Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Kinship, acquired and inherited status, and population structure at the Early Bronze

  1. #1
    Regular Member Achievements:
    Veteran5000 Experience Points
    kingjohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-09-16
    Posts
    513
    Points
    8,666
    Level
    27
    Points: 8,666, Level: 27
    Level completed: 86%, Points required for next Level: 84
    Overall activity: 89.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    E-CTS1096

    Country: Uruguay



    5 members found this post helpful.

    Kinship, acquired and inherited status, and population structure at the Early Bronze

    Kinship, acquired and inherited status, and population structure at the Early Bronze Age Mokrin necropolis in northern Serbia.
    Aleksandra Zegarac, Laura Winkelbach, Jens Bloecher, Yoan Diekmann, Marija Kreckovic Gavrilovic, Marko Porcic, Biljana Stojkovic, Lidija Milasinovic, Mona Schreiber, Daniel Wegmann, Krishna R Veeramah, Sofija Stefanovic, Joachim Burger
    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.05.18.101337
    This article is a preprint and has not been certified by peer review [what does this mean?].
    AbstractInfo/HistoryMetrics Preview PDF
    Abstract
    Twenty-four ancient genomes with an average sequencing coverage of 0.85 were produced from the Mokrin necropolis, an Early Bronze Age (2,100-1,800 BC) Maros culture site in Serbia, to provide unambiguous identification of biological sex, population structure, and genetic kinship between individuals. Of the 24 investigated individuals, 15 were involved in kinship relationships of varying degrees, including 3 parent-offspring relationships. All observed parent-offspring pairs were mother and son. In addition to the absence of biological daughters, we observed a number of young women and girls with no biological relatives in our sample. These observations, together with the high mitochondrial diversity in our sample, are consistent with the practice of female exogamy in the population served by Mokrin. However, moderate-to-high Y-chromosomal diversity suggests a degree of male mobility greater than that expected under strict patrilocality. Individual status differences at Mokrin, as indicated by grave goods, support the inference that females could inherit status, but could not transmit status to all their sons. The case of a son whose grave good richness outstrips that of his biological mother suggests that sons had the possibility to acquire status during their lifetimes. The Mokrin sample resembles a genetically unstructured population, suggesting that the social hierarchies of the community were not accompanied by strict marriage barriers.

    ( r1b , I2 , j2b , bt)



    mt haplogr. Y haplogr.
    122E XY 6-9 1.09 U5a2b1a I2a1b

    122S XX 35-50 0.78 H32 *

    161 XX 9-11 1.20 H80 *

    163 XY 45-55 1.21 U4a2 J2b

    181 XX >18 0.62 U4a2 *

    186 XX 8-11 0.33 H1aj *

    211 XY 50-55 0.79 U5a2b1a I2a1b

    220 XY 15-25 0.64 T2b11 R1b1a2a2c1

    223 XX 7-10 0.39 U3a1 *

    224 XX 25-40 0.77 T2b *

    225 XY 25-35 0.82 J1b1a1 R1b1a2a2c1

    228 XX 35-50 0.95 J1c *

    237 XX 15-20 0.89 T2b *

    243 XY 20-35 1.12 H BT

    246 XX 45-50 0.98 H80 *

    247 XX 10-12 0.90 H1 *

    257 A XX 40-60 0.60 H *

    257 B XY inf.I 0.61 K1a4 R1b1a2a2c1a1

    260 XY 15-18 0.92 J1c I2a2a1a2a2

    282 XY 15-20 1.41 H2b BT

    287 XX 20-35 0.81 U5b2a2c *

    288 XX 60+ 0.81 HV0e *

    295 XY 15-20 0.82 H80 I2a1a

    302 XX 20-35 0.89 J1c *

  2. #2
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    17,793
    Points
    387,686
    Level
    100
    Points: 387,686, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by kingjohn View Post
    Kinship, acquired and inherited status, and population structure at the Early Bronze Age Mokrin necropolis in northern Serbia.
    Aleksandra Zegarac, Laura Winkelbach, Jens Bloecher, Yoan Diekmann, Marija Kreckovic Gavrilovic, Marko Porcic, Biljana Stojkovic, Lidija Milasinovic, Mona Schreiber, Daniel Wegmann, Krishna R Veeramah, Sofija Stefanovic, Joachim Burger
    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.05.18.101337
    This article is a preprint and has not been certified by peer review [what does this mean?].
    AbstractInfo/HistoryMetrics Preview PDF
    Abstract
    Twenty-four ancient genomes with an average sequencing coverage of 0.85 were produced from the Mokrin necropolis, an Early Bronze Age (2,100-1,800 BC) Maros culture site in Serbia, to provide unambiguous identification of biological sex, population structure, and genetic kinship between individuals. Of the 24 investigated individuals, 15 were involved in kinship relationships of varying degrees, including 3 parent-offspring relationships. All observed parent-offspring pairs were mother and son. In addition to the absence of biological daughters, we observed a number of young women and girls with no biological relatives in our sample. These observations, together with the high mitochondrial diversity in our sample, are consistent with the practice of female exogamy in the population served by Mokrin. However, moderate-to-high Y-chromosomal diversity suggests a degree of male mobility greater than that expected under strict patrilocality. Individual status differences at Mokrin, as indicated by grave goods, support the inference that females could inherit status, but could not transmit status to all their sons. The case of a son whose grave good richness outstrips that of his biological mother suggests that sons had the possibility to acquire status during their lifetimes. The Mokrin sample resembles a genetically unstructured population, suggesting that the social hierarchies of the community were not accompanied by strict marriage barriers.
    ( r1b , I2 , j2b , bt)
    mt haplogr. Y haplogr.
    122E XY 6-9 1.09 U5a2b1a I2a1b
    122S XX 35-50 0.78 H32 *
    161 XX 9-11 1.20 H80 *
    163 XY 45-55 1.21 U4a2 J2b
    181 XX >18 0.62 U4a2 *
    186 XX 8-11 0.33 H1aj *
    211 XY 50-55 0.79 U5a2b1a I2a1b
    220 XY 15-25 0.64 T2b11 R1b1a2a2c1
    223 XX 7-10 0.39 U3a1 *
    224 XX 25-40 0.77 T2b *
    225 XY 25-35 0.82 J1b1a1 R1b1a2a2c1
    228 XX 35-50 0.95 J1c *
    237 XX 15-20 0.89 T2b *
    243 XY 20-35 1.12 H BT
    246 XX 45-50 0.98 H80 *
    247 XX 10-12 0.90 H1 *
    257 A XX 40-60 0.60 H *
    257 B XY inf.I 0.61 K1a4 R1b1a2a2c1a1
    260 XY 15-18 0.92 J1c I2a2a1a2a2
    282 XY 15-20 1.41 H2b BT
    287 XX 20-35 0.81 U5b2a2c *
    288 XX 60+ 0.81 HV0e *
    295 XY 15-20 0.82 H80 I2a1a
    302 XX 20-35 0.89 J1c *
    Interesting. Only one J2b, but lots of I2a1. If J2b was brought by the steppe people I would have expected more. Certainly, it didn't take the Slavs to bring the I2a1. There's one I2a2 as well, probably local.

    Lots of mtDna U5, vast majority probably from the steppe.

    WHG 8%
    "Aegean Neolithic" 55%
    Steppe 37%

    Anyone know off hand the steppe percentage in today's Serbs? It won't be exact because for precision you would need to be using the same reference samples, but it might be interesting.

    Of course, the steppe number could have gone down with the "resurgence" of EEF ancestry that always seems to have happened, and then gone back up again with the Slavic migrations. Or, the Slavic migrations didn't have quite as large an impact as we thought.


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  3. #3
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    17,793
    Points
    387,686
    Level
    100
    Points: 387,686, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Nine females were not related to anyone, and scattered throughout the burial ground. I wonder if they were still practising the Indo-European "bride kidnapping", a la "Rapine of the Sabines".
    As far as pigmentation is concerned:
    SLC24A5 1 (So, already fixed)
    SLC42A5 71% (Not very high compared to modern European populations, although as they point out, it's at 82% in Spain.
    HERC2 45% (Similar to modern day Tuscans.)

    It seems they didn't see the latest Mathiesen paper on depigmentation. If he's right there are other snps which are more important than SLC45A2.

    I haven't gotten to the supplement, but I think the HERC2 derived number must include a lot of heterozygous samples. That's how it works in Italy too. The northern half of the country has higher Herc 2 than one would think looking the people's eyes.

    Basically, I guess they looked like Tuscans and Spaniards.

  4. #4
    Advisor Achievements:
    VeteranThree Friends50000 Experience PointsRecommendation Second Class
    Awards:
    Posting Award
    Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    17,793
    Points
    387,686
    Level
    100
    Points: 387,686, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    Has anyone found the Supplement?

    Just saw that 4 of the samples had no WHG at all.

    That would hint that perhaps, as I said, there was very little WHG in the Balkans before the arrival of the steppe people.

    There's no question that it was a very minor player.

  5. #5
    Advisor Achievements:
    Three FriendsVeteran50000 Experience Points
    bicicleur's Avatar
    Join Date
    27-01-13
    Location
    Zwevegem, Belgium
    Posts
    5,709
    Points
    56,856
    Level
    73
    Points: 56,856, Level: 73
    Level completed: 88%, Points required for next Level: 194
    Overall activity: 23.0%


    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    R1b1a2a2c1

    which one is this? what SNPs characterise this subclade?

  6. #6
    Advisor Achievements:
    Three FriendsVeteran50000 Experience Points
    bicicleur's Avatar
    Join Date
    27-01-13
    Location
    Zwevegem, Belgium
    Posts
    5,709
    Points
    56,856
    Level
    73
    Points: 56,856, Level: 73
    Level completed: 88%, Points required for next Level: 194
    Overall activity: 23.0%


    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Has anyone found the Supplement?
    Just saw that 4 of the samples had no WHG at all.
    That would hint that perhaps, as I said, there was very little WHG in the Balkans before the arrival of the steppe people.
    There's no question that it was a very minor player.
    European genetic variation, clustering in the midst of modern northern, eastern, and southern
    Europeans (Fig. S5).
    We estimated individual admixture proportions under the assumption that the composition of
    a European Bronze Age population can be sufficiently modeled with three components:
    western hunter gatherers, Aegean Neolithic farmers, and eastern European steppe-like
    populations. We observed no significant variation in the eastern European steppe-like
    component between individuals (Fig. S6, Table S6). Pooling individuals, admixture proportions
    are estimated to be around 8% (± 1.2% standard error (SE)) western hunter gatherers, 55% (±
    2.5% SE) Aegean Neolithic farmers, and 37% (± 2.3% SE) Eastern European steppe-like
    population (Fig. S7). Quantification of shared drift to other temporally and geographically close
    ancient individuals via outgroup f3 statistics did not reveal any particularly close affinities (Fig.
    S8), reflecting the genetic homogenization of Europe during the Bronze Age.

  7. #7
    Regular Member Achievements:
    1 year registered10000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    25-06-18
    Posts
    1,019
    Points
    11,723
    Level
    32
    Points: 11,723, Level: 32
    Level completed: 68%, Points required for next Level: 227
    Overall activity: 57.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-M269 (LDNA)
    MtDNA haplogroup
    U5a1b

    Ethnic group
    Thracian
    Country: Greece



    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur View Post
    R1b1a2a2c1
    which one is this? what SNPs characterise this subclade?
    Z2105+ from looking at some tables

  8. #8
    Banned Achievements:
    10000 Experience Points1 year registered

    Join Date
    10-05-19
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,261
    Points
    17,705
    Level
    40
    Points: 17,705, Level: 40
    Level completed: 57%, Points required for next Level: 345
    Overall activity: 15.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    T1a2 - BY143483
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H95a1

    Ethnic group
    North Italian
    Country: Australia



    the areas and time period covers the Vatin culture

    https://www.academia.edu/2250330/WEL..._CENTURY_AFTER

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vatin_culture

    the area is also part of later proto-Triballi Thracian people

  9. #9
    Regular Member Achievements:
    1000 Experience Points1 year registered

    Join Date
    04-03-18
    Posts
    408
    Points
    4,309
    Level
    19
    Points: 4,309, Level: 19
    Level completed: 15%, Points required for next Level: 341
    Overall activity: 26.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    E-A24070
    MtDNA haplogroup
    I1a1a

    Ethnic group
    Pecheneg
    Country: Bosnia & Herzegovina



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by torzio View Post
    the areas and time period covers the Vatin culture
    This is not the Vatin culture. Vatin culture is MBA, this is late EBA. This is Maros culture, Vatin culture succeeded the Maros culture in many/most areas. There were already two samples of Maros culture before RISE373, RISE374 without the Y-DNA.

    Vatin culture practiced cremation mostly.

    It does look like some J-L283 is likely there. Might be a good candidate to pinpoint its origins, as Maros was also derived of some earlier cultures.

    No E-V13, so this tells me V13 is not tied to Pannonian areal at all. But I believe it is connected to Glina III-Schneckenberg, at least the E-CTS1273. Maros had some trade relations with them. There are no Romanian aDNA BA finds atm at all.

    Also it seems R-CTS7556 was found!!

  10. #10
    Regular Member Achievements:
    10000 Experience PointsThree FriendsVeteran
    Johane Derite's Avatar
    Join Date
    21-06-17
    Posts
    1,128
    Points
    20,452
    Level
    43
    Points: 20,452, Level: 43
    Level completed: 67%, Points required for next Level: 298
    Overall activity: 98.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    E-V13>Z5018>FGC33625
    MtDNA haplogroup
    U1a1a

    Country: Albania



    2 members found this post helpful.
    The j2b sample according to the paper is "buried with grave goods indicative of higher social status". This J2b (almost definitely l283), taken in conjuction with the three R1b's the same as those of albanians, is consistent with having come from the steppe together.

    No one says all I2a1 was brought by slavs, its the specific clades of cts10228 that south slavs have major founder effects in that came with the slavic migrations.

    For example the two main ones i2a-s17250 & I2a-z17855. Those branches were not part of paleobalkan ethnicities like illyrians, thracian.

    Lbk had i2a1, that is not controversial.

    "As we have already stressed, the mass evacuation of the Albanians from their triangle is the only effective course we can take. In order to relocate a whole people, the first prerequisite is the creation of a suitable psychosis. This can be done in various ways." - Vaso Cubrilovic

  11. #11
    Regular Member Achievements:
    1000 Experience PointsVeteran
    ihype02's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-10-16
    Posts
    434
    Points
    3,735
    Level
    17
    Points: 3,735, Level: 17
    Level completed: 72%, Points required for next Level: 115
    Overall activity: 27.0%


    Country: Albania



    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Interesting. Only one J2b, but lots of I2a1. If J2b was brought by the steppe people I would have expected more. Certainly, it didn't take the Slavs to bring the I2a1. There's one I2a2 as well, probably local.

    Lots of mtDna U5, vast majority probably from the steppe.

    WHG 8%
    "Aegean Neolithic" 55%
    Steppe 37%

    Anyone know off hand the steppe percentage in today's Serbs? It won't be exact because for precision you would need to be using the same reference samples, but it might be interesting.

    Of course, the steppe number could have gone down with the "resurgence" of EEF ancestry that always seems to have happened, and then gone back up again with the Slavic migrations. Or, the Slavic migrations didn't have quite as large an impact as we thought.
    Is it the Slavic subclade?

  12. #12
    Regular Member Achievements:
    1000 Experience PointsVeteran

    Join Date
    09-01-17
    Posts
    248
    Points
    3,438
    Level
    16
    Points: 3,438, Level: 16
    Level completed: 97%, Points required for next Level: 12
    Overall activity: 6.0%

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    J1-P58
    MtDNA haplogroup
    T1a1l

    Ethnic group
    Gheg Albanian-Kelmendi clan(Joined) but with supposed origin from Montenegro
    Country: United Kingdom



    2 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by ihype02 View Post
    Is it the Slavic subclade?
    The samples are only labelled as I2a1b, so I2a-M423 since the classifications are based on older nomenclature. I think that if we look at the current data, it's very unlikely that these samples are related to the Slavic clusters of CTS10228.

    It's possible that they are M423>L161, possibly related to L161>Y13331 which has been found in a number of Bulgarians.

    The other I2a1 sample is I-M26, wouldn't surprise me if there's a relation with the M26 found in the samples from the Baden Culture of Hungary.
    Ydna: J-ZS241

    mtDNA: T1a1l

    Maternal Ydna: E-V13>CTS5856*

  13. #13
    Regular Member Achievements:
    1000 Experience PointsVeteran
    ihype02's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-10-16
    Posts
    434
    Points
    3,735
    Level
    17
    Points: 3,735, Level: 17
    Level completed: 72%, Points required for next Level: 115
    Overall activity: 27.0%


    Country: Albania



    Quote Originally Posted by Kelmendasi View Post
    The samples are only labelled as I2a1b, so I2a-M423 since the classifications are based on older nomenclature. I think that if we look at the current data, it's very unlikely that these samples are related to the Slavic clusters of CTS10228.

    It's possible that they are M423>L161, possibly related to L161>Y13331 which has been found in a number of Bulgarians.

    The other I2a1 sample is I-M26, wouldn't surprise me if there's a relation with the M26 found in the samples from the Baden Culture of Hungary.
    Bulgarians have 35% to 40% I2a-Slavic and slavic R1a. Early Slavs were 2/3 to 3/4 of I2a and R1a but not entirely.
    Will we get to see them in the autosomal PCA? :)

  14. #14
    Junior Member Achievements:
    1 year registered1000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    04-10-18
    Posts
    1
    Points
    1,234
    Level
    9
    Points: 1,234, Level: 9
    Level completed: 43%, Points required for next Level: 116
    Overall activity: 0%


    Country: Serbia



    SFI-35 Iron Age III male I2a1b-M436 R0a1a
    ERS4542983
    SFI-35 Beirut SFI-1075 Iron Age III 5 0.3 321,527

  15. #15
    Satyavrata Achievements:
    Three FriendsRecommendation First ClassVeteran50000 Experience PointsTagger First Class
    Maciamo's Avatar
    Join Date
    17-07-02
    Location
    Lothier
    Posts
    9,030
    Points
    757,577
    Level
    100
    Points: 757,577, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 54.0%


    Ethnic group
    Italo-celto-germanic
    Country: Belgium - Brussels



    The 24 samples tested are from the Periam-Pecica/Mureş culture, which covered northern Serbia, southeastern Hungary and western Romania. It is contemporary with the late Bell Beaker phenomenon and the Unetice culture.

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Interesting. Only one J2b, but lots of I2a1. If J2b was brought by the steppe people I would have expected more. Certainly, it didn't take the Slavs to bring the I2a1. There's one I2a2 as well, probably local.
    The paper says that most of the tested males are related, so the fact that there are lots of I2a1 does not necessarily reflect a high percentage of I2a1 in the region - just in that family. Likewise the J2b and I2a2 are outsiders to that local clan.

    I2a1 and I2a2 were found throughout Mesolithic Europe and survived in many Neolithic cultures too. Yet, none of the Mesolithic and Neolithic samples belong to the Slavic I2a1b-CTS10228. So it is undeniable that a more recent migration in the Late Antiquity diffused I2a1b-CTS10228 around central, SE and eastern Europe. I very much doubt that the origin of that migration was in the Balkans. The source was probably more around Belarus.

    Lots of mtDna U5, vast majority probably from the steppe.
    Not so sure. The U5 from the Yamna and subsequent Steppe cultures + in Corded Ware is typically U5a1. Here the samples are U5a2b and U5b2a, which have been found in Epipaleolithic France, Mesolithic Sweden and Neolithic Germany, but not in the Steppe.

    Likewise, the U4 in Yamna and Corded Ware is U4a1, but in LBA Serbia we see U4a2, which is more central-northern European in origin.
    There are a few Steppe mt-haplogroups though, such as H2b and J1b1a.

    WHG 8%
    "Aegean Neolithic" 55%
    Steppe 37%
    There is far more Steppe aDNA than uniparental haplogroups suggest.
    My book selection---Follow me on Facebook and Twitter --- My profile on Academia.edu and on ResearchGate ----Check Wa-pedia's Japan Guide
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "What is the use of living, if it be not to strive for noble causes and to make this muddled world a better place for those who will live in it after we are gone?", Winston Churchill.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •