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Thread: Vitamin D supplements protect against coronavirus

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    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
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    Post Vitamin D supplements protect against coronavirus

    As I mentioned at the beginning of the pandemic, one of the few supplements that work in warding off Covid is vitamin D. The Guardian just published an article mentioning several studies (in the UK, Spain and South Korea) that confirm that vitamin D deficiency is linked to a higher mortality rate. Among patients already infected, taking high doses of vitamin D significantly lowered the chances to be placed in intensive care or to die.

    I long suspected that the reason why some countries like Denmark, Norway, Iceland or Finland have a much lower death rate is that most of the population was already used to taking vitamin D supplements due to the low sunlight in northern latitudes.

    The death rate among Black people in the UK and the US is about 2.5 times higher than for White or East Asian people. Yet mortality appears to be relatively low in Africa itself. This can easily be explained by the fact that darker skin produces less vitamin D in higher latitudes. South Asian people in the UK have twice the death rate of Whites, not quite as much as people of African descent, but their skin tone is also intermediate.
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    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    How high is high, Maciamo?


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    Advisor Angela's Avatar
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    Somewhere in the article it says they were giving 700 times the recommended daily dose of 400 IU. That seems an impossible number, but they were people already severely ill.

    I also found this online.

    "Recommendations from the US Institute of Medicine suggest that an average daily intake of 400–800 IU, or 10–20 micrograms, is adequate for 97.5% of individuals (21Trusted Source, 22Trusted Source).
    However, some studies have shown that the daily intake needs to be higher than that if you aren’t being exposed to sun.
    Depending on who you ask, blood levels above 20 ng/ml or 30 ng/ml are considered as “sufficient.” One study of healthy adults showed that a daily intake of 1120–1680 IU was needed to maintain sufficient blood levels (23Trusted Source).
    In the same study, individuals who were vitamin D deficient needed 5000 IU to reach blood levels above 30 ng/ml.
    Studies in postmenopausal women with vitamin D levels below 20 ng/ml found that ingesting 800–2000 IU raised blood levels above 20 ng/ml. However, higher doses were needed to reach 30 ng/ml (24Trusted Source, 25Trusted Source).
    Overweight or obese individuals may also need higher amounts of vitamin D (26Trusted Source, 27Trusted Source).
    All things considered, a daily vitamin D intake of 1000–4000 IU, or 25–100 micrograms, should be enough to ensure optimal blood levels in most people.
    4000 IU is the safe upper limit according to the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Make sure not to take more than that without consulting with a health professional."

    Personally, I'm going with 4000 IU of Vitamin B3 per day, but I'm not a doctor and I'm not giving medical advice. It's just what I'm going to do, particularly based on the fact that twice in my life I had to be prescribed very high doses of Vitamin D because I was deficient. That's what you get when you don't go in the sun and are slightly lactose intolerant, given they put Vitamin D in milk.

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    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
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    Dosage really depends on a person's diet, sun exposure and how efficiently they absorb and store vitamin D in their body. Contrarily to vitamin C, which cannot be stocked in the body, vitamin D is stored in adipose (fat) tissues and therefore levels change relatively slowly over the course of months. Very thin people with low body fat may have trouble storing vitamin D, as it happened to me at one point before I got my weight back to normal.

    It's best to check one's vitamin D levels with a blood test at least once a year. Anything under 20 ng/mL is very insufficient. The minimum blood level is 20 ng/mL, but the ideal level should be between 40 and 60 ng/mL at any age.

    I once had my level under 20 after a bad bout of flu and had to take 50,000 IU (125x the official daily allowance, which is far too low anyway) for several months before I got back over 40 ng/mL.

    For anyone living in northern latitudes (northern Europe, Canada), or living elsewhere but not going to sun much, I would recommend taking at least 1000 IU to maintain a good level. More might be necessary in winter.

    Before finding the right dosage I would recommend testing one's blood levels every 3 or 4 months the first year to see how quickly it changes over time with a specific dosage, and adapt it accordingly.

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    All this posting about vitamin D makes me hungry; in winter time.
    Trying to balance electrolyte deficiency -and food with some vitamins.
    On the menu for today--
    Whole organic fortified D milk 3.8%. vitamin D and calcium/combination
    Salmon -potassium, sodium
    Bannana milkshake and a couple egg yolks.

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Silesian View Post
    All this posting about vitamin D makes me hungry; in winter time.
    Trying to balance electrolyte deficiency -and food with some vitamins.
    On the menu for today--
    Whole organic fortified D milk 3.8%. vitamin D and calcium/combination
    Salmon -potassium, sodium
    Bannana milkshake and a couple egg yolks.
    Healthy choices, but in winter especially I'd still take a supplement. Just my unsolicited advice. :)

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