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Thread: How can IE migration be explained without mentioning Seima Turbino?

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silesian View Post
    Yellow squares indicate shared IBD segments, no? If so then Khvalynsk ll and Ekanterinovka share with Yamnaya Ekanterinovka I0231 burial 2910-2875 BCE, and Yamnaya Derivka, Stredny Stog, no?
    Quote Originally Posted by Gaska View Post
    Anthony's NEW video talking about Yamnaya culture is especially pathetic. They have over 300 samples from the steppes, and they have decided that the Yamnaya culture is descended from Sredni Stog. However, they still don't know what the origin of chg-iran related ancestry is, and THEY STILL DON'T KNOW WHAT THE MALE UNIPARENTAL MARKERS OF SS CULTURE ARE (CURIOUSLY ALL THE NEW SAMPLES FROM THAT CULTURE ARE FEMALE- BAD LUCK???????)
    According to Anthony, they tried to connect SS to yamna. Moreover they did not find the origin of Yamna ydna and CHG. I think even EHG has nothing to do with Yamna.
    Modern indo-european scholars denied Gimbutas claim that SS culture with millet seeds originated from East, probably far east lake baikal. I think historical fact including migration could not be changed only in bronze age. I already posted evidence that yamna culture has sky-god ANE culture from altai and circle-sky/square-earth ANE culture from probably lake baikal.

    Quote Originally Posted by johen View Post
    Anthony thought R1a would be a commoner during yamna age, now Kristian claim the Maykob had early PIE.
    I think they had some PIE b/c they have CHG. Their impacts to yamna seems to be related with just materials. Yamna's main culture of sun and animal is closely related with west siberia, lake baikal by EHG.
    I want scholars to focus more upon east Ural to be connected to south-east aral sea from mesolithic to eneolithic.
    I think EHG R1a with mtdna c and pottery of lake baikal would meet CHG J over there to go their journey to Karelia.
    And yamna ancestor would pick up the CHG over there, where cattle and horse bones were buired. That is why I think sitashta culture popped up over there. Moreover mining at western siberia started from neolithic age.
    Quote Originally Posted by johen View Post
    ok, but I have some different opinion:
    Before flexed burial people like Khvalynsk, stredney stog, and yamna appeared in east europe, supine burial people dominated. However, I remembered that Ian M mentioned on 2018 that EHG was diluted by CHG and later farmer's genes in east europe. I think ancient burial type is their Origin Identity. Anatolia farmer did not change their burial type in europe.

    Moreover yamna has mtDNA C. Even if Russian scholar connected yamna C to EHG, the above IBD test shows that even Khvalynsk has no relationship with yamna. I just think a historical fact has not changed that every time different people entered east europe from steppe but with similar culture.
    https://www.eupedia.com/forum/thread...015#post621015

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by johen View Post
    According to Anthony, they tried to connect SS to yamna. Moreover they did not find the origin of Yamna ydna and CHG. I think even EHG has nothing to do with Yamna.
    Modern indo-european scholars denied Gimbutas claim that SS culture with millet seeds originated from East, probably far east lake baikal. I think historical fact including migration could not be changed only in bronze age. I already posted evidence that yamna culture has sky-god ANE culture from altai and circle-sky/square-earth ANE culture from probably lake baikal.




    https://www.eupedia.com/forum/thread...015#post621015
    https://amtdb.org/records/I5884 Ukraine_ 2890-2696 calBCE (4195±20 BP, PSUAMS-2828) R1b-CTS1078
    https://amtdb.org/records/I0443 R1b1a1a2a R1b-L23

  3. #53
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    ^ very tough, but it seems to me that they are compared to cimmerian and scythian or scythian and Hun (Attila was called to be " scythian lord). SS people was buried in supine & flexed position at flat grave, but yamna in the same position at mound. However the most important thing is SS people got millet sample originating in northern china. And then chinese neolithic culture seems to get cucuteni culture including yin-yang symbol:

    https://historum.com/proxy.php?image...d6debdf070b39c

    https://historum.com/proxy.php?image...4583008b9f8a46


    - see cucuteni type pottery and flexed position (west burial type )


    "Burial site reconstruction, Bianjiagou in Liaoning, Yangshao culture - Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, Stockholm"

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by johen View Post
    I think this sarmatian is a sky god. His daggers seems to originate in karasuk:

    Picture 2: Catacombs and tomb complex from Porogi


    and celtic god?
    One sample of early La Tène culture A from Putzenfeld am Dürrnberg, Hallein, Austria (ca 450–380 BC)
    Triskelion





    sarmatian roundel and scythian torc:




    One of the most intriguing questions researchers hope to answer is whether Celtic art had links into the wider Eurasian world. Until now, this material has mainly been analysed in terms of its European stylistic development, but the research team is now broadening its scope to look at the relationship between Celtic art and Iron Age art in the Eurasian steppe. They will be looking at a group of artefacts in excavations and museum collections that are traditionally described as ‘Celtic’ because of their use of spirals, circles, interlaced designs, or swirling representations of plants or animals.
    One main line of enquiry is the relationship between the central European Celts and their nomadic Eurasian neighbours (often referred to as Scythians or Sarmatians), who inhabited the European end of a grassland (steppe) corridor that stretched east towards Central Asia and China. Longstanding routes of communication across these semi-deserts and steppes, which later formed part of the Silk Road, are known to have played a significant role in earlier artistic and cultural exchanges between East and West.


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