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Thread: Population history of the U.S.

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    Ethnic group
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    Country: USA - New York



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    Population history of the U.S.

    See:Chengzhen L. Dai1
    Population histories of the United States revealed through fine-scale migration and2 haplotype analysis

    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/bior...77411.full.pdf

    The data source is Nat Geo project.

    All of the results are based on haplotype sharing and are similar to what 23andme found in their massive study based on their own clients.

    Accurate according to where the signals would be strongest:




    The New Mexico cluster has an older history here than the descendants of The Mayflower.

    This is also interesting.


    The Italian numbers would be based on Southern Italians/Sicilians primarily. If a lot of Northern and Central Italians were added, the number would change.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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    I think it's important to combine such statistics with a good understanding of migration to and within the United States. For instance, in the 1850's large numbers of Germans from Holstein, in northern Germany, emigrated en masse to southeastern Iowa. The story of Scandanavian emigration to Minnesota is perhaps too well known to repeat. Within the country there are migration patterns that kept similar groups together. Colonists in Massachusetts, for instance, tended to migrate north, along the Connecticutt river, into Vermont and then west into northern New York state; hardly the most hospitable regions for farmers.

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    The US and maybe Australia and New Zealand to a lesser degree are really melting pots because of the large intermarriage of the different ethnic groups. Yeah maybe the first generation or two they tend to stick to their kind but then they marry outside their group bring us a wonderful diversity.

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    I guess what strikes me about internal migration in America is how, at a particular moment, everyone headed for the same place. In the mid-19th century multiple lines of my family, and that of my wife, migrated to Iowa. Then several lines later migrated to South Dakota, of all places. I suspect the answer as to why was advertising. Land speculators advertised, newspapers hyped the story, and the people went.

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    Country: USA - New York



    Because of marriages with different ethnic groups, this mix of populations turned out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
    I think it's important to combine such statistics with a good understanding of migration to and within the United States. For instance, in the 1850's large numbers of Germans from Holstein, in northern Germany, emigrated en masse to southeastern Iowa. The story of Scandanavian emigration to Minnesota is perhaps too well known to repeat. Within the country there are migration patterns that kept similar groups together. Colonists in Massachusetts, for instance, tended to migrate north, along the Connecticutt river, into Vermont and then west into northern New York state; hardly the most hospitable regions for farmers.
    The different churches that you see in smaller cities along the Mohawk River, for example, if you pay attention, can show you the waves: Dutch Reformed, Episcopalian, Congregationalist, Quaker, Methodist, Roman Catholic, Synagogues.

    I may have the chronology off a bit in the middle. :)

    People forget the massive impact the Canal had on the settling of the country.

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