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Thread: Can Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian speakers understand classically pronounced Latin

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    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    Can Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian speakers understand classically pronounced Latin

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    I think the results would be different, ie. they'd have an easier time if he spoke "Church" Latin, which is closer in time. Also, his strong American accent comes through even though he doesn't think it does.


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    I was able to understand a lot, but above all, based on what I know of other Latin languages. I do not know if a speaker of these Neo-Latin languages ​​who does not know another language, could understand enough. Although the video is very interesting to me because I have never heard someone speaking classical Latin so fluently, I would like to hear someone speaking vulgar Latin ... I think it would be more understandable ...

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    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    I think Ecclesiastical Latin, which is just a later version of Latin, i.e. from later centuries, is much easier for modern Roman speakers to understand, especially Italian speakers.


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    I really liked the video. I had the same feeling that Italo had. From the explanations of the Italian girl, the Mexican boy and also, of course, the Brazilian boy, I could understand the meaning, in Latin, of most of the words. Obviously I understood everything that the three youth spoke in their native languages, much more than I understood Latin. I don't know if a person who doesn't speak a Romance language would have the same facility. Modern Romance languages ​​are derived from vulgar Latin and not from classical Latin, as Italouruguaian stressed.

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    Regular Member italouruguayan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I think Ecclesiastical Latin, which is just a later version of Latin, i.e. from later centuries, is much easier for modern Roman speakers to understand, especially Italian speakers.



    This kind of Latin really sounds quite "Italian".
    Classical Latin pronunciation allows us to understand, for example, how the Latin word Caesar gave rise to the German word Kaiser ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by italouruguayan View Post
    This kind of Latin really sounds quite "Italian".
    Classical Latin pronunciation allows us to understand, for example, how the Latin word Caesar gave rise to the German word Kaiser ...
    It's very close to Italian, and much more understandable to an Italian ear. That's particularly true for standard Italian, but that's as much by design as by "closeness" to the "source".

    Standard Italian is a "created" language, crafted in part by Dante and numerous poets and writers since his time. They added a lot of "elevated" vocabulary to Tuscan the former of which they "borrowed" from ecclesiastical Latin. There are also some Provencal and Sicilian influences because in the Middle Ages those were also areas which produced high levels of poetry. Part of the design was also to create a beautiful "sounding" language. "Classical" Latin is quite ugly sounding in my opinion, but then Italian was my first language, so that influences me.

    I'm also partial to ecclesiastical Latin because that's what I learned in Catholic schools, but also because a lot of the classical music I love is sung in ecclesiastical Latin.
    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/89/d7/5a/8...ba41d6c907.jpg

    I'm not really a fan of Classical Roman literature, and certainly not of trying to read, much less properly pronounce "Caesar's Wars". :)

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    I aw this a few months ago was surprised at what I can understand. French though sound like gibberish

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