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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Szolad was in Noricum.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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    epirus
    .....................ie...ancient Albania

    http://www.asciatopo.altervista.org/epirus.html

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    ancient languages in italy .............I think it is only Roman times

    http://www.asciatopo.altervista.org/languages.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by torzio View Post
    Ancient Origins - Recently, an interesting archaeological site related to Etruscan culture in Corsica was discovered.



    27 APRIL, 2020 - 19:16
    ASHLEY COWIE

    Rare Etruscan Tomb of Treasures Excavated in Corsica


    Over the last few months as the world was slowly shutdown with the prevailing pandemic, a team of archaeological and anthropological researchers led by Franck Leandri, head curator of the French National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research ( Inrap), discovered a Roman and Etruscan necropolis including an exceptional 4th century BC Etruscan tomb, at Aléria, a commune in the Haute-Corse department of France on the east side of island of Corsica.
    Carved into solid bedrock, when the ancient tomb was excavated the archaeologists recovered a hoard of ceramic vessels resembling Etruscan pieces from Tuscany, and in a hypogeum located at the center of the tomb, ceremonial furniture was found to have collapsed over the remains of the woman who was laid to rest on her back. With her arms extended along the body and her head tilted slightly to the left, her remains contained a pair of gold earrings and two copper and gold alloy finger rings.

    Advanced Pre-Excavation Preservation Procedures

    With no written records, archaeologists only know the broad strokes about Etruscan culture : that they had originated in Tuscany during the Bronze Age around 900 BC and that after a gradual decline, the last Etruscan cities were absorbed by Rome around 100 BC. But now, according to an article in Archaeology.org, Leandri said the tomb will help his team of scholars “better understand the decline of Etruscan cities.”


    Among the more spectacular grave goods discovered in the tomb were two perfume vases, known formally as alabastrons, which were found lying on the feet of the buried woman. A collection of small black-varnished goblets, two damaged “ bronze mirrors ” and a dozen drinking goblets of different shapes and sizes were discovered aligned along the sides of the woman’s body.
    But before even a grain of dust was removed from the site, after the initial discovery this exceptionally-well preserved tomb, a Bible of equally exceptional preservation measures were designed for digging out the fragile ceramics.



    Scared Grave Goods At The Elite Etruscan Tomb


    The team of scientists afforded great attention to studying the sedimentary layers trapped within the ancient vases as they were removed from the tomb. In total, 22 ancient ceramics were analyzed through non-intrusive CT scanning and 3Dimages were generated revealing microscopic data pertaining to the material composition of the dense concentrations of sediment. And after the preservation project had excavated and assembled the collection of artifacts, the ‘post-excavation’ phase of the research began requiring every artifact to be cleaned, stabilized and catalogued.

    The first results of the CT analyses revealed some unpredicted outcomes that “surprised” the archaeologists, including an alabaster containing a metal rod which is thought to have been a perfume or ointment stick. A large skyphos (two-handled deep wine-cup) was found containing a small cup, and a smaller skyphos contained a “difficult to identify object.” What’s more, one of the cups situated near the feet of the woman’s body contained a small bronze ring, one of five discovered in this tomb, and another had been placed inside a fabric or basketry container that rotted away many centuries ago.




    Tomb Of An Ancient Goddess?

    A report on Reuters says the discovery of this tomb will illustrate how ancient populations in Corsica flourished and they will also tell archaeologists about the slow demise of the Etruscan civilization and how exactly their End of Days unfolded. Head curator Franck Leandri says the tomb, and its treasures, are “the missing link” which will not only allow the piecing together of scattered Etruscan funerary rites but reinforces the popular hypothesis that before the Romanconquest of 259 BC, Aleria was a major “transit point in the Tyrrhenian Sea, blending Etruscan, Carthaginian and Phocaean interests”.

    Anthropologist Catherine Rigeade told Reuters that in conclusion, the ancient tomb appears to have belonged to a high-ranking official female who was surrounded with about 15 ceramic vases including what appears be two rare bronze mirrors. And the next phase of this fascinating research project will now focus on these two exceptional, yet heavily damaged, bronze mirrors , along with a fine bone handle which the researchers think might both be related to some kind of ritualist bathing, or sacred environment relating to a goddess, lost in the fires of the expanding Roman empire .

    Top image: View of the Etruscan burial chamber. In the foreground bowls and animal remains and towards the back the deceased. Source: Roland Haurillon, Inrap
    By Ashley Cowie

    https://www.ancient-origins.net/news...n-tomb-0013628


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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Ancient Origins - Recently, an interesting archaeological site related to Etruscan culture in Corsica was discovered.



    27 APRIL, 2020 - 19:16
    ASHLEY COWIE

    Rare Etruscan Tomb of Treasures Excavated in Corsica


    Over the last few months as the world was slowly shutdown with the prevailing pandemic, a team of archaeological and anthropological researchers led by Franck Leandri, head curator of the French National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research ( Inrap), discovered a Roman and Etruscan necropolis including an exceptional 4th century BC Etruscan tomb, at Aléria, a commune in the Haute-Corse department of France on the east side of island of Corsica.
    Carved into solid bedrock, when the ancient tomb was excavated the archaeologists recovered a hoard of ceramic vessels resembling Etruscan pieces from Tuscany, and in a hypogeum located at the center of the tomb, ceremonial furniture was found to have collapsed over the remains of the woman who was laid to rest on her back. With her arms extended along the body and her head tilted slightly to the left, her remains contained a pair of gold earrings and two copper and gold alloy finger rings.

    Advanced Pre-Excavation Preservation Procedures

    With no written records, archaeologists only know the broad strokes about Etruscan culture : that they had originated in Tuscany during the Bronze Age around 900 BC and that after a gradual decline, the last Etruscan cities were absorbed by Rome around 100 BC. But now, according to an article in Archaeology.org, Leandri said the tomb will help his team of scholars “better understand the decline of Etruscan cities.”


    Among the more spectacular grave goods discovered in the tomb were two perfume vases, known formally as alabastrons, which were found lying on the feet of the buried woman. A collection of small black-varnished goblets, two damaged “ bronze mirrors ” and a dozen drinking goblets of different shapes and sizes were discovered aligned along the sides of the woman’s body.
    But before even a grain of dust was removed from the site, after the initial discovery this exceptionally-well preserved tomb, a Bible of equally exceptional preservation measures were designed for digging out the fragile ceramics.



    Scared Grave Goods At The Elite Etruscan Tomb


    The team of scientists afforded great attention to studying the sedimentary layers trapped within the ancient vases as they were removed from the tomb. In total, 22 ancient ceramics were analyzed through non-intrusive CT scanning and 3Dimages were generated revealing microscopic data pertaining to the material composition of the dense concentrations of sediment. And after the preservation project had excavated and assembled the collection of artifacts, the ‘post-excavation’ phase of the research began requiring every artifact to be cleaned, stabilized and catalogued.

    The first results of the CT analyses revealed some unpredicted outcomes that “surprised” the archaeologists, including an alabaster containing a metal rod which is thought to have been a perfume or ointment stick. A large skyphos (two-handled deep wine-cup) was found containing a small cup, and a smaller skyphos contained a “difficult to identify object.” What’s more, one of the cups situated near the feet of the woman’s body contained a small bronze ring, one of five discovered in this tomb, and another had been placed inside a fabric or basketry container that rotted away many centuries ago.




    Tomb Of An Ancient Goddess?

    A report on Reuters says the discovery of this tomb will illustrate how ancient populations in Corsica flourished and they will also tell archaeologists about the slow demise of the Etruscan civilization and how exactly their End of Days unfolded. Head curator Franck Leandri says the tomb, and its treasures, are “the missing link” which will not only allow the piecing together of scattered Etruscan funerary rites but reinforces the popular hypothesis that before the Romanconquest of 259 BC, Aleria was a major “transit point in the Tyrrhenian Sea, blending Etruscan, Carthaginian and Phocaean interests”.

    Anthropologist Catherine Rigeade told Reuters that in conclusion, the ancient tomb appears to have belonged to a high-ranking official female who was surrounded with about 15 ceramic vases including what appears be two rare bronze mirrors. And the next phase of this fascinating research project will now focus on these two exceptional, yet heavily damaged, bronze mirrors , along with a fine bone handle which the researchers think might both be related to some kind of ritualist bathing, or sacred environment relating to a goddess, lost in the fires of the expanding Roman empire .

    Top image: View of the Etruscan burial chamber. In the foreground bowls and animal remains and towards the back the deceased. Source: Roland Haurillon, Inrap
    By Ashley Cowie

    https://www.ancient-origins.net/news...n-tomb-0013628

    Great find, Duarte. :)

    Well, that was certainly a culture where women were apparently buried with dignity and respect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Great find, Duarte. :)

    Well, that was certainly a culture where women were apparently buried with dignity and respect.
    Yes, Angela, you are right.
    This particular burial reveals a great respect for the buried woman. It demonstrates the importance of the female figure in this very advanced culture. It is a rare finding considering that, before Romanization, the predominant funeral practice among the Etruscans was cremation.
    Cheers :)

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    4 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Yes, Angela, you are right.
    This particular burial reveals a great respect for the buried woman. It demonstrates the importance of the female figure in this very advanced culture. It is a rare finding considering that, before Romanization, the predominant funeral practice among the Etruscans was cremation.
    Cheers :)
    Romantic that I am, these Etruscan tombs are my favorites:




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    3 members found this post helpful.
    Dec 21, 2020

    Discovery of 66 new Roman Army sites shows more clues about one of the empire's most infamous conflicts


    by University of Exeter




    Roman military presence in Castile. Credit: romanarmy.eu
    The discovery of dozens of new Roman Army sites thanks to remote sensing technology has revealed more about one of the empire's most infamous conflicts.
    Analysis of the 66 camps shows the Roman army had a larger presence in the region than previously thought during the 200-year battle to conquer the Iberian Peninsula.

    The discovery of camps of different sizes—used for training and shelter—has allowed experts to map how soldiers attacked indigenous groups from different directions and to learn more about the footprint of the Roman military presence in the northern fringe of the River Duero basin—the León, Palencia, Burgos and Cantabria provinces.

    Experts analyzed aerial photography and satellite images, created three-dimensional models of the terrain from LiDAR data and used drones to create detailed maps of the sites. This included resources from the Spanish National Geographic Institute (IGN) and geoportals such as Google Earth or Bing Maps. Pinpointing locations allowed fieldwork to then take place.

    These temporary occupations usually left fragile and subtle traces on the surface. The ditches or the earth and stone ramparts protecting these fortifications have been filled in and flattened. Combining different remote sensing images and fieldwork shows the perimeter shape of the temporary Roman military camps, often a rectangle like a playing card.

    Roman military presence in Leon. Credit: romanarmy.eu
    These new sites are located at the foothills of the Cantabrian Mountains, where the conflict between Romans and natives was focused at the end of the 1st century BC. This suggests soldiers crossed between lowlands and uplands, using ridges in the mountains to stay out of site and give themselves more protection.
    The fact there were so many army camps in the region shows the immense logistical support which allowed soldiers to conquer the area. Sites were used to aid movement to remote locations and to help soldiers stay in the area over the cold winter months. Some of the camps may have housed soldiers for weeks or months, and overs overnight.
    The aim of the occupation was to expand the empire and to be able to exploit natural resources such as tin and gold.


    https://phys.org/news/2020-12-discov...tes-clues.html
    The research, published in the journal Geosciences, was carried out by Andrés Menéndez Blanco, Jesús García Sánchez from the Archaeology Institute of Mérida, José Manuel Costa-García and Víctor Vicente García from the University of Santiago de Compostela, João Fonte from the University of Exeter and David González-Álvarez from the Institute of Heritage Sciences, Spanish National Research Council.
    Dr. Fonte said: "We have identified so many sites because we used different types of remote sensing. Airborne laser scanning gave good results for some sites in more remote places because it showed earthworks really well. Aerial photography worked better in lowland areas for the detection of cropmarks."

    Aerial photographs of the camp of Tortolondro (black) (A), the Roman road (white) and the camp (black) at Quintanilla de Riofresno. Credit: romanarmy.eu
    "The remains are of the temporary camps that the Roman army set up when moving through hostile territory or when carrying out manoeuveres around their permanent bases. They reveal the intense Roman activity at the entrance to the Cantabrian Mountains during the last phase of the Roman conquest of Hispania."
    There is an important concentration of 25 sites along the valleys of northern Palencia and Burgos, as well as southern Cantabria. In the province of León, as many as 41 sites have been documented in different valleys. These range from small forts of a few hundred square meters to large fortified enclosures of 15 hectares.
    Most of these Roman military sites were located in close proximity of later important Roman towns. Sasamón, a village in Burgos that was probably where nearby the Emperor Augusto established his camp during his presence in the front.
    The research will continue so experts can examine the relationships the Romans established with indigenous communities, named Vaccaei, Turmogi, Cantabri, Astures and Callaeci, according to the Greek and Latin sources.
    The team is currently developing a project to catalog and document all the Roman camps in the province of León by means of drones, in order to gain a better understanding of their structures or the evolution of their state of conservation. Work is also continuing in Burgos and in Sasamón, including a study of the Cerro de Castarreño settlement and its conquest in the 1st century BC.

    https://phys.org/news/2020-12-discov...tes-clues.html

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    Antonio Sciarretta is an amateur scholar who supports unreliable theories. To be precise he is an engineer and it would be better if he had chosen another hobby.


    Torzio, it would be time for you to start reading some books and not just read what you find on the web.

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