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Thread: Can Spanish and Portuguese speakers understand Italian?

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    French Language - Can Italian, Spanish and Portuguese speakers understand?


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    2 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    French Language - Can Italian, Spanish and Portuguese speakers understand?

    Montre was a difficult one for me when I was learning French; it's nothing like the Spanish/Italian/Portuguese words.

    Interesting how the French are using a word from "to show", whereas the English are using a word from "to watch". :)


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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Yes, Angela, Very cute young people. There are very difficult phrases even for those who speak Portuguese, like this one, if spoken very quickly, LOL:

    ‘O rato roeu as roupas do Rei de Roma’.

    This means. ‘The rat gnawed on the clothes of the King of Rome’.

    There are many guttural Rs together. LOL.

    You are right. It is a lot of fun this game of tongue twister.

    Cheers :)
    I confess always thought this tongue-twister is in fact quite simple and easy if you pay enough attention... Now, this one is really tricky to speak correctly in a fast pace with all the "tr" and "pr" consonant clusters and so many "s":

    Três pratos de trigo pra três tigres tristes nos trilhos do trem.

    Three plates of wheat for three sad tigers on the rails of the train.

    This one is more funny than tricky, but I think the sequence of homophones and near homophones (changing only syllable stress or one or two vowels) is really interesting:

    O sabiá não sabia que o sábio sabia que o sabiá não sabe assobiar.

    The song thrush didn't know that the wise man knew that the song thrush doesn't know how to whistle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ygorcs View Post
    I confess always thought this tongue-twister is in fact quite simple and easy if you pay enough attention... Now, this one is really tricky to speak correctly in a fast pace with all the "tr" and "pr" consonant clusters and so many "s":

    Três pratos de trigo pra três tigres tristes nos trilhos do trem.

    Three plates of wheat for three sad tigers on the rails of the train.

    This one is more funny than tricky, but I think the sequence of homophones and near homophones (changing only syllable stress or one or two vowels) is really interesting:

    O sabiá não sabia que o sábio sabia que o sabiá não sabe assobiar.

    The song thrush didn't know that the wise man knew that the song thrush doesn't know how to whistle.
    Hi Ygorcs. Good Morning. This is really difficult. My tongue is stuck. Even speaking more slowly, I curl up. LOL. Very good these phrases.

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    Good morning, fellows!

    @Duarte
    I knew it as "o rato roeu a roupa do rei de Roma; a rainha Rosa raivosa roeu o resto". rs Ygorcs is right. It's easy.

    The one with "sabiá" is somewhat easy as well. You have just to repeat it few times.

    The most difficult is that one with "tigres tristes". All you have to do is repeating these two words few times, then you try the whole phrase again, and voilà.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    @Duarte
    I knew it as "o rato roeu a roupa do rei de Roma; a rainha Rosa raivosa roeu o resto". rs Ygorcs is right. It's easy.
    The one with "sabiá" is somewhat easy as well. You have just to repeat it few times.
    The most difficult is that one with "tigres tristes". All you have to do is repeating these two words few times, then you try the whole phrase again, and voilà.
    Good morning Regio. Thank you for completing the saying. I didn't remember the rest, LOL. Very cool :)

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Dear @Regio and @Ygorcs.
    It is almost an impossible mission to ask a 'Mineiro' like me that I pronounce all syllables, that I not suppress vowels, that I not agglutine the words, that I not use archaisms and that I not transform an entire sentence into a word of one kilometer of extension, as if we speak Finnish, and not Portuguese. LOL. I know that ‘Minas Gerais’ is not the best place for a foreign exchange student to perfect its standard Portuguese, learned in a language school. They arrive here and do not understand anything that we talk about in the colloquial use of the idiom. Most Brazilians from other states only understand us because outside of ‘Minas’, to communicate, we use standard Portuguese. This care does not exist among ourselves. Making a tongue twister game with a ‘Mineiro’ is an never ending wickedness, since we already have our tongue naturally twisted. LOL. In this quarantine, no 'Mineiro' is able to pronounce 'álcool em gel'. We was only able to pronounce 'alquingel'. LOL. Then, give me a discount in an attempt to reproduce the example sentences you both posted. For me it is terrible suffering. LOL.
    Cheers fellows. ;)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Dear @Regio and @Ygorcs.
    It is almost an impossible mission to ask a 'Mineiro' like me that I pronounce all syllables, that I not suppress vowels, that I not agglutine the words, that I not use archaisms and that I not transform an entire sentence into a word of one kilometer of extension, as if we speak Finnish, and not Portuguese. LOL. I know that ‘Minas Gerais’ is not the best place for a foreign exchange student to perfect its standard Portuguese, learned in a language school. They arrive here and do not understand anything that we talk about in the colloquial use of the idiom. Most Brazilians from other states only understand us because outside of ‘Minas’, to communicate, we use standard Portuguese. This care does not exist among ourselves. Making a tongue twister game with a ‘Mineiro’ is an never ending wickedness, since we already have our tongue naturally twisted. LOL. In this quarantine, no 'Mineiro' is able to pronounce 'álcool em gel'. We was only able to pronounce 'alquingel'. LOL. Then, give me a discount in an attempt to reproduce the example sentences you both posted. For me it is terrible suffering. LOL.
    Cheers fellows. ;)
    Lol I confirm this. I've been in Camanducaia-MG about six years ago, and a local cabby really impressed me with his huge accent. You probably have no accent compared to him. ah ah It looked like a dialect in "Nerso da Capitinga" fashion. No kidding. It was a surprise because I thought Nerso's existed only in TV, but no. Plus, that cabby treated me as an old fellow, and at the end, the trip (to Monte Verde) was almost for free. I was tempted to pay more than what he charged. They were all very receptive in that zone, and also in Caraça's, the two I visited (at different times).
    Generally speaking, I'd risk to say there is no people in Brazil more friendly and "simpático" than those in certain parts of Minas Gerais. :)

    I believe the accents in the South would be ok for foreigners. The pronunciations tend to be clear, with exceptions - one of them would be that from the "açorianos" in the coast of Santa Catarina, known as "manezinho".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Lol I confirm this. I've been in Camanducaia-MG about six years ago, and a local cabby really impressed me with his huge accent. You probably have no accent compared to him. ah ah It looked like a dialect in "Nerso da Capitinga" fashion. No kidding. It was a surprise because I thought Nerso's existed only in TV, but no. Plus, that cabby treated me as an old fellow, and at the end, the trip (to Monte Verde) was almost for free. I was tempted to pay more than what he charged. They were all very receptive in that zone, and also in Caraça's, the two I visited (at different times).
    Generally speaking, I'd risk to say there is no people in Brazil more friendly and "simpático" than those in certain parts of Minas Gerais. :)
    I believe the accents in the South would be ok for foreigners. The pronunciations tend to be clear, with exceptions - one of them would be that from the "açorianos" in the coast of Santa Catarina, known as "manezinho".
    LOL. I fully agree with you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Lol I confirm this. I've been in Camanducaia-MG about six years ago, and a local cabby really impressed me with his huge accent. You probably have no accent compared to him. ah ah It looked like a dialect in "Nerso da Capitinga" fashion. No kidding. It was a surprise because I thought Nerso's existed only in TV, but no. Plus, that cabby treated me as an old fellow, and at the end, the trip (to Monte Verde) was almost for free. I was tempted to pay more than what he charged. They were all very receptive in that zone, and also in Caraça's, the two I visited (at different times).
    Generally speaking, I'd risk to say there is no people in Brazil more friendly and "simpático" than those in certain parts of Minas Gerais. :)

    I believe the accents in the South would be ok for foreigners. The pronunciations tend to be clear, with exceptions - one of them would be that from the "açorianos" in the coast of Santa Catarina, known as "manezinho".
    Dear @ RégioX.

    It is not just the taxi driver from Camanducaia and Monte Verde who speaks the way you heard when you came to spend your vacation here in Minas Gerais. Everyone speaks, from the cleaner to a judge at the State Court of Justice. It's the dialect called 'mineirês' or 'montanhês'. For you laugh a lot, I post, next, a message from our Governor, Romeu Zema, talking about what a good public administration is. Remember that Zema is a very rich man and cannot be called ‘man of the people’ (as you can see, I don’t like him, LOL) but the way he talks will remind you, a lot, ‘Nerso da Capitinga’.



    Romeu Zema speaking: https://drive.google.com/file/d/11o2...w?usp=drivesdk

    I would like to make it clear that I do not speak like that, but when I am in the interior of the state, in order not to seem like an “unfriendly guy from the capital”, I do. I speak like this, for example, when I am in the city of my wife, Santa Margarida, in the ‘Zona da Mata’ of ​​the state of Minas Gerais, par excellence, the coffee region of the ‘Serra do Caparaó’, which also includes the mountain region of the state of Espírito Santo, both colonized by Italian immigrants.

    PS: Pay attention to the use of the verb ‘cagar’ (‘crap’) at the end of the speech, whose use is considered by my family members to be the extreme of vulgarity. He's our governor. LOL.

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    Mexican Spanish - Can Italian and Portuguese speakers understand it?



    Amazing for me. It’s so similar than I can talk with him with absolute naturally. Very cool. I love the Mexican pronunciation of Spanish. It was very funny to me be the translator of a Mexican couple that was hosted in the same hotel that I was hosted in London. The staff of front desk was Portuguese from Madeira Island and the nice couple, of who my wife and I became friends, can’t understand what they was speaking.

    In another situation, also in Europe, I made the crossing between Calais in France and Dover, England, by ferry. On that occasion, when arrived in Dover, I helped a pair of nice Argentine ladies who failed to understand the question asked by the immigration officer: “How long?” They looked at me begging for help and I told them that the officer was asking how long they would be in England. From then on I helped them make the currency exchange at the ATM. The Argentine ladies and the Mexican couple became our friends and we did all the tours together. Was very good.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Dear @ RégioX.

    It is not just the taxi driver from Camanducaia and Monte Verde who speaks the way you heard when you came to spend your vacation here in Minas Gerais. Everyone speaks, from the cleaner to a judge at the State Court of Justice. It's the dialect called 'mineirês' or 'montanhês'. For you laugh a lot, I post, next, a message from our Governor, Romeu Zema, talking about what a good public administration is. Remember that Zema is a very rich man and cannot be called ‘man of the people’ (as you can see, I don’t like him, LOL) but the way he talks will remind you, a lot, ‘Nerso da Capitinga’.



    Romeu Zema speaking: https://drive.google.com/file/d/11o2...w?usp=drivesdk

    I would like to make it clear that I do not speak like that, but when I am in the interior of the state, in order not to seem like an “unfriendly guy from the capital”, I do. I speak like this, for example, when I am in the city of my wife, Santa Margarida, in the ‘Zona da Mata’ of ​​the state of Minas Gerais, par excellence, the coffee region of the ‘Serra do Caparaó’, which also includes the mountain region of the state of Espírito Santo, both colonized by Italian immigrants.

    PS: Pay attention to the use of the verb ‘cagar’ (‘crap’) at the end of the speech, whose use is considered by my family members to be the extreme of vulgarity. He's our governor. LOL.
    Duarte, sorry, I didn't see it before.
    Lol Possibly a joke. Not sure he would say that.

    The voice does have a strong "mineiro" accent, but no, it's not like the accent of the "taxista" that took us to Monte Verde. No comparison. That one spoke sort of a dialect. lol

    My mother-in-law is like your wife ("Italian" from ES).

    Cheers

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Mexican Spanish - Can Italian and Portuguese speakers understand it?



    Amazing for me. It’s so similar than I can talk with him with absolute naturally. Very cool. I love the Mexican pronunciation of Spanish. It was very funny to me be the translator of a Mexican couple that was hosted in the same hotel that I was hosted in London. The staff of front desk was Portuguese from Madeira Island and the nice couple, of who my wife and I became friends, can’t understand what they was speaking.

    In another situation, also in Europe, I made the crossing between Calais in France and Dover, England, by ferry. On that occasion, when arrived in Dover, I helped a pair of nice Argentine ladies who failed to understand the question asked by the immigration officer: “How long?” They looked at me begging for help and I told them that the officer was asking how long they would be in England. From then on I helped them make the currency exchange at the ATM. The Argentine ladies and the Mexican couple became our friends and we did all the tours together. Was very good.
    It's difficult for me to know if as an Italian speaker I would understand the Mexican man, because I studied Spanish in school. I will say, though, that although I learned Castilian Spanish I find Mexican Spanish easier on the ear just in terms of sounds, more "melodious", but also easier to understand. I have more trouble with Puerto Rican or other Caribbean Spanish, A few of my distant relatives moved to Argentina, so I'm always interested in how they speak Spanish, and it seems to be there's an Italian "sound" and cadence to it.

    Coincidentally, this one from the same series came up, where the Mexican man and a man who is a French speaker from Montreal try to understand Catalan. I don't really know why, but just as it was when I spent a semester there decades ago, I find the Catalan extremely easy to understand. I thought it strange that the Spanish speaker was slower than I was, and the French speaker was hopeless. I think it may be that there are similarities to dialects spoken in Northwestern Italy, especially Liguria.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Duarte, sorry, I didn't see it before.
    Lol Possibly a joke. Not sure he would say that.

    The voice does have a strong "mineiro" accent, but no, it's not like the accent of the "taxista" that took us to Monte Verde. No comparison. That one spoke sort of a dialect. lol

    My mother-in-law is like your wife ("Italian" from ES).

    Cheers
    No problem, Regio.
    There is not a joke, lol, lol. It’s really our Governor Romeu Zema talking. lol lol. Here in BH there is a lot of joke when talking about him in any place. Some radio stations playing the horn, with soundtrack of country music before broadcasting any Zema’s speaks. But that speech is true, lol, lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    No problem, Regio.
    There is not a joke, lol, lol. It’s really our Governor Romeu Zema talking. lol lol. Here in BH there is a lot of joke when talking about him in any place. Some radio stations playing the horn, with soundtrack of country music before broadcasting any Zema’s speaks. But that speech is true, lol, lol.
    Veryl cool video Angela. I also cannot understand the Spanish spoken in the Caribbean and Venezuela. I understood 95% of what the girl from Catalunia said. But, as she said, she spokes slowly. As for swallowing syllables and vowels, this is what most is done in European Portuguese. The girl from Catalonia speaks Catalan with the accent of Castilian spoken in Castilla y León.

    As for the words pronounced in video, that is the translation in Portuguese:

    colher (spoon) in Portuguese;
    pernas (legs) in Portuguese;
    vela (candle) in Portuguese;
    aniversário (birthday) in Portuguese.
    pato (duck) in Portuguese;
    canário (canary) in Portuguese.

    Cheers.

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    Spanish vs Italian vs French vs Portuguese - Romance Languages Comparison.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    It's difficult for me to know if as an Italian speaker I would understand the Mexican man, because I studied Spanish in school. I will say, though, that although I learned Castilian Spanish I find Mexican Spanish easier on the ear just in terms of sounds, more "melodious", but also easier to understand. I have more trouble with Puerto Rican or other Caribbean Spanish, A few of my distant relatives moved to Argentina, so I'm always interested in how they speak Spanish, and it seems to be there's an Italian "sound" and cadence to it.

    Coincidentally, this one from the same series came up, where the Mexican man and a man who is a French speaker from Montreal try to understand Catalan. I don't really know why, but just as it was when I spent a semester there decades ago, I find the Catalan extremely easy to understand. I thought it strange that the Spanish speaker was slower than I was, and the French speaker was hopeless. I think it may be that there are similarities to dialects spoken in Northwestern Italy, especially Liguria.

    There are many Italians in Barcelona, and yes, it is very easy to communicate between Catalan and Italian. I assume the connection is Catalan-Occitan-Italian.

    French is also very easy for me, but only in reading (easier even than Italian). Pronunciation is what makes French difficult for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Farstar View Post
    There are many Italians in Barcelona, and yes, it is very easy to communicate between Catalan and Italian. I assume the connection is Catalan-Occitan-Italian.

    French is also very easy for me, but only in reading (easier even than Italian). Pronunciation is what makes French difficult for me.
    It's the same way for me with French. I found it extremely easy to learn to read it, but understanding spoken French, especially if it was spoken quickly, was much more difficult. I read somewhere that Italian shares more actual vocabulary with French than with any of the other Romance languages, so that may explain it for me.

    Speaking it myself wasn't difficult. I'm a bit of a mimic, and Ligurian has some sounds that are French sounding, so aping the sounds wasn't that hard.

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