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Thread: Centomeres may contain information about ancient dna

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    2 out of 3 members found this post helpful.

    Centomeres may contain information about ancient dna

    Fascinating stuff.

    See:
    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea...-dco061819.php

    "Langley and colleagues Sasha Langley and Gary Karpen at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Karen Miga at UC Santa Cruz reasoned that there could be haplotypes -- groups of genes that are inherited together in human evolution -- that stretch over vast portions of our genomes, and even across the centromere.That's because the centromere does not participate in the "crossover" process that occurs when cells divide to form sperm or eggs. During crossover, paired chromosomes line up next to each other and their limbs cross, sometimes cutting and splicing DNA between them so that genes can be shuffled. But crossovers drop to zero near centromeres. Without that shuffling in every generation, centromeres might preserve very ancient stretches of DNA intact."

    "Turning to human DNA, the researchers looked at centromere sequences from the 1000 Genomes Project, a public catalog of human variation. They discovered haplotypes spanning the centromeres in all the human chromosomes.

    Haplotypes from half a million years ago
    In the X chromosome in these genome sequences, they found several major centromeric haplotypes representing lineages stretching back a half a million years. In the genome as a whole, most of the diversity is seen among African genomes consistent with the more recent spread of humans out of the African continent. One of the oldest centromere haplotype lineages was not carried by those early emigrants.
    In chromosome 11, they found highly diverged haplotypes of Neanderthal DNA in non-African genomes. These haplotypes diverged between 700,000 to a million years ago, around the time the ancestors of Neanderthals split from other human ancestors. The centromere of chromosome 12 also contains an even more ancient, archaic haplotype that appears to be derived from an unknown relative.
    This Neanderthal DNA on chromosome 11 could be influencing differences in our sense of smell to this day. The cells that respond to taste and smell carry odorant receptors triggered by specific chemical signatures. Humans have about 400 different genes for odorant receptors. Thirty-four of these genes reside within the chromosome 11 centromere haplotype. The Neanderthal centromeric haplotypes and a second ancient haplotype account for about half of the variation in these odorant receptor proteins."


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    0 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    I did a video about this on my YouTube channel, apparently the DNA in the centromere does not Genetically recombine and is Neanderthal in origin, more evidence against the OOA theory?

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    The date of 500,000 years fits perfectly with Homo Heidelburgensis Evolving into Antecessor and then into Neanderthals 400,000 ybp, The OOA theory was debunked long ago with the Anatole Klosov Paper proving that Eurasians have no African Haplogroups and tha Eurasian Haplogroups separated 58,000 years ago The paper is called Re Examining the Out of Africa Theory and the Origins of Europoids, also Humans and Neanderthals share 99,7-99.9 of our DNA in common, See Also Yuan Et Al 2017 paper where he re organizes the Polygenic tree or both mtDNA haplogroups and YDNA haplogroups based on Homozygous alleles and Slow SNP's rather than Heterozygous alleles, Even |Africans don't originate in Africa and the large amount of Diversity seen in Africa is due to migration into Africa

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Fascinating stuff.

    See:
    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea...-dco061819.php

    "[FONT="]Langley and colleagues Sasha Langley and Gary Karpen at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Karen Miga at UC Santa Cruz reasoned that there could be haplotypes -- groups of genes that are inherited together in human evolution -- that stretch over vast portions of our genomes, and even across the centromere.[/FONT][FONT="]That's because the centromere does not participate in the "crossover" process that occurs when cells divide to form sperm or eggs. During crossover, paired chromosomes line up next to each other and their limbs cross, sometimes cutting and splicing DNA between them so that genes can be shuffled. But crossovers drop to zero near centromeres. Without that shuffling in every generation, centromeres might preserve very ancient stretches of DNA intact."

    "Turning to human DNA, the researchers looked at centromere sequences from the 1000 Genomes Project, a public catalog of human variation. They discovered haplotypes spanning the centromeres in all the human chromosomes.[/FONT]

    [FONT="]Haplotypes from half a million years ago[/FONT]
    [FONT="]In the X chromosome in these genome sequences, they found several major centromeric haplotypes representing lineages stretching back a half a million years. In the genome as a whole, most of the diversity is seen among African genomes consistent with the more recent spread of humans out of the African continent. One of the oldest centromere haplotype lineages was not carried by those early emigrants.[/FONT]
    [FONT="]In chromosome 11, they found highly diverged haplotypes of Neanderthal DNA in non-African genomes. These haplotypes diverged between 700,000 to a million years ago, around the time the ancestors of Neanderthals split from other human ancestors. The centromere of chromosome 12 also contains an even more ancient, archaic haplotype that appears to be derived from an unknown relative.[/FONT]
    This Neanderthal DNA on chromosome 11 could be influencing differences in our sense of smell to this day. The cells that respond to taste and smell carry odorant receptors triggered by specific chemical signatures. Humans have about 400 different genes for odorant receptors. Thirty-four of these genes reside within the chromosome 11 centromere haplotype. The Neanderthal centromeric haplotypes and a second ancient haplotype account for about half of the variation in these odorant receptor proteins."
    Yes, indeed, fascinating stuff!
    It is therefore worth while to search out the bounds between opinion and knowledge; and examine by what measures, in things whereof we have no certain knowledge, we ought to regulate our assent and moderate our persuasion. (John Locke)

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