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Thread: Hunter Gatherer artwork in Britain

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    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    Hunter Gatherer artwork in Britain

    See:
    https://www.archaeology.org/news/897...ian-plaquettes

    "LONDON, ENGLAND—BBC News reports that ten stone tablets etched with straight and curved lines have been discovered among hearths, pits, tools, and flints at the archaeological site of Les Varines on the southeastern side of the Channel Island of Jersey. Known as plaquettes, the stones are thought to have been engraved between 23,000 and 14,000 years ago by Magdalenians—hunter-gatherers who migrated out of Spain, Portugal, and southern France during the last Ice Age. “Many of the lines, including the curved, concentric designs, appear to have been made through layered or repeated incisions,” said Silvia Bello of the Natural History Museum. Some of the lines may be abstract representations of horses, mammoths, and a human face, she added, although the images are simpler than those on plaquettes recovered from other Magdalenian sites. Chantal Conneller of Newcastle University said that the people at Les Varines may have been pioneer colonizers of the region."

    I don't see it myself, but I'll take their word for it.




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    Thanks for posting Angela :)

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    I find this interesting, since my great-grandfather was born in Jersey. However, I wouldn't say this artwork was British. For historical reasons within the last 1,000 years, Jersey belongs to the UK, but to call Jersey part of Britain or one of the British Isles is, I think, misleading in the context of the last Ice Age. Until about 5,000 BC Jersey was not an island but part of continental France.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamakore View Post
    I find this interesting, since my great-grandfather was born in Jersey. However, I wouldn't say this artwork was British. For historical reasons within the last 1,000 years, Jersey belongs to the UK, but to call Jersey part of Britain or one of the British Isles is, I think, misleading in the context of the last Ice Age. Until about 5,000 BC Jersey was not an island but part of continental France.
    The little I know of Jersey I know from some quite good fiction set there, but even from that I know the surnames are virtually all French. They had a bad time of it during the war.

    Seems a pity the everyday use of their French dialect has so declined.

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    Yes, both Jerrais and Jersey English (a dialect of English) are sadly in decline. My great-grandfather would have grown up with both in the 19th century. His mother was born in the Breton speaking region of France, his father was from the Gallo speaking region (another French dialect), and those two languages have also declined.

    My great-grandfather travelled widely as a sailor before he settled in New Zealand. He claimed to be fluent in five languages. He tended to be boastful, but given his background I'm inclined to believe him.

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