Theory about late expansion of Finnic languages (I agree with this theory and it is also popular among modern Finnish linguists):

http://www.elisanet.fi/alkupera/Suomensynty.html

Proto-Finnic groups expanded towards the Baltic Sea late, encountering and assimilating earlier Indo-European populations in what is now Estonia and Latvia, and Uralic (Proto-Sami/Lapp) populations in what is now Finland. This explains why Estonians and Southern Finns have high % of Indo-European Corded Ware DNA. Ancient DNA studies so far confirm this theory, showing that N1c was not present in the Baltic States in the Bronze Age, and that Finland was inhabited by a Siberian-admixed Ancient Sami population before the arrival of Finns.

Map 1, Proto-Uralic homeland around year 2000 BC:

http://www.elisanet.fi/alkupera/Suomi1.jpg

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Map 2, West Uralic language around year 1600 BC:

http://www.elisanet.fi/alkupera/Suomi2.jpg

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Map 3, Early Proto-Finnic language around 1200 BC:

http://www.elisanet.fi/alkupera/Suomi3.jpg

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Map 4, Middle Proto-Finnic language around 500 BC:

http://www.elisanet.fi/alkupera/Suomi4.jpg

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Map 5, Late Proto-Finnic language around 200 AD:

http://www.elisanet.fi/alkupera/Suomi6.jpg

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Map 6, Finnic languages around year 600 AD (Estonia was already Finnic, but Livonia in Northern Latvia not yet):

http://www.elisanet.fi/alkupera/Suomi7.jpg

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Map 7, Finnic languages around year 1000 AD (after expansion of Livonian Finnic languages to Northern Latvia):

http://www.elisanet.fi/alkupera/Suomi8.jpg

[spoiler][/spoiler]

Another map of migrations: http://i67.tinypic.com/1z1sjzm.png



And something about Uralic migrations based on ancient DNA:

https://eurogenes.blogspot.com/2018/...kers-work.html