Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Classify this man. He belongs to an indigenous group in extinction.

  1. #1
    Regular Member Achievements:
    3 months registered10000 Experience PointsThree Friends
    Awards:
    Most Popular
    Duarte's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-01-19
    Location
    Belo Horizonte
    Posts
    714
    Points
    23,405
    Level
    46
    Points: 23,405, Level: 46
    Level completed: 86%, Points required for next Level: 145
    Overall activity: 72.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-DF27-FGC35133
    MtDNA haplogroup
    B2

    Ethnic group
    Brazilian
    Country: Brazil



    Classify this man. He belongs to an indigenous group in extinction.



    Tip: He is not from Americas or Western Eurasia. This picture was taken in 1910.

    “Às vezes ouço passar o vento; e só de ouvir o vento passar, vale a pena ter nascido”.
    Fernando Pessoa
    Y-DNA haplogroup: R1b > M269 > L23 > L51 > P310 > L151 > P312 > DF27 > ZZ12 > ZZ19 > Z31644 > BY2285 > BY25634 > FGC35133

  2. #2
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    15,852
    Points
    310,653
    Level
    100
    Points: 310,653, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 members found this post helpful.
    This is really a hard one, Duarte. I won't get it right, I'm sure.

    He looks a bit like the Ainu, but there were no Ainu around by 1910, were there?

    I guess I mean by that I see signs of Northeast Asian around the eyes, but the hair on both head and body and the nose are southeast Asian like? Almost Polynesian like?

    From what I remember of pictures of the Ainu they were dark, though, some of them looking almost Indian admixed.

    I don't know. Maybe somewhere just northeast of India? Some indigenous tribe there?


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  3. #3
    Regular Member Achievements:
    3 months registered10000 Experience PointsThree Friends
    Awards:
    Most Popular
    Duarte's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-01-19
    Location
    Belo Horizonte
    Posts
    714
    Points
    23,405
    Level
    46
    Points: 23,405, Level: 46
    Level completed: 86%, Points required for next Level: 145
    Overall activity: 72.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-DF27-FGC35133
    MtDNA haplogroup
    B2

    Ethnic group
    Brazilian
    Country: Brazil



    Classify this man. He belongs to an indigenous group in extinction.

    Deleted: duplicate text.

  4. #4
    Regular Member Achievements:
    3 months registered10000 Experience PointsThree Friends
    Awards:
    Most Popular
    Duarte's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-01-19
    Location
    Belo Horizonte
    Posts
    714
    Points
    23,405
    Level
    46
    Points: 23,405, Level: 46
    Level completed: 86%, Points required for next Level: 145
    Overall activity: 72.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-DF27-FGC35133
    MtDNA haplogroup
    B2

    Ethnic group
    Brazilian
    Country: Brazil



    Classify this man. He belongs to an indigenous group in extinction.

    Hi Angela.
    Thanks for participate.
    I will to compute your vote. Tonight or tomorrow morning I confirm his ethnicity ;)

    1) Angela: Ainu

  5. #5
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    15,852
    Points
    310,653
    Level
    100
    Points: 310,653, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Well, I think the Ainu are all gone, so maybe Northeast India?

    And you're welcome. :)

  6. #6
    Regular Member Achievements:
    3 months registered10000 Experience PointsThree Friends
    Awards:
    Most Popular
    Duarte's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-01-19
    Location
    Belo Horizonte
    Posts
    714
    Points
    23,405
    Level
    46
    Points: 23,405, Level: 46
    Level completed: 86%, Points required for next Level: 145
    Overall activity: 72.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-DF27-FGC35133
    MtDNA haplogroup
    B2

    Ethnic group
    Brazilian
    Country: Brazil



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    This is really a hard one, Duarte. I won't get it right, I'm sure.

    He looks a bit like the Ainu, but there were no Ainu around by 1910, were there?

    I guess I mean by that I see signs of Northeast Asian around the eyes, but the hair on both head and body and the nose are southeast Asian like? Almost Polynesian like?

    From what I remember of pictures of the Ainu they were dark, though, some of them looking almost Indian admixed.

    I don't know. Maybe somewhere just northeast of India? Some indigenous tribe there?
    Angela, you have a clinical eye for discovering ethnicities. Her first shot was absolutely accurate. The man from 1910’s picture is an Ainu. Congratulations my dear friend :)

    The Ainu or the Aynu are an indigenous people of Japan (Hokkaidō and formerly North-Eastern Honshū) and Russia (Sakhalin, the Kuril Islands, Khabarovsk Krai and the Kamchatka Peninsula).


    An Ainu man from Hokkaidō, c. 1910.

    Official estimates place the total Ainu population at 25,000, but unofficial estimates place its total population at 200,000, because many Ainu have been completely assimilated into Japanese society and as a result, they have no knowledge of their ancestry or omit it on purpose for fear of discrimination.

    "Full-blooded" Ainu, compared to people of Yamato descent (Japanese), often have lighter skin and more body hair. Many early investigators proposed a Caucasian ancestry. Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza places the Ainu in his "Northeast and East Asian" genetic cluster.

    Omoto has suggested that the Ainu are more closely related to other phenotypically East Asian people (i.e. people previously described using the now-deprecated term "Mongoloid"), than to phenotypically West Eurasian or Caucasoid (previously "Caucasian") people – on the basis of fingerprints and dental morphology.

    Anthropologist Joseph Powell (1999) of the University of New Mexico wrote "... we follow Brace and Hunt (1990) and Turner (1990) in viewing the Ainu as a southeast Asian population derived from early Jomon peoples of Japan, who have their closest biological affinity with South Asians rather than western Eurasian peoples". They also suggest morphological similarities to the Kennewick Man.

    Mark J. Hudson, Professor of Anthropology at Nishikyushu University, Kanzaki, Saga, Japan, has stated that Japan was settled by a "Proto-Mongoloid" population in the Pleistocene who became the Jōmon and that their features can be seen in the Ainu and Okinawan people. A dental morphology study shows the Jōmon and Ainu have their own dental structure, but are generally closer to the Sundadont groups which is more common in Southeast Asia and Taiwan (Turner, 1990).

    In 1893, anthropologist Arnold Henry Savage Landor described the Ainu as having deep-set eyes and an eye shape typical of Europeans, with a large and prominent browridge, large ears, hairy and prone to baldness, slightly hook nose with large and broad nostrils, prominent cheek-bones and a medium mouth.

    Ainu men have abundant wavy hair and often have long beards. The book of Ainu Life and Legends by author Kyōsuke Kindaichi (published by the Japanese Tourist Board in 1942) contains a physical description of Ainu:

    Many have wavy hair, but some straight black hair. Very few of them have wavy brownish hair. Their skins are generally reported to be light brown. But this is due to the fact that they labor on the sea and in briny winds all day. Old people who have long desisted from their outdoor work are often found to be as white as western men. The Ainu have broad faces, beetling eyebrows, and large sunken eyes, which are generally horizontal and of the so-called European type. Eyes of the Mongolian type are hardly found among them.

    Remains of the Jōmon people in Japan were found to belong to the Sundadon pattern, which is typically found in Southeast Asian peoples, such as Aboriginal Taiwanese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Indonesians, Thai, Borneans, Laosians, and Malays. A recreation of the map by William W. Howells, professor of anthropology at Harvard University, shows non-Mongol populations indicated by N (bold) and A (Wallacea, Melanesia and Australia australoides). The Sundadonte group comprises the peoples of Southeast Asia and other peoples of Japan (Ainu). The synodon group comprises populations from Korea, Japan, China, Mongolia and Siberia.



    Genetic tests show that Ainus belong mainly to haplogroup D-M55 (Y-DNA). Haplogroup D1b is found by the Japanese archipelago, with high frequencies in the Ainus and, to a lesser extent, in the Ryukyuan. The only places outside Japan where haplogroup D is common are Tibet in China and the Andaman Islands in the Indian Ocean, and are also important among Native American peoples.



    Sources: Portuguese and English Wikipedia.

  7. #7
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    15,852
    Points
    310,653
    Level
    100
    Points: 310,653, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Angela, you have a clinical eye for discovering ethnicities. Her first shot was absolutely accurate. The man from 1910’s picture is an Ainu. Congratulations my dear friend :)

    The Ainu or the Aynu are an indigenous people of Japan (Hokkaidō and formerly North-Eastern Honshū) and Russia (Sakhalin, the Kuril Islands, Khabarovsk Krai and the Kamchatka Peninsula).


    An Ainu man from Hokkaidō, c. 1910.

    Official estimates place the total Ainu population at 25,000, but unofficial estimates place its total population at 200,000, because many Ainu have been completely assimilated into Japanese society and as a result, they have no knowledge of their ancestry or omit it on purpose for fear of discrimination.

    "Full-blooded" Ainu, compared to people of Yamato descent (Japanese), often have lighter skin and more body hair. Many early investigators proposed a Caucasian ancestry. Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza places the Ainu in his "Northeast and East Asian" genetic cluster.

    Omoto has suggested that the Ainu are more closely related to other phenotypically East Asian people (i.e. people previously described using the now-deprecated term "Mongoloid"), than to phenotypically West Eurasian or Caucasoid (previously "Caucasian") people – on the basis of fingerprints and dental morphology.

    Anthropologist Joseph Powell (1999) of the University of New Mexico wrote "... we follow Brace and Hunt (1990) and Turner (1990) in viewing the Ainu as a southeast Asian population derived from early Jomon peoples of Japan, who have their closest biological affinity with South Asians rather than western Eurasian peoples". They also suggest morphological similarities to the Kennewick Man.

    Mark J. Hudson, Professor of Anthropology at Nishikyushu University, Kanzaki, Saga, Japan, has stated that Japan was settled by a "Proto-Mongoloid" population in the Pleistocene who became the Jōmon and that their features can be seen in the Ainu and Okinawan people. A dental morphology study shows the Jōmon and Ainu have their own dental structure, but are generally closer to the Sundadont groups which is more common in Southeast Asia and Taiwan (Turner, 1990).

    In 1893, anthropologist Arnold Henry Savage Landor described the Ainu as having deep-set eyes and an eye shape typical of Europeans, with a large and prominent browridge, large ears, hairy and prone to baldness, slightly hook nose with large and broad nostrils, prominent cheek-bones and a medium mouth.

    Ainu men have abundant wavy hair and often have long beards. The book of Ainu Life and Legends by author Kyōsuke Kindaichi (published by the Japanese Tourist Board in 1942) contains a physical description of Ainu:

    Many have wavy hair, but some straight black hair. Very few of them have wavy brownish hair. Their skins are generally reported to be light brown. But this is due to the fact that they labor on the sea and in briny winds all day. Old people who have long desisted from their outdoor work are often found to be as white as western men. The Ainu have broad faces, beetling eyebrows, and large sunken eyes, which are generally horizontal and of the so-called European type. Eyes of the Mongolian type are hardly found among them.

    Remains of the Jōmon people in Japan were found to belong to the Sundadon pattern, which is typically found in Southeast Asian peoples, such as Aboriginal Taiwanese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Indonesians, Thai, Borneans, Laosians, and Malays. A recreation of the map by William W. Howells, professor of anthropology at Harvard University, shows non-Mongol populations indicated by N (bold) and A (Wallacea, Melanesia and Australia australoides). The Sundadonte group comprises the peoples of Southeast Asia and other peoples of Japan (Ainu). The synodon group comprises populations from Korea, Japan, China, Mongolia and Siberia.



    Genetic tests show that Ainus belong mainly to haplogroup D-M55 (Y-DNA). Haplogroup D1b is found by the Japanese archipelago, with high frequencies in the Ainus and, to a lesser extent, in the Ryukyuan. The only places outside Japan where haplogroup D is common are Tibet in China and the Andaman Islands in the Indian Ocean, and are also important among Native American peoples.



    Sources: Portuguese and English Wikipedia.
    I don't know where I got the idea they were extinct by then. See, it's like teachers always tell you: go with your first answer. :)

    You're much too kind, as always.

    I just have a good memory for faces, or face types. That and enough useless facts floating around in my brain that I'm good at the Trivial Pursuit game. :)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •