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Thread: Human population dynamics and Yersinia pestis in ancient northeast Asia

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    Human population dynamics and Yersinia pestis in ancient northeast Asia

    Human population dynamics and Yersinia pestis in ancient northeast Asia
    Gülşah Merve Kılınç, Natalija Kashuba, Dilek Koptekin, Nora Bergfeldt, Handan Melike Dönertaş, Ricardo Rodríguez-Varela, Dmitrij Shergin, Grigorij Ivanov, Dmitrii Kichigin, Kjunnej Pestereva, Denis Volkov, Pavel Mandryka, Artur Kharinskii, Alexey Tishkin, Evgenij Ineshin, Evgeniy Kovychev, Aleksandr Stepanov, Love Dalén, Torsten Günther, Emrah Kırdök, Mattias Jakobsson, Mehmet Somel, Maja Krzewińska, Jan Storå, and Anders Götherström1,6,*
    Abstract
    We present genome-wide data from 40 individuals dating to c.16,900 to 550 years ago in northeast Asia. We describe hitherto unknown gene flow and admixture events in the region, revealing a complex population history. While populations east of Lake Baikal remained relatively stable from the Mesolithic to the Bronze Age, those from Yakutia and west of Lake Baikal witnessed major population transformations, from the Late Upper Paleolithic to the Neolithic, and during the Bronze Age, respectively. We further locate the Asian ancestors of Paleo-Inuits, using direct genetic evidence. Last, we report the most northeastern ancient occurrence of the plague-related bacterium, Yersinia pestis. Our findings indicate the highly connected and dynamic nature of northeast Asia populations throughout the Holocene.


    Source:

    https://advances.sciencemag.org/cont...b-figures-data
    Sefhardi, aschenazi, bulgarian
    die Überlebenden
    https://www.yfull.com/live/tree/E-Y62418/
    https://yfull.com/mtree/H3ap/
    k12b ancient
    Closest:
    3.30708331
    R136_Imperial_Era_Marcellino_&_Pietrophenotype: east med with pontic vibe

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    Y haplogroups
    All individuals were accredited either to Y macro-haplogroup Q or N. The one possible exception was individual irk032 (probable carrier of Hg I*), which was dated to the Medieval period. In short, all of the oldest (Mesolithic and Neolithic) and most eastern (Trans-Baikal and Yakutia) individuals were carriers of N1c1a1 lineage, while Bronze Age males from Cis-Baikal region were all carriers of Q1a2a and its variants. The individual from Cis-Baikal region (irk007, Popovskij-1) may have been a carrier of N1c2b2 lineage associated with present-day Khanty and Komi populations of western Siberia (14). This pattern is in line with earlier findings suggesting both lineages were widespread among individuals from Neolithic Lokomotiv and Shamanka cultures around Lake Baikal (16) (Table S18).



    https://advances.sciencemag.org/cont...abc4587_SM.pdf
    Давайте вместе снова сделаем мир великий!

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    looks like same result from Damgaard paper a few years ago. However I want to know about past result of R1a in that region:

    "These serial changes in the Baikal populations are reflected in Y-chromosome lineages (Fig. SA; figs. S24 to S27, and tables S13 and SI4). MAI carries the R haplogroup, whereas the majority of Baikal_EN males belong to N lineages, which were widely distributed across Northern Eurasia (29), and the Baikal_LNBA males all carry Q haplogroups, as do most of the Okunevo_EMBA as well as some present-day Central Asians and Siberians."


    "Archi said...
    @Rob

    "Damgaard et al then reanalysed the samples and dated individuals . The R1a did not re-appear, because they weren’t legitimate results"

    This is a lie. Damgaard studied and dated only 2 samples out of previous 14 from this site, so your statement that they are not legitimate is a downright lie, Damgaard simply did not test them at all. He tested other samples of the Kitoi/Isakovo/Glazkovo cultures from other sites."

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    Are they blondies?

    According to the paper
    “We only find variation in AGT, KITLG, EDAR, ABCC1 and CYP3A5 genes. While the different variants and incidence of heterozygotes in AGT and KITLIG is spread out among various groups and time periods and likely represents population variation, it seems that the increase in hetergozygosity in ABCC1 and EDAR genes is mostly restricted to Neolithic and Bronze Age individuals from Cis-Baikal group. On EDAR we observed increased occurrence of (A) on otherwise widespread (G) variant associated with straight hair and shovel shaped incisors (note that the phenotypic representation of heterozygotes would be the same), while four individuals were heterozygous on ABCC1 gene, otherwise all tested individuals were homozygotes for variant T associated with Asian ancestry. Thus, it seems that on some phenotype encoding SNPs we detect signal of western admixture in Cis-Baikal during the Neolithic and Bronze Age.”


    - EHG R1a carried mt DNA C and lake bikal pottery, introducing supine burial of east eurasia to east europe for the first tiem:

    According to wiki
    The derived allele of the KITLG SNP rs12821256 is associated with, and likely causal for, blond hair in Europeans.[17] The earliest known individual with this allele is the Siberian ANE individual Afontova Gora 3, which is dated to 16130-15749 BCE.[9] This allele is also present in one hunter-gatherer each from Samara, Motala and Ukraine (I0124, I0014 and I1763), as well as several later individuals with Steppe ancestry. Since the allele is found in populations with EHG but not Western Hunter-Gatherer ancestry, it suggests that its origin is in the Ancient North Eurasian population.[citation needed]
    Geneticist David Reich said that the KITLG gene for blond hair entered continental Europe in a massive population migration from the Eurasian steppe, by a people who had Ancient North Eurasian ancestry

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    Quote Originally Posted by johen View Post
    Are they blondies?

    According to the paper
    “We only find variation in AGT, KITLG, EDAR, ABCC1 and CYP3A5 genes. While the different variants and incidence of heterozygotes in AGT and KITLIG is spread out among various groups and time periods and likely represents population variation, it seems that the increase in hetergozygosity in ABCC1 and EDAR genes is mostly restricted to Neolithic and Bronze Age individuals from Cis-Baikal group. On EDAR we observed increased occurrence of (A) on otherwise widespread (G) variant associated with straight hair and shovel shaped incisors (note that the phenotypic representation of heterozygotes would be the same), while four individuals were heterozygous on ABCC1 gene, otherwise all tested individuals were homozygotes for variant T associated with Asian ancestry. Thus, it seems that on some phenotype encoding SNPs we detect signal of western admixture in Cis-Baikal during the Neolithic and Bronze Age.”


    - EHG R1a carried mt DNA C and lake bikal pottery, introducing supine burial of east eurasia to east europe for the first tiem:

    According to wiki
    The derived allele of the KITLG SNP rs12821256 is associated with, and likely causal for, blond hair in Europeans.[17] The earliest known individual with this allele is the Siberian ANE individual Afontova Gora 3, which is dated to 16130-15749 BCE.[9] This allele is also present in one hunter-gatherer each from Samara, Motala and Ukraine (I0124, I0014 and I1763), as well as several later individuals with Steppe ancestry. Since the allele is found in populations with EHG but not Western Hunter-Gatherer ancestry, it suggests that its origin is in the Ancient North Eurasian population.[citation needed]
    Geneticist David Reich said that the KITLG gene for blond hair entered continental Europe in a massive population migration from the Eurasian steppe, by a people who had Ancient North Eurasian ancestry

    interesting
    so maybe the blond hair allelle was spread to west europe from
    east with the steppe ancestery
    is this snp is checked by ftdna chip i don't think so

    https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs12821256
    p.s
    i wonder if i carry this allele i mean at least one copy
    when i was younger i was light haired
    now my hair very dark brown close to black lol

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    I think they were civilization makers.

    According to the paper:
    “On the territory of the Baikal region (Angara, Upper Lena, Baikal, Vitim), the late Mesolithic burial complexes were identified - related to the Khinsky and Schukin burial traditions; Early Neolithic - the Chinese tradition of burials; Late Neolithic — Isakovskaya, Serovskaya, Late-Serovskaya for Priolkhonya, “burial traditions” for the Upper Lena “archaic”.

    See the ring, which is extremely important in their culture. The ring tradition continued to seima turbino, okunevo, karashuk, and even Avar.

    lake baikal:


    Hongshan civilization in Manchu area, the first neolithic civilization in east asia, where pyramid locates. Moreover in boundary of north korea and manchu, there are almost 10,000 small step pyramids now.

    [img]www.hongshanren.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/t3.22315358_std.jpg[/img]
    http://www.hongshanren.com/artifacts

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