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Thread: 7th century BC Piceni Elite Tomb

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    7th century BC Piceni Elite Tomb



    The media is calling him the Piceni Prince. It was excavated in the northern Marche region of Italy, and contains high status bronze items including weapons, as well as an iron wheeled chariot.

    Unfortunately the bones are long scattered.

    See:
    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...BA/core-reader

    "Excavation (Figure 3) focused on the central ring-ditch and, in particular, on a large and slightly off-centre pit, which contained an extraordinary collection of cultural material (Figure 4), including a bronze helmet, a variety of weapons, several bronze vessels and the remains of an iron-wheeled war chariot—unequivocal testament to the aristocratic status of the tomb's owner (Figures 5–6). The surrounding ditch, measuring 30m in diameter, marked out a funerary area that may originally have been covered by a mound."


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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    This is not a new find it dates from july 2018...what was found with this skeleton where daunian vases (illyrian ) from foggia.., chariot, etc......
    They are saying he is a south-picene, ie a umbri as opposed to a north-picene which are not umbri and completly different.....
    The skeleton from the first report says it cannot be tested due to damage while others are waithing for the 30 plus skeletons from Nis to see if there is any link

    https://exarc.net/issue-2013-2/at/pi...reconstruction

    There are a lot of hypothetical on this sample...see above

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    This is the official paper for a find mentioned in Archaeology News in 2018. You have some objection to my posting a link to it?

    https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...i-warrior.html

    This is what they had to say in 2018 about any possible remains.

    ""Unfortunately, the human remains were not preserved, possibly destroyed by late Roman or medieval ploughs", says Boschi, "but we found some fragments of bone in the pit with the grave goods which will be subjected to a DNA analysis to verify the sex of deceased.""

    This is what they say in the paper:

    "
    Still under debate, too, is the unknown position of the body within the royal tomb. Comparison with similar aristocratic interments farther to the south suggest differing possibilities, perhaps with the body placed at a higher level immediately above the grave goods, or within a shallow pit nearer the centre of the ring-ditch; the royal corredo (funerary assemblage) at Corinaldo did not occupy that central position or yield any skeletal material. In either case, it seems probable that the body was placed somewhere at or near the ancient ground surface. If so, it would have had little chance of surviving the centuries of subsequent ploughing that have removed all traces of any above ground mound."

    So, apparently no dna.

    As to the pottery:
    "
    Full analysis of the pottery and other finds promises new insights into the cultural, trading and gift-exchange relationships of the aristocracy in the area. Outstanding among the hundred or more ceramic vessels recovered was an olla—a large ceramic jar or pot—imported from ancient Daunia (modern northern Apulia in southern Italy."

    The article to which you linked has nothing to do with this. It dates from 2013 and is a reverie of a sort, a "mental reconstruction".

    Again, confusion inducing.

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    That is intriguing, thus interests me to read more about this.

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