing modern populations to people from a few hundred years ago draws a narrow conclusion.

    basically the potential for growth was always there its just our modern high fat/carb diet can give growing teens the fuel they need.

    how else could these 7ft kurgans exist in the past if everyone was 5'0 ?

    caesar mentioned the brits were a head taller than the romans. they were 6 footers.

    its also has a racial/ ethnic component. some groups no matter how much milk they drink will never be the size of the dutch.

    Sent from my SM-G977B using Tapatalk

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