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Thread: Very relevant results (75% Swiss, 25% Dutch) !

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    20-11-19
    Posts
    5

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b L21
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H46

    Ethnic group
    Germanic
    Country: Switzerland



    Very relevant results (75% Swiss, 25% Dutch) !

    Hello everyone, I am here to share with you my results from Living DNA which are very relevant.

    I am Swiss, descended in the vast majority from Bernese Anabaptists. As it is a fairly closed and close-knit community, it is very simple to go back a long way and establish a complete genealogy. I could define myself in the following way:
    - My paternal grandfather is the only one with French-speaking Swiss origins (only on his pure paternal lineage side). For everything else, he is descended from Bernese Anabaptists.
    - My paternal grandmother is primarily descended from Thurgovians (northeastern Switzerland), and to a lesser extent from Bernese Anabaptists.
    - My maternal grandfather is a pure Bernese Anabaptist.
    - My maternal grandmother is Dutch, mostly from Gelderland, Groningen, and Friesland.

    The autosomal results I was given are as follows:
    - 77.2% South Germanic
    - 20.7% Northwest Germanic
    - 2.1% England and Wales.

    Here we clearly notice the 22.8% coming from my Dutch grandmother (so 1/4 of my genetic heritage) and the remaining 3/4 coming from my father and not maternal grandfather. The fact that my Dutch grandmother has 2.2% South Germanic is explained by the fact that some of the lines I have identified come from Flanders (Belgium).

    The only big mystery is the origin of my haplogroup Y (L21), which is almost non-existent in Switzerland, since my paternal grandfather is probably descended from the indigenous inhabitants of the Jura who were successively "invaded" by the Anabaptists. The inhabitants of the region, before the Alpine Celts settled, would not all have left for the British Isles ...
    Then last thing, my mtDNA haplogroup is H46, on which I did not find any information. Anyone know anything about it?

    That's it, my presentation is over. Don't hesitate to let me know your results if you have Swiss origins!

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    13-11-19
    Posts
    44

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1B L21 - MC14
    MtDNA haplogroup
    W6A-sc5

    Ethnic group
    English, Irish, German, Swiss German
    Country: United States



    Alfred,
    I trace my Paternal GGG Grandfather Samuel Remund to Muleberg Switzerland just Northwest of Bern, this we can trace back in Switerland to 1530. My Y-DNA haplogroup on Big Y FamilyTreeDNA was also R1b L21 subclade DF13. All others after this were private mutations, so yes appears somewhat rare. My Guess for our Family,they came into the British Isles over 4000 years ago then left around 500AD during the Germanic invasions. They seemed to have settled in Brittany France,then as French Huguenots immigrated to Switzerland in the late 1400’s, this our best guess considering history and distance Echo’s of Family history.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    20-11-19
    Posts
    5

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b L21
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H46

    Ethnic group
    Germanic
    Country: Switzerland



    Thank you for your testimonial, it's exciting! Regarding your assumption, I think it's not consistent. First of all, French migrations took place at the end of the 17th century. And on top of that, Mhleberg is in German-speaking Switzerland, where the French did not go at all. And on top of that, Remund is a typically German-speaking Swiss surname, which acquired its status as a Mhleberg bourgeois before the 18th century.
    The best hypothesis in my opinion is that the haplogroup R1b-L21 is present in the Swiss Plateau and Jura with the culture of cord ceramics, before the Celts settled. A large part of them left for the British Isles, while a few stayed and mixed with the Celts and then with the Germans. So we come from a "rare" population.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    13-11-19
    Posts
    44

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1B L21 - MC14
    MtDNA haplogroup
    W6A-sc5

    Ethnic group
    English, Irish, German, Swiss German
    Country: United States



    Interesting,well you are from Switzerland and would know better than me. Our ancestor came over to America in 1855 ""So, we are from a rare population""do we share the same last name, Remund? If not, have you had the Big Y test on FamilyTree DNA done? Our Family results only went as far as R1B-L21 - subclade DF13 about 4,000 years ago, all others after were private mutations - I would think this rare considering the size of R1B in Western Europe. Regards

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    20-11-19
    Posts
    5

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b L21
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H46

    Ethnic group
    Germanic
    Country: Switzerland



    Quote Originally Posted by Dorquest View Post
    Interesting,well you are from Switzerland and would know better than me. Our ancestor came over to America in 1855 ""So, we are from a rare population""do we share the same last name, Remund? If not, have you had the Big Y test on FamilyTree DNA done? Our Family results only went as far as R1B-L21 - subclade DF13 about 4,000 years ago, all others after were private mutations - I would think this rare considering the size of R1B in Western Europe. Regards
    No, I did not do the FTDNA test, just Living DNA. My sublade is DF41/CTS2501.
    We don't share the same last name.

    You can find informations about your last name on this website https ://hls-dhs-dss.ch/famn/index.php

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