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Thread: More on the Jomon people

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    More on the Jomon people

    See: Late Jomon male and female genome sequences from the Funadomari site in Hokkaido, Japan
    https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article...icle/-char/ja/


    "抄録The Funadomari Jomon people were hunter-gatherers living on Rebun Island, Hokkaido, Japan c. 3500–3800 years ago. In this study, we determined the high-depth and low-depth nuclear genome sequences from a Funadomari Jomon female (F23) and male (F5), respectively. We genotyped the nuclear DNA of F23 and determined the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class-I genotypes and the phenotypic traits. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation in the CPT1A gene was identified in both F23 and F5. The mutation provides metabolic advantages for consumption of a high-fat diet, and its allele frequency is more than 70% in Arctic populations, but is absent elsewhere. This variant may be related to the lifestyle of the Funadomari Jomon people, who fished and hunted land and marine animals. We observed high homozygosity by descent (HBD) in F23, but HBD tracts longer than 10 cM were very limited, suggesting that the population size of Northern Jomon populations were small. Our analysis suggested that population size of the Jomon people started to decrease c. 50000 years ago. The phylogenetic relationship among F23, modern/ancient Eurasians, and Native Americans showed a deep divergence of F23 in East Eurasia, probably before the split of the ancestor of Native Americans from East Eurasians, but after the split of 40000-year-old Tianyuan, indicating that the Northern Jomon people were genetically isolated from continental East Eurasians for a long period. Intriguingly, we found that modern Japanese as well as Ulchi, Korean, aboriginal Taiwanese, and Philippine populations were genetically closer to F23 than to Han Chinese. Moreover, the Y chromosome of F5 belonged to haplogroup D1b2b, which is rare in modern Japanese populations. These findings provided insights into the history and reconstructions of the ancient human population structures in East Eurasia, and the F23 genome data can be considered as the Jomon Reference Genome for future studies."


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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    See: Our analysis suggested that population size of the Jomon people started to decrease c. 50000 years ago. "
    Are they suggesting that there were Jomon people in Japan well before 50,000 years ago, but the population decreased from 50,000 years on? Other studies suggest that 50,000 years ago the ancestors of the Jomon and other East Asian people had barely finished admixing with Neanderthals. Since there were no Neanderthals in the Far East, these ancestors were perhaps more likely to be in South Asia or South East Asia at that time. If they had reached Japan by that date they would have only recently arrived. It doesn't seem likely that the population would then begin decreasing at that time. Perhaps a better explanation is that there was a genetic bottleneck around that time when a small founding population of modern humans reached Japan and became genetically isolated from most other East Asian populations. Not so much a decreasing population size, more a decreased gene pool due to a genetic bottleneck?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamakore View Post
    Are they suggesting that there were Jomon people in Japan well before 50,000 years ago, but the population decreased from 50,000 years on? Other studies suggest that 50,000 years ago the ancestors of the Jomon and other East Asian people had barely finished admixing with Neanderthals. Since there were no Neanderthals in the Far East, these ancestors were perhaps more likely to be in South Asia or South East Asia at that time. If they had reached Japan by that date they would have only recently arrived. It doesn't seem likely that the population would then begin decreasing at that time. Perhaps a better explanation is that there was a genetic bottleneck around that time when a small founding population of modern humans reached Japan and became genetically isolated from most other East Asian populations. Not so much a decreasing population size, more a decreased gene pool due to a genetic bottleneck?
    first humans arrived in Japan, just 37 ka, and they were not the Jomon people
    the ancestors of the Jomon lived elsewhere 50 ka, and my guess is in Sundaland, where they were replaced by the ancestors of the Australian aboriginees, Papuas and Negritos

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    See: Late Jomon male and female genome sequences from the Funadomari site in Hokkaido, Japan
    https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article...icle/-char/ja/


    "抄録The Funadomari Jomon people were hunter-gatherers living on Rebun Island, Hokkaido, Japan c. 3500–3800 years ago. In this study, we determined the high-depth and low-depth nuclear genome sequences from a Funadomari Jomon female (F23) and male (F5), respectively. We genotyped the nuclear DNA of F23 and determined the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class-I genotypes and the phenotypic traits. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation in the CPT1A gene was identified in both F23 and F5. The mutation provides metabolic advantages for consumption of a high-fat diet, and its allele frequency is more than 70% in Arctic populations, but is absent elsewhere. This variant may be related to the lifestyle of the Funadomari Jomon people, who fished and hunted land and marine animals. We observed high homozygosity by descent (HBD) in F23, but HBD tracts longer than 10 cM were very limited, suggesting that the population size of Northern Jomon populations were small. Our analysis suggested that population size of the Jomon people started to decrease c. 50000 years ago. The phylogenetic relationship among F23, modern/ancient Eurasians, and Native Americans showed a deep divergence of F23 in East Eurasia, probably before the split of the ancestor of Native Americans from East Eurasians, but after the split of 40000-year-old Tianyuan, indicating that the Northern Jomon people were genetically isolated from continental East Eurasians for a long period. Intriguingly, we found that modern Japanese as well as Ulchi, Korean, aboriginal Taiwanese, and Philippine populations were genetically closer to F23 than to Han Chinese. Moreover, the Y chromosome of F5 belonged to haplogroup D1b2b, which is rare in modern Japanese populations. These findings provided insights into the history and reconstructions of the ancient human population structures in East Eurasia, and the F23 genome data can be considered as the Jomon Reference Genome for future studies."
    could these people be descendants of the 18 ka Amur river salmon fishers or from nearby northern Sakhalin?
    these people were not Jomon, but similar

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    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur View Post
    could these people be descendants of the 18 ka Amur river salmon fishers or from nearby northern Sakhalin?
    these people were not Jomon, but similar
    I agree: I think that's a strong possibility.

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