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Thread: Pygmy adaptation to their environment

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    Pygmy adaptation to their environment

    See:
    https://www.gwern.net/docs/genetics/...2019-lopez.pdf

    Marie Lopez et al

    "Genomic Evidence for Local Adaptationof Hunter-Gatherers to the African Rainforest"

    "African rainforests support exceptionally high biodiversity and host the world’s largest number of activehunter-gatherers [1–3]. The genetic history of Africanrainforest hunter-gatherers and neighboring farmersis characterized by an ancient divergence more than100,000 years ago, together with recent populationcollapses and expansions, respectively [4–12]. Whilethe demographic past of rainforest hunter-gatherershas been deeply characterized, important aspects oftheir history of genetic adaptation remain unclear.Here, we investigated how these groups have adapted—through classic selective sweeps, polygenicadaptation, and selection since admixture—to thechallenging rainforest environments. To do so, weanalyzed a combined dataset of 566 high-coverageexomes, including 266 newly generated exomes,from 14 populations of rainforest hunter-gatherersand farmers, together with 40 newly generated,low-coverage genomes. We find evidence for astrong, shared selective sweep among all huntergatherer groups in the regulatory region ofTRPS1—primarily involved in morphological traits.We detect strong signals of polygenic adaptationfor height and life history traits such as reproductiveage; however, the latter appear to result from pervasive pleiotropy of height-associated genes. Furthermore, polygenic adaptation signals for functionsrelated to responses of mast cells to allergensand microbes, the IL-2 signaling pathway, andhost interactions with viruses support a history ofpathogen-driven selection in the rainforest. Finally, we find that genes involved in heart and bone development and immune responses are enriched in bothselection signals and local hunter-gatherer ancestryin admixed populations, suggesting that selectionhas maintained adaptive variation in the face ofrecent gene flow from farmers."


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    it would be interesting to check if the same happened to the SE Asian negrito's, who live in similar conditions and have the same morphology, but who are genetically totaly unrelated

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    0 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur View Post
    it would be interesting to check if the same happened to the SE Asian negrito's, who live in similar conditions and have the same morphology, but who are genetically totaly unrelated
    Good point. That didn't occur to me.

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