Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: The evolutionary history of extinct and living lions

  1. #1
    Regular Member Regio X's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-03-14
    Posts
    1,059


    Country: Italy



    1 members found this post helpful.

    The evolutionary history of extinct and living lions

    The evolutionary history of extinct and living lions

    Abstract
    Lions are one of the world’s most iconic megafauna, yet little is known about their temporal and spatial demographic history and population differentiation. We analyzed a genomic dataset of 20 specimens: two ca. 30,000-y-old cave lions (Panthera leo spelaea), 12 historic lions (Panthera leo leo/Panthera leo melanochaita) that lived between the 15th and 20th centuries outside the current geographic distribution of lions, and 6 present-day lions from Africa and India. We found that cave and modern lions shared an ancestor ca. 500,000 y ago and that the 2 lineages likely did not hybridize following their divergence. Within modern lions, we found 2 main lineages that diverged ca. 70,000 y ago, with clear evidence of subsequent gene flow. Our data also reveal a nearly complete absence of genetic diversity within Indian lions, probably due to well-documented extremely low effective population sizes in the recent past. Our results contribute toward the understanding of the evolutionary history of lions and complement conservation efforts to protect the diversity of this vulnerable species.

    https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/04/28/1919423117




  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    02-10-21
    Posts
    43


    Country: USA - Texas



    1 members found this post helpful.
    africa is gone.

  3. #3
    Regular Member Nicu's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-10-21
    Posts
    28

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-L23

    Ethnic group
    Romanian/Greek
    Country: USA - Texas



    Cool. It's kind of too bad that Europe lost its once native lion population many thousands of years ago. The Lowenmensch figurine was a paleolithic carving of a lion man from 30k years ago in Germany, which is interesting. That's in addition to actual saber-toothed tigers that lived in caves as well.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    03-10-21
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    20


    Ethnic group
    Usa
    Country: United States



    I think not only lions left Africa, there were still many aligators at least, possibly kangaroos and other exotic animals!

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    19-03-18
    Location
    Wellington
    Age
    67
    Posts
    117

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-L21 DF5>BY154246
    MtDNA haplogroup
    J1c3b2

    Ethnic group
    Maori Irish French Scottish English
    Country: New Zealand



    Quote Originally Posted by bnuizqueb View Post
    I think not only lions left Africa, there were still many aligators at least, possibly kangaroos and other exotic animals!
    Kangaroos? Maybe that's how humans discovered Australia 50,000 years ago, they simply followed the kangaroos from Africa.

  6. #6
    Regular Member Nicu's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-10-21
    Posts
    28

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-L23

    Ethnic group
    Romanian/Greek
    Country: USA - Texas



    Quote Originally Posted by Tamakore View Post
    Kangaroos? Maybe that's how humans discovered Australia 50,000 years ago, they simply followed the kangaroos from Africa.
    Most of the native animals to Australia were actually marsupials before the arrival of Westerners, who introduced other kinds.

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    19-03-18
    Location
    Wellington
    Age
    67
    Posts
    117

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-L21 DF5>BY154246
    MtDNA haplogroup
    J1c3b2

    Ethnic group
    Maori Irish French Scottish English
    Country: New Zealand



    Quote Originally Posted by Nicu View Post
    Most of the native animals to Australia were actually marsupials before the arrival of Westerners, who introduced other kinds.
    Yes, I've since learned that my speculation was incorrect. Marsupials originated in North America, spread to South America and reached Australia via Antarctica before the complete break up of Gondwana. There never were any kangaroos in Africa (except lately perhaps in zoos).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •