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Thread: What is the difference between the SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 alleles?

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    What is the difference between the SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 alleles?

    What is the difference between the SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 alleles? I know that both are alleles of depigmentation and are distributed throughout Europe, but is one of them dominant over the other? If the same individual has both alleles, is any of them dominant or do they work together? Thank you.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ack View Post
    What is the difference between the SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 alleles? I know that both are alleles of depigmentation and are distributed throughout Europe, but is one of them dominant over the other? If the same individual has both alleles, is any of them dominant or do they work together? Thank you.
    They work together, and apparently the SLC24A5 is "stronger" than SLC45A2. At least the former has a higher magnitude in SNPedia.
    SLC24A5: https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1426654
    SLC45A2: https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs16891982

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    My skin traits on yourDNAportal:






    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post

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    According to Mathieson in his latest paper on pigmentation, SLC45A2 is not a major factor in pigmentation. That's the first such statement of which I'm aware.

    See the link to the paper and discussion including charts at...
    https://www.eupedia.com/forum/thread...t=pigmentation


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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    According to Mathieson in his latest paper on pigmentation, SLC45A2 is not a major factor in pigmentation. That's the first such statement of which I'm aware.
    See the link to the paper and discussion including charts at...
    https://www.eupedia.com/forum/thread...t=pigmentation
    That possibly explains why its magnitude is low in SNPedia.
    My wife is homozygous GG for SLC45A2, however, she's heterozygous for SLC24A5, curiously. She inherited one G allele from her Brazilian father (Portuguese + NA + traces of SSA). I know it because her mother is AA. It made her (beautiful) skin kind of golden, or light brown, even without sun exposure. I thought it'd be good if our son inherited this allele, je je, given the possibility he'll spend most part of his life in a tropical place. If he lives instead in a high latitude place, either he'd take more sun or supplement with D3. Unfortunately, he actually inherited the A from her.

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    Years ago, before you were active here certain posters found it highly unusual that I have these traits; they also seemed to feel I should consider it an honor. Such silliness. It's the most important physical trait I have which I would have changed if I could; I've spent my life hiding from the sun, especially when on vacation, i.e. Florida, the Caribbean, but even at home on the Mediterranean in the summer or here in the Hamptons. I'm either under an umbrella or an overhang, or wandering around looking like someone going to a Halloween Party as Scarlett O'Hara or as Isadora Duncan in her veils, and we know how that turned out. :)


    Marker: rs1426654

    SLC24A5 rs1426654 48426484 A or G A / A
    SLC45A2 rs16891982 33951693 C or G G / G
    This is CTSG. "G" is the "European" variant.
    rs3758833 88071656 A or G G / G

    This is the TYRP1 snp he targets.
    intergenic rs1325132 12525999 A or G G / G

    BNC2 rs2153271 16864521 C or T T / T

    rs4778123, the OCA2 variant he found important, doesn’t seem to be covered in my version of 23andme.


    It must be how all of the alleles work in combination with each other which produce certain results. The small effect genes would come in as well, although not as important as these.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Years ago, before you were active here certain posters found it highly unusual that I have these traits; they also seemed to feel I should consider it an honor. Such silliness. It's the most important physical trait I have which I would have changed if I could; I've spent my life hiding from the sun, especially when on vacation, i.e. Florida, the Caribbean, but even at home on the Mediterranean in the summer or here in the Hamptons. I'm either under an umbrella or an overhang, or wandering around looking like someone going to a Halloween Party as Scarlett O'Hara or as Isadora Duncan in her veils, and we know how that turned out. :)


    Marker: rs1426654

    SLC24A5 rs1426654 48426484 A or G A / A
    SLC45A2 rs16891982 33951693 C or G G / G
    This is CTSG. "G" is the "European" variant.
    rs3758833 88071656 A or G G / G

    This is the TYRP1 snp he targets.
    intergenic rs1325132 12525999 A or G G / G

    BNC2 rs2153271 16864521 C or T T / T

    rs4778123, the OCA2 variant he found important, doesn’t seem to be covered in my version of 23andme.


    It must be how all of the alleles work in combination with each other which produce certain results. The small effect genes would come in as well, although not as important as these.
    Thanks. Very interesting. These SNPs should be included in SNPedia.
    Yes, some other less important SNPs may play a role, such those that affect also hair, eyes...

    SLC24A5 (rs1426654) - Mine AA; Father AA; Mother AA; Wife AG; Son AA; Mother-in-law AA.
    SLC45A2 (rs16891982) - All GG.
    rs3758833 - Mine AG; Father GG; Mother AG; Wife GG; Son GG; Mother-in-law GG.
    rs1325132 - All GG.
    rs2153271 - Mine CT; Father CC; Mother TT; Wife CT; Son ?; Mother-in-law TT.
    rs4778123 - No results.

    "
    ED: Forgot the following (as per the Figure below)

    SLC24A5 (rs2675345) - No results.
    rs12203592 - Mine CC (common on affy axiom data); Father CT (Primarily in Europeans; likely presence of freckles, brown hair and high sensitivity of skin to sun exposure.); Mother CC; Wife CC; Son CC (inferred); Mother-in-law CC.
    "

    Chart.jpg



    As for spending your life hiding from the sun, I perfectly know what you mean. And you live at latitude ~41. Now, imagine if you had to live in the tropics. ;) My father and siblings never cared at all about physical traits, but my mother always said she would like to have been blessed with a darker skin. :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Years ago, before you were active here certain posters found it highly unusual that I have these traits; they also seemed to feel I should consider it an honor. Such silliness. It's the most important physical trait I have which I would have changed if I could; I've spent my life hiding from the sun, especially when on vacation, i.e. Florida, the Caribbean, but even at home on the Mediterranean in the summer or here in the Hamptons. I'm either under an umbrella or an overhang, or wandering around looking like someone going to a Halloween Party as Scarlett O'Hara or as Isadora Duncan in her veils, and we know how that turned out. :)


    Marker: rs1426654

    SLC24A5 rs1426654 48426484 A or G A / A
    SLC45A2 rs16891982 33951693 C or G G / G
    This is CTSG. "G" is the "European" variant.
    rs3758833 88071656 A or G G / G

    This is the TYRP1 snp he targets.
    intergenic rs1325132 12525999 A or G G / G

    BNC2 rs2153271 16864521 C or T T / T

    rs4778123, the OCA2 variant he found important, doesn’t seem to be covered in my version of 23andme.


    It must be how all of the alleles work in combination with each other which produce certain results. The small effect genes would come in as well, although not as important as these.
    I don't think it's unusual because the variation seems to be fixed across Europe.

    Gene fixado.jpg

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    [QUOTE = Angela; 603693] Segundo Mathieson em seu último artigo sobre pigmentação, o SLC45A2 não é um fator importante na pigmentação. Essa é a primeira declaração desse tipo da qual estou ciente.

    Veja o link para o artigo e a discussão, incluindo gráficos em ...
    https://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/39992-The-evolution-of-skin-pigmentation-associated-variation-in-West-Eurasia? destaque = pigmentação [/ QUOTE]


    ​Interesting, thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Thanks. Very interesting. These SNPs should be included in SNPedia.
    Yes, some other less important SNPs may play a role, such those that affect also hair, eyes...
    SLC24A5 (rs1426654) - Mine AA; Father AA; Mother AA; Wife AG; Son AA; Mother-in-law AA.
    SLC45A2 (rs16891982) - All GG.
    rs3758833 - Mine AG; Father GG; Mother AG; Wife GG; Son GG; Mother-in-law GG.
    rs1325132 - All GG.
    rs2153271 - Mine CT; Father CC; Mother TT; Wife CT; Son ?; Mother-in-law TT.
    rs4778123 - No results.
    "
    ED: Forgot the following (as per the Figure below)
    SLC24A5 (rs2675345) - No results.
    rs12203592 - Mine CC (common on affy axiom data); Father CT (Primarily in Europeans; likely presence of freckles, brown hair and high sensitivity of skin to sun exposure.); Mother CC; Wife CC; Son CC (inferred); Mother-in-law CC.
    "
    Chart.jpg
    As for spending your life hiding from the sun, I perfectly know what you mean. And you live at latitude ~41. Now, imagine if you had to live in the tropics. ;) My father and siblings never cared at all about physical traits, but my mother always said she would like to have been blessed with a darker skin. :)
    Este gráfico/imagem é de qual artigo?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ack View Post
    I don't think it's unusual because the variation seems to be fixed across Europe.
    Gene fixado.jpg
    Some results are virtually fixed, yes, such for example the one for SLC24A5 rs1426654, but as you know there're other SNPs that affect pigmentation, and certain results may vary even within Europe.

    https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1426654

    Quote Originally Posted by Ack View Post
    Este gráfico/imagem é de qual artigo?
    Check it here:
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2020/05/09/2020.05.08.085274/DC1/embed/media-1.pdf

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Years ago, before you were active here certain posters found it highly unusual that I have these traits; they also seemed to feel I should consider it an honor. Such silliness. It's the most important physical trait I have which I would have changed if I could; I've spent my life hiding from the sun, especially when on vacation, i.e. Florida, the Caribbean, but even at home on the Mediterranean in the summer or here in the Hamptons. I'm either under an umbrella or an overhang, or wandering around looking like someone going to a Halloween Party as Scarlett O'Hara or as Isadora Duncan in her veils, and we know how that turned out. :)


    Marker: rs1426654

    SLC24A5 rs1426654 48426484 A or G A / A
    SLC45A2 rs16891982 33951693 C or G G / G
    This is CTSG. "G" is the "European" variant.
    rs3758833 88071656 A or G G / G

    This is the TYRP1 snp he targets.
    intergenic rs1325132 12525999 A or G G / G

    BNC2 rs2153271 16864521 C or T T / T

    rs4778123, the OCA2 variant he found important, doesn’t seem to be covered in my version of 23andme.


    It must be how all of the alleles work in combination with each other which produce certain results. The small effect genes would come in as well, although not as important as these.
    My markers:




    The other markers are "no call" for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    Some results are virtually fixed, yes, such for example the one for SLC24A5 rs1426654, but as you know there're other SNPs that affect pigmentation, and certain results may vary even within Europe.
    https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1426654
    Check it here:
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/bior...ed/media-1.pdf
    Thank you for the link. Yes, there is certainly variation in Europe, but it seems to be something complex. I just tried to say that the allele mentioned is extremely common across Europe.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    My markers:




    The other markers are "no call" for me.
    It looks a lot like mine. I'm also AA for rs1426654 and CG for rs16891982

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ack View Post
    I don't think it's unusual because the variation seems to be fixed across Europe.

    Gene fixado.jpg
    I mentioned there was surprise that I, as an Italian, was completely derived for both SLC24A5 and SLC45A2.

    Until the publication of this paper just recently every paper I ever saw on pigmentation considered SLC45A2 one of the major de-pigmentation snps in Europe, and although levels are high in Europe, it's by no means fixed.

    As per the thread to which I linked...







    The following is 42A5, which everyone has considered important until now.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    As for spending your life hiding from the sun, I perfectly know what you mean. And you live at latitude ~41. Now, imagine if you had to live in the tropics. ;) My father and siblings never cared at all about physical traits, but my mother always said she would like to have been blessed with a darker skin. :)
    I don't think I could survive in the tropics.

    As I've mentioned, my parents and then I had a condo in Florida, which is pretty tropical, for decades. I spent a week there in May one year, which is technically still spring, and lived to regret it. I was slathered in the strongest sun screen I could find, and wore a hat, but somehow just the reflected sunlight "burned" my eyes. The itching and watering were unbearable but when I went to the doctor thinking it was some new allergy he explained it and said I had to wear wrap around sunglasses when I went outdoors. Mine were too small and let in too much light.

    In Mexico, at a hotel called Las Brisas, they provided you with little open sided jeeps with a cover. I thought for once I didn't need all that greasy cream. Well, the problem was I held onto the post for curves. That night my arm swelled up like a sausage. Doctors again.

    The worst was in Cape May, New Jersey soon after I married. Like an idiot I wanted to get a little color on my face so I didn't put sun screen on it. I fell asleep for two hours or so on the beach with one cheek exposed. In the middle of the night, feeling an incredible tightness in my face I went to the bathroom and screamed and cried in absolute terror. My entire face was swollen like a monster's, eyes squeezed shut, and a brilliant red. The emergency room doctors had to give me shots of steroids and steroid cream and I spent the rest of the vacation in the darkened hotel room. After he treated me, the doctor proceeded to yell at me and tell me that if I didn't want to die young of melanoma I'd stay out of the sun.

    So, my wish for one ancestral allele somewhere didn't stem from aesthetic considerations at all; I quite liked the color of my skin against my dark hair. :) It was a question of it being a burden in a lot of situations.

    The tropics are also not for me, unless they spray the hell out of it, because I'm a magnet for mosquitoes, sand fleas, you name it. Like an idiot, again, I wanted a "green" vacation, no nasty chemical spraying, yada, yada, yada, so once we went for a week to Caneel Bay in the Virgin Islands. Big, big mistake. The room was right on the beach, so we were outside sipping a pina colada on our lounge chairs watching the sunset. In the middle of the night I felt this horrible itching all over my legs. I was covered in thousands and thousands of bites. This time it was a black doctor in St. Thomas who had to treat me, with shots of penicillin, because I had impetigo from sand fleas. Meanwhile, my husband had turned a lovely brown and didn't have a single bite. I could happily have punched him. :)

    Have you read the journals of Livingston and Stanley or other men like them of their explorations of Africa? On day 18 we lost Fowler, etc. etc. Well, that would have been me. :)

    Pigmentation and all sorts of other traits are an adaptation to the environment: climate, altitude, food etc. There's nothing holy or objectively superior or inferior about any of it.

    I seem to be adapted for mountain life and northern latitudes. It's just the roll of the genetic dice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I don't think I could survive in the tropics.

    As I've mentioned, my parents and then I had a condo in Florida, which is pretty tropical, for decades. I spent a week there in May one year, which is technically still spring, and lived to regret it. I was slathered in the strongest sun screen I could find, and wore a hat, but somehow just the reflected sunlight "burned" my eyes. The itching and watering were unbearable but when I went to the doctor thinking it was some new allergy he explained it and said I had to wear wrap around sunglasses when I went outdoors. Mine were too small and let in too much light.

    In Mexico, at a hotel called Las Brisas, they provided you with little open sided jeeps with a cover. I thought for once I didn't need all that greasy cream. Well, the problem was I held onto the post for curves. That night my arm swelled up like a sausage. Doctors again.

    The worst was in Cape May, New Jersey soon after I married. Like an idiot I wanted to get a little color on my face so I didn't put sun screen on it. I fell asleep for two hours or so on the beach with one cheek exposed. In the middle of the night, feeling an incredible tightness in my face I went to the bathroom and screamed and cried in absolute terror. My entire face was swollen like a monster's, eyes squeezed shut, and a brilliant red. The emergency room doctors had to give me shots of steroids and steroid cream and I spent the rest of the vacation in the darkened hotel room. After he treated me, the doctor proceeded to yell at me and tell me that if I didn't want to die young of melanoma I'd stay out of the sun.

    So, my wish for one ancestral allele somewhere didn't stem from aesthetic considerations at all; I quite liked the color of my skin against my dark hair. :) It was a question of it being a burden in a lot of situations.

    The tropics are also not for me, unless they spray the hell out of it, because I'm a magnet for mosquitoes, sand fleas, you name it. Like an idiot, again, I wanted a "green" vacation, no nasty chemical spraying, yada, yada, yada, so once we went for a week to Caneel Bay in the Virgin Islands. Big, big mistake. The room was right on the beach, so we were outside sipping a pina colada on our lounge chairs watching the sunset. In the middle of the night I felt this horrible itching all over my legs. I was covered in thousands and thousands of bites. This time it was a black doctor in St. Thomas who had to treat me, with shots of penicillin, because I had impetigo from sand fleas. Meanwhile, my husband had turned a lovely brown and didn't have a single bite. I could happily have punched him. :)

    Have you read the journals of Livingston and Stanley or other men like them of their explorations of Africa? On day 18 we lost Fowler, etc. etc. Well, that would have been me. :)

    Pigmentation and all sorts of other traits are an adaptation to the environment: climate, altitude, food etc. There's nothing holy or objectively superior or inferior about any of it.

    I seem to be adapted for mountain life and northern latitudes. It's just the roll of the genetic dice.
    My wife and I love Rio de Janeiro. It is close to Belo Horizonte. From BH to the city of Rio de Janeiro it is 5 hours by car. In Belo Horizonte, I and my wife ​​have the same skin tone. In Rio de Janeiro I get black and she turns pink. I once called her a pink panther and she didn't like it very much, lol lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ack View Post
    Thank you for the link. Yes, there is certainly variation in Europe, but it seems to be something complex. I just tried to say that the allele mentioned is extremely common across Europe.
    it is also very common in the near east and also north africa. and if you look at the untanned skin complexion of people from there, their skin isn't much darker than the one of northern europeans. so 24A5 might really be one of the most if not the most important factor for depigmentation in westeurasia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I mentioned there was surprise that I, as an Italian, was completely derived for both SLC24A5 and SLC45A2.

    Until the publication of this paper just recently every paper I ever saw on pigmentation considered SLC45A2 one of the major de-pigmentation snps in Europe, and although levels are high in Europe, it's by no means fixed.

    As per the thread to which I linked...







    The following is 42A5, which everyone has considered important until now.

    I understood, but I never thought it was surprising that an Italian had all the alleles for fair skin because I always associated the main alleles for fair skin with farmers. But I imagine that to others it may seem somewhat unusual.









    [COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.54)]
    [/COLOR][COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.54)]
    [/COLOR]










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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I don't think I could survive in the tropics.

    As I've mentioned, my parents and then I had a condo in Florida, which is pretty tropical, for decades. I spent a week there in May one year, which is technically still spring, and lived to regret it. I was slathered in the strongest sun screen I could find, and wore a hat, but somehow just the reflected sunlight "burned" my eyes. The itching and watering were unbearable but when I went to the doctor thinking it was some new allergy he explained it and said I had to wear wrap around sunglasses when I went outdoors. Mine were too small and let in too much light.

    In Mexico, at a hotel called Las Brisas, they provided you with little open sided jeeps with a cover. I thought for once I didn't need all that greasy cream. Well, the problem was I held onto the post for curves. That night my arm swelled up like a sausage. Doctors again.

    The worst was in Cape May, New Jersey soon after I married. Like an idiot I wanted to get a little color on my face so I didn't put sun screen on it. I fell asleep for two hours or so on the beach with one cheek exposed. In the middle of the night, feeling an incredible tightness in my face I went to the bathroom and screamed and cried in absolute terror. My entire face was swollen like a monster's, eyes squeezed shut, and a brilliant red. The emergency room doctors had to give me shots of steroids and steroid cream and I spent the rest of the vacation in the darkened hotel room. After he treated me, the doctor proceeded to yell at me and tell me that if I didn't want to die young of melanoma I'd stay out of the sun.

    So, my wish for one ancestral allele somewhere didn't stem from aesthetic considerations at all; I quite liked the color of my skin against my dark hair. :) It was a question of it being a burden in a lot of situations.

    The tropics are also not for me, unless they spray the hell out of it, because I'm a magnet for mosquitoes, sand fleas, you name it. Like an idiot, again, I wanted a "green" vacation, no nasty chemical spraying, yada, yada, yada, so once we went for a week to Caneel Bay in the Virgin Islands. Big, big mistake. The room was right on the beach, so we were outside sipping a pina colada on our lounge chairs watching the sunset. In the middle of the night I felt this horrible itching all over my legs. I was covered in thousands and thousands of bites. This time it was a black doctor in St. Thomas who had to treat me, with shots of penicillin, because I had impetigo from sand fleas. Meanwhile, my husband had turned a lovely brown and didn't have a single bite. I could happily have punched him. :)

    Have you read the journals of Livingston and Stanley or other men like them of their explorations of Africa? On day 18 we lost Fowler, etc. etc. Well, that would have been me. :)

    Pigmentation and all sorts of other traits are an adaptation to the environment: climate, altitude, food etc. There's nothing holy or objectively superior or inferior about any of it.

    I seem to be adapted for mountain life and northern latitudes. It's just the roll of the genetic dice.
    You seem to have the so-called "milk skin", so I believe it must be even worst for you than it is for me under strong sunlight. At least you lived all your life at a relatively high latitude area. :)
    My mother-in-law apparently has similar SNP results than yours. She took lot and lot of sun all her life, and she didn't really tan. She got a bit "spotted" (not sure it's the term), and sun made her looks slightly older perhaps. Anyway, there is no skin cancer running in her family, and I doubt she'll have it. Her family is actually pretty "longevous".
    They say my maternal grandfather also had this type of (extremely white) skin. He was tagliapietra, and lived all his life close to latitude 30, so imagine! He didn't die of skin cancer, but his face looked permanently sort of skinned, or something (not sure it's the word). On the other hand, my father talked us about a paternal aunt of him that was pretty swarthy. She called Olimpia, but she was known as aunt "Mora" for this reason. She must have casually inherited the dominant alleles for pigmentation from her parents. It's very interesting how they may combine differently in the same family.
    I got burned many times in my "tropical" life, je je. The last one, few years ago, was kind of intentional (not the burning itself), but I regreted. I was visiting a place called Pirenópolis, in the state of Goiás. I convinced myself at that moment, in a waterfall, that I should get more tanned. Then the genious took lots and lots of it in that afternoon. It didn't look "that" strong while I took it. Unnecessary to explain the results, especially in upper body. One of the worst parts is when the burning starts to get better, 'cause it itches a lot. I tried to relieve it with a wet towel (IIRC, I even slept with it), je je. I'll try it again sometime, because I know I do tan at certain degree (at least more than my parents and certain siblings), but I'll try it in a different way, of course. In my youth I took lots and lots of sun (way more than I take now), and I did tan a bit, which proves it's possible. :) It doesn't mean I'm a heat/sunlight lover. It's just that suntan could have helped in tropics, and it would also have avoided that "ghost looking". I actually love mountains, and I do like cold and cloudy weather (likely an issue related to my retina).

    By the way, I think dark hair and white skin a beautiful combination. Caitriona Balfe, for example:

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    You seem to have the so-called "milk skin", so I believe it must be even worst for you than it is for me under strong sunlight. At least you lived all your life at a relatively high latitude area. :)
    My mother-in-law apparently has similar SNP results than yours. She took lot and lot of sun all her life, and she didn't really tan. She got a bit "spotted" (not sure it's the term), and sun made her looks slightly older perhaps. Anyway, there is no skin cancer running in her family, and I doubt she'll have it. Her family is actually pretty "longevous".
    They say my maternal grandfather also had this type of (extremely white) skin. He was tagliapietra, and lived all his life close to latitude 30, so imagine! He didn't die of skin cancer, but his face looked permanently sort of skinned, or something (not sure it's the word). On the other hand, my father talked us about a paternal aunt of him that was pretty swarthy. She called Olimpia, but she was known as aunt "Mora" for this reason. She must have casually inherited the dominant alleles for pigmentation from her parents. It's very interesting how they may combine differently in the same family.
    I got burned many times in my "tropical" life, je je. The last one, few years ago, was kind of intentional (not the burning itself), but I regreted. I was visiting a place called Pirenópolis, in the state of Goiás. I convinced myself at that moment, in a waterfall, that I should get more tanned. Then the genious took lots and lots of it in that afternoon. It didn't look "that" strong while I took it. Unnecessary to explain the results, especially in upper body. One of the worst parts is when the burning starts to get better, 'cause it itches a lot. I tried to relieve it with a wet towel (IIRC, I even slept with it), je je. I'll try it again sometime, because I know I do tan at certain degree (at least more than my parents and certain siblings), but I'll try it in a different way, of course. In my youth I took lots and lots of sun (way more than I take now), and I did tan a bit, which proves it's possible. :) It doesn't mean I'm a heat/sunlight lover. It's just that suntan could have helped in tropics, and it would also have avoided that "ghost looking". I actually love mountains, and I do like cold and cloudy weather (likely an issue related to my retina).

    By the way, I think dark hair associated to white skin a beautiful combination. Caitriona Balfe, for example:
    yes....same as my sister and father hair colour and also youngest son ....................sister milky skin, but the men not so, they can tan in the sun

    my son has bluer coloured eyes than the above picture .....................his son has same colour as him

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regio X View Post
    You seem to have the so-called "milk skin", so I believe it must be even worst for you than it is for me under strong sunlight. At least you lived all your life at a relatively high latitude area. :)
    My mother-in-law apparently has similar SNP results than yours. She took lot and lot of sun all her life, and she didn't really tan. She got a bit "spotted" (not sure it's the term), and sun made her looks slightly older perhaps. Anyway, there is no skin cancer running in her family, and I doubt she'll have it. Her family is actually pretty "longevous".
    They say my maternal grandfather also had this type of (extremely white) skin. He was tagliapietra, and lived all his life close to latitude 30, so imagine! He didn't die of skin cancer, but his face looked permanently sort of skinned, or something (not sure it's the word). On the other hand, my father talked us about a paternal aunt of him that was pretty swarthy. She called Olimpia, but she was known as aunt "Mora" for this reason. She must have casually inherited the dominant alleles for pigmentation from her parents. It's very interesting how they may combine differently in the same family.
    I got burned many times in my "tropical" life, je je. The last one, few years ago, was kind of intentional (not the burning itself), but I regreted. I was visiting a place called Pirenópolis, in the state of Goiás. I convinced myself at that moment, in a waterfall, that I should get more tanned. Then the genious took lots and lots of it in that afternoon. It didn't look "that" strong while I took it. Unnecessary to explain the results, especially in upper body. One of the worst parts is when the burning starts to get better, 'cause it itches a lot. I tried to relieve it with a wet towel (IIRC, I even slept with it), je je. I'll try it again sometime, because I know I do tan at certain degree (at least more than my parents and certain siblings), but I'll try it in a different way, of course. In my youth I took lots and lots of sun (way more than I take now), and I did tan a bit, which proves it's possible. :) It doesn't mean I'm a heat/sunlight lover. It's just that suntan could have helped in tropics, and it would also have avoided that "ghost looking". I actually love mountains, and I do like cold and cloudy weather (likely an issue related to my retina).

    By the way, I think dark hair and white skin a beautiful combination. Caitriona Balfe, for example:
    She's a bit ruddy in coloring. My coloring is closer to Michele Dockery or Tiziana Piergianni, a sort of, as you said, "milk" color with bluish undertones, no ruddiness, no freckles. I also have brown eyes which makes it even more unusual to people. I've always gotten a lot of "What are you?" here in the U.S. :) I got my mother's dark hair and dark eyes, and my father's skin color, but minus the tendency to freckle, thank goodness. That would have been even more weird. It's certainly gotten me my fair share of attention, but you can look very washed out minus eye makeup, lipstick and blush. You know, like Dracula's bride after he's drained all the blood out of her. :) Almost every time I would see my doctor he would remark on my paleness and do a Vitamin D and anemia screen. In between he would forget it's just my natural coloring.

    (We actually went to a number of Halloween parties as Dracula and his bride. I barely had to do anything at all other than paint bite marks on my neck and wear a negligee. :))

    Here's Michele Dockery all made up. There's foundation and bronzer and blush on her face. The arms are her real color. Like a bottle of milk, indeed.



    Tiziana Piergianni...in most of her modeling shots she's spray tanned up the wazoo.


    When I was a little girl and my parents would take me to the beach at Fiascherino or Monterosso, I would get huge blisters on my shoulders, my back, even my feet. When they popped and the skin had to be disinfected it was agony. She used to put Calamine lotion on my skin when we got here. I don't even know if they sell it any more. I think part of the problem may be that I have very small pores, so I don't think I cool off from sweating as much as most people. Meanwhile, I love the beach and the sun. The sun just doesn't love me.

    Anyway, enough of that. That should be someone's biggest problem, right?

    I do, btw, get a bit of a tan if I go very slow and easy: 15 minutes one day, half hour a day for a couple of days, maybe up to an hour a day, but never in Florida in summer or anything like that. Problem is that no one knows I have a tan! :)
    Last edited by Angela; 17-05-20 at 17:34.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    She's a bit ruddy in coloring. My coloring is closer to Michele Dockery or Tiziana Piergianni, a sort of, as you said, "milk" color with bluish undertones, no ruddiness, no freckles. I also have brown eyes which makes it even more unusual to people. I've always gotten a lot of "What are you?" here in the U.S. :) I got my mother's dark hair and dark eyes, and my father's skin color, but minus the tendency to freckle, thank goodness. That would have been even more weird. It's certainly gotten me my fair share of attention, but you can look very washed out minus eye makeup, lipstick and blush. You know, like Dracula's bride after he's drained all the blood out of her. :) Almost every time I would see my doctor he would remark on my paleness and do a Vitamin D and anemia screen. In between he would forget it's just my natural coloring.

    (We actually went to a number of Halloween parties as Dracula and his bride. I barely had to do anything at all other than paint bite marks on my neck and wear a negligee. :))

    Here's Michele Dockery all made up. There's foundation and bronzer and blush on her face. The arms are her real color. Like a bottle of milk, indeed.



    Tiziana Piergianni...in most of her modeling shots she's spray tanned up the wazoo.


    When I was a little girl and my parents would take me to the beach at Fiascherino or Monterosso, I would get huge blisters on my shoulders, my back, even my feet. When they popped and the skin had to be disinfected it was agony. She used to put Calamine lotion on my skin when we got here. I don't even know if they sell it any more. I think part of the problem may be that I have very small pores, so I don't think I cool off from sweating as much as most people. Meanwhile, I love the beach and the sun. The sun just doesn't love me.

    Anyway, enough of that. That should be someone's biggest problem, right?
    Yes, apparently she is a bit ruddy. In scenes of Outlander I had the impression she was white (less ruddy) though. Perhaps it was just a makeup, in order to fit her better to the character? Well, she's certainly beautiful, and there is an interesting contrast anyway.

    As for Halloween parties, ah ah ah, well, perhaps Morticia Addams would have worked too. Have you ever tried this one? :)

    Concerning the vit D, something similar happened to me once when doing a "check up". The doctor thought I had some problem, based on my skin, then I just told him that it was my normal, je je. That was in an area where people are much more swarthy on average, which possibly explains his impression. In USA it would have been another story, I guess.

    Regarding "climate preferences", I think you'd like cloudy weather in a tropical place as well. :) I tend to have problem with sunlight, in special without sun glasses, but naturally it depends on strenght (latitude, month of the year, or on the time of the day simply). "Weaker" sun is ok. Like it too. But heat... Nah. I'm hot-natured.
    Perhaps a factoid, but I remember to have read that these preferences such for sunny or cloudy weather could be related to certain SNPs as well. Didn't find them now. But I remember my results made sense in front of my actual preferences. Perhaps a coincidence.
    Finally, I prefer mountains anyway (since ever), but I like beaches under many clouds and air temperature below 23-24, je je je. Last year my wife almost literally dragged me to the beach. Twice. The second experience was decent when it comes to weather. I was lucky. But the first... It affected even my mood.
    I felt in paradise once in "Praia Brava", Florianópolis. It was summer, but the sky was completely covered by clouds, with wind and relatively mild temperature (~23). I took a happy beach bath. My girlfriend (now wife) thought I was crazy. Hope she was wrong. Lol

    The place where I was born is close to latitude 30°, so the sun may be very strong in there. But it's at least a sort of Sierra (technically, it'd be an escarpment), many times rainny, with fogs etc. and no drier season. It helped. But then I moved to a completely different place, certainly worst for me when it comes to climate. Well, that's life. :) Funnily, some locals find the place cold. Lol

    Believe me, milk folks tend to end up with very different skin tone in the tropics, unless you spend most of the day indoor in most part of your life, or use sunblock all the time, which is not usual. You would not necessarily become tanned, but your color would change to something else, even if it took long.
    Not sure how to describe it, but some milkies eventually get a bit tanned (ones more, others less...), while others keep pinkish - or something - most of the time, or highly spotted, and on and on. You likely know it, since US has many areas with strong sunlight and white people.
    Cancer is another thing. Original skin tone must compete in some way, of course, but it's not the whole story. Mother-in-law and maternal grandparent are examples of milkies that took lots of sun by whole life and didn't get cancer. In her case, I'm based on her genetic similarity to you.
    My parents were similar in skin tone, with the difference my father is more "spotted". He's even more careful than her in protecting from the sun; still, he had to extract carcinoma already (IIRC, one in arm and other in the back), as a (ex-)mikie brother of mine (in turn extracted from his face). Point is that additional SNPs must play a role. I myself extracted a "thing" close to one eye, but at the end biopsy showed it was nothing bad. Surgeon said the procedure could "deform" that area, but I've gone ahead and thankfully it didn't happen.
    So, that heterozygosity at SLC24A5 seems very relevant, as per my wife's tone, and it could have been good for my son. Pity the allele was missed.

    Btw, you should not blame your father. Your mother is responsible for the other half. Lol
    Just kidding. I understand what you mean. ;)

    I do, btw, get a bit of a tan if I go very slow and easy: 15 minutes one day, half hour a day for a couple of days, maybe up to an hour a day, but never in Florida in summer or anything like that. Problem is that no one knows I have a tan! :)
    That's precisely what I wanna do. Tanned skin is a good and "practical" sunblocker, and taking some sun (in the right way) is good.

    Yeah, enough with this (quasi-)off-topic. :)

    Cheers
    Last edited by Regio X; 17-05-20 at 19:13.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    She's a bit ruddy in coloring. My coloring is closer to Michele Dockery or Tiziana Piergianni, a sort of, as you said, "milk" color with bluish undertones, no ruddiness, no freckles. I also have brown eyes which makes it even more unusual to people. I've always gotten a lot of "What are you?" here in the U.S. :) I got my mother's dark hair and dark eyes, and my father's skin color, but minus the tendency to freckle, thank goodness. That would have been even more weird. It's certainly gotten me my fair share of attention, but you can look very washed out minus eye makeup, lipstick and blush. You know, like Dracula's bride after he's drained all the blood out of her. :) Almost every time I would see my doctor he would remark on my paleness and do a Vitamin D and anemia screen. In between he would forget it's just my natural coloring.

    (We actually went to a number of Halloween parties as Dracula and his bride. I barely had to do anything at all other than paint bite marks on my neck and wear a negligee. :))

    Here's Michele Dockery all made up. There's foundation and bronzer and blush on her face. The arms are her real color. Like a bottle of milk, indeed.



    Tiziana Piergianni...in most of her modeling shots she's spray tanned up the wazoo.


    When I was a little girl and my parents would take me to the beach at Fiascherino or Monterosso, I would get huge blisters on my shoulders, my back, even my feet. When they popped and the skin had to be disinfected it was agony. She used to put Calamine lotion on my skin when we got here. I don't even know if they sell it any more. I think part of the problem may be that I have very small pores, so I don't think I cool off from sweating as much as most people. Meanwhile, I love the beach and the sun. The sun just doesn't love me.

    Anyway, enough of that. That should be someone's biggest problem, right?

    I do, btw, get a bit of a tan if I go very slow and easy: 15 minutes one day, half hour a day for a couple of days, maybe up to an hour a day, but never in Florida in summer or anything like that. Problem is that no one knows I have a tan! :)

    Judging by the description you would be the base color Mac NC10. I am a hairdresser and makeup artist. My color is NC15, but here in Brazil my clients usually use NC20 and NC25. I have a redheaded client who is NC5.
    In a makeup course we learned that brown eyed customers are rarely below NC20, but I have had brown eyed customers NC15 and NC10.





    I am a mixture of NC15 and NC10 and my eyes are green. The NC10 is too bright and the 15 is dark. When I mix the two it is right.

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