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Thread: Italian vs Emilian

  1. #1
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    Italian vs Emilian

    I wonder if some of our Romance language speakers understand 1) the Italian without the translation into English 2) the Emilian. As far as I'm concerned, it's a separate language.

    I'm providing the English translation first. On the video you can hear the pronunciation of the Italian, which may make understanding harder, and then the Emilian.

    I should add this isn't the Emilian of my grandparents; it's of the lowlands. Their speech is described as "Mountain Languages". I have to say the Emilian of the lowlands is less understandable to a Tuscan speaker.

    Mi riposo I’m resting
    Tieni stretto=hold tight
    Faccio presto-I’ll hurry, do it fast
    C’e caldo-It’s hot
    Excomunitario-stranger, foreigner, not of our community
    Eh? Huh? What?
    Lo Conosci?-Do you know him?
    Mi fai ridere-You make me laugh
    Piscio-I’m urinating
    Usa la corda per farci un nodo-Use the rope to make the knot
    Sei fisicamente diformato-You’re physically deformed
    Metteti le scarpe-Put on your shoes
    Prendilo con te-Bring it with you
    Gli uccellini cantano-the birds are singing
    E ora di mangiare-It’s time to eat
    E insipido-It’s tasteless
    Andiamo nel bosco a raccogliere le more-Let’s go into the woods to gather the blackberries
    Aprilo-Open it
    Ti apro in due-I’ll split you open?
    Passami la grattugia-Pass me the grater
    Stronzo-well, literally like a piece of s***. I hate how often Italians use this
    Ci credo bene-I really believe it. (I believe it well.)
    E soffice-It’s soft
    E pieno di topi-It’s full of mice
    Mi stringono I pantaloni-My pants are too tight, but literally my pants squeeze me
    Io lavoro-I work
    Oggi c’e il sole-Today the sun is shining
    E marcio-It’s rotten
    Muffa-mold
    Ho sonno-I’m sleepy
    Corona-crown
    Abito in un bel borgo=I live in a beautiful village
    E bagnato-It’s wet
    Svolto a sinistra-I turned left
    Raccontami qualcosa di bello-Tell me something nice
    Si sentono I tuoni-I hear thunder (One hears thunder or Thunder can be heard)
    Non andarci attorno-Don’t go near them
    Ci sono degli zingari-There are gypsies
    In giardino ho un bel albero di melograni-In the garden I have a beautiful pomegranate tree
    Sporco che non sei altro-You’re so dirty (Imagine complete disgust! :))
    Vieni dentro=Come inside
    Stiamo facendo la torta=We’re making pie
    Ne vuoi un pezzo? Do you want a piece?




    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

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    The ear must get used to the speed and the accent in the sentences. It gets easier every time you listen to it.
    At first, I only understood a few words, ... the more I listen to it, the more I can identify the words, but not all, and I wouldn’t know the meaning of some of the words without translation :)

    More than half of the sentences are too different from Italian to be understood, ... especially by Central and Southern Italians for sure.

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    The standard Italian, I understood well. As for Emilian, I didn't understand anything.

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    As Salento implied, if you really know Italian well and you just listen to Emilian words and phrases a few times you can pick out some of it, but I think even for most Northern Italians it's less intelligible than the language of the Veneto.

    The only reason I can understand a lot of it is because I sometimes heard my nonni speak in a version of it, and I visited my Emilian relatives quite often. Also, our local dialect has a lot of Emilian influence. As for speaking it? Not a chance. :)

    As I said, I think Emilian is as much a separate language as Venetian or Sicilian. Indeed, it may be more unintelligible to most Italians than the latter two. Genovese or Zenese is still "King" of mutual unintelligibility perhaps.

    Btw, I didn't agree with one of the Italian translations. A tal degh doesn't really mean Ci credo, or I believe it. It sort of means "I told you so", or "I'm telling you", i.e. it's the truth. From Ti dico?

    I'm not sure of the etymology of "i bregh" for pants; perhaps from a similar root to "breeches"? A Prest for presto is used in our local dialect, as is "a ghe" for there is.

    Zenese...I understand at the most about 40-50% of it without help.


    Lunigianese...well, Pontremolese from the northern part of the territory. I think it should be very intelligible to Italian speakers and a lot of it even to Romance speakers in general.


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    Educating the ears, Angela, as you and Salento stressed, is very important. That's what happens when I'm listening to Portuguese from Portugal. It is just a matter of getting your ears used to the Europeans' way of pronouncing, since the words are identical. Brazilians are more used to hearing Spanish from our Latin American neighbors and, in this sense, initially, they find European Portuguese very difficult to understand. But, effectively, the vocabulary, grammar and spelling are practically identical and it is only a matter of the Brazilian to listen more carefully and more frequently to European Portuguese. While television productions in Brazil are widely shown in Portugal, the opposite is not true. Virtually none of what is produced in terms of culture in Portugal is shown in Brazil. The Brazilian has a habit of listening and trying to communicate in Spanish, speaking what is popularly called portunhol, and no habit of listening to European Portuguese. Currently, cultural exchange between the two countries is minimal and Brazilians who like to venture into the brother country, including to attend their colleges, are not the most economically-favored.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Educating the ears, Angela, as you and Salento stressed, is very important. That's what happens when I'm listening to Portuguese from Portugal. It is just a matter of getting your ears used to the Europeans' way of pronouncing, since the words are identical. Brazilians are more used to hearing Spanish from our Latin American neighbors and, in this sense, initially, they find European Portuguese very difficult to understand. But, effectively, the vocabulary, grammar and spelling are practically identical and it is only a matter of the Brazilian to listen more carefully and more frequently to European Portuguese. While television productions in Brazil are widely shown in Portugal, the opposite is not true. Virtually none of what is produced in terms of culture in Portugal is shown in Brazil. The Brazilian has a habit of listening and trying to communicate in Spanish, speaking what is popularly called portunhol, and no habit of listening to European Portuguese. Currently, cultural exchange between the two countries is minimal and Brazilians who like to venture into the brother country, including to attend their colleges, are not the most economically-favored.
    I'm surprised by that. Why wouldn't Portugal try to sell it's programming to Brazil? I know that some Brazilians go to settle in Brazil, because I see that some of the Portuguese immigrants to the U.S. sometimes have Brazilian ancestry. Does it go the other way? Do Portuguese people still come to settle in Brazil?

    The language situation with, say, Emilian and Italian is different in some ways from what you describe. Some of the vocabulary is actually different, which makes it more difficult for mutual intelligibility, i.e. bregh for trousers or pants (pantaloni).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    I'm surprised by that. Why wouldn't Portugal try to sell it's programming to Brazil? I know that some Brazilians go to settle in Brazil, because I see that some of the Portuguese immigrants to the U.S. sometimes have Brazilian ancestry. Does it go the other way? Do Portuguese people still come to settle in Brazil?

    The language situation with, say, Emilian and Italian is different in some ways from what you describe. Some of the vocabulary is actually different, which makes it more difficult for mutual intelligibility, i.e. bregh for trousers or pants (pantaloni).
    Many Portuguese accuse Brazilians of isolationism, in the sense that they like to consume only what is produced in their own country. This is particularly true in music. In the last 10 or 15 years, the migratory flow between the two countries has been reversed. More Brazilians go to Portugal than the other way around. However, if this number of Brazilians arriving in Portugal for us is absolutely insignificant, for Portugal, a country that has only about 10,000,000 inhabitants, that number is significant. In the universities of Porto, especially, Brazilians have been victims of xenophobia and racism, including refer to Brazilian women as merchandise.

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    Emiliano is really a different language. If not for the subtitles, I would not have understood anything. Even Romanian is more understandable to me. That said, some words from Emiliano caught my attention with a certain resemblance to Spanish words.
    Corda = Souga = Soga.
    Chiudelo = Serrel = Cièrralo.
    Pantaloni = Bregh = Bragas (panties or sometimes pants).
    È bagnato = L'e moj = està mojado

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    Emilian is very different than Romagnol ......in which they are in the same region of Emilia-Romagnol

    https://linguisticator.com/blog/1991...poken-in-italy
    Fathers mtdna ...... T2b17
    Grandfather mtdna ... T1a1e
    Sons mtdna ...... K1a4p
    Mothers line ..... R1b-S8172
    Grandmother paternal side ... I1-CTS6397
    Wife paternal line ..... R1a-Z282

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    Quote Originally Posted by italouruguayan View Post
    Emiliano is really a different language. If not for the subtitles, I would not have understood anything. Even Romanian is more understandable to me. That said, some words from Emiliano caught my attention with a certain resemblance to Spanish words.
    Corda = Souga = Soga.
    Chiudelo = Serrel = Cièrralo.
    Pantaloni = Bregh = Bragas (panties or sometimes pants).
    È bagnato = L'e moj = està mojado
    That's a very astute observation and what I was hoping I would get as feedback. :)

    One way of dividing the Romance languages is splitting them into "Western Romance" and "Eastern Romance". Tuscan is part of the Eastern Romance group, and therefore so is standard Italian. All the languages or dialects north of Toscana are "Western Romance" languages, and I was wondering if some of the words in Emilian or Zenese etc. are by origin from "Western Romance" sources.


    If anyone sees anymore, please let me know. I'm just very curious about the origin of some of the words completely unrelated to the Tuscan or standard Italian word.

    I was raised in the border area just north of the La Spezia/Rimini line so my accent I think sounds both a bit Tuscan and a bit Emilian. I certainly don't have the, to me, ugly "gorgia" where Florentines change some "C" sounds to "H" sounds.:)
    Last edited by Angela; 11-03-21 at 00:33.

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    The lombard language in the link in post #9 is the same as Verona ............she is from Cremona which is East Lombardy , under the venetian republic for 300 years plus

    same as Istriot ( Istria ) below ...........similar to coastal Venetian of Jesolo and Caorle areas

    https://omniglot.com/writing/istriot.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hea View Post
    It is interesting that in Romanian, at first sight, although I do not know the Italian language, I can partially or fully understand most of the words and sentences exemplified in both language variants.
    It makes complete sense to me that you can understand Italian. I had occasion once to work with a Romanian colleague for quite a while. After listening for a few days I started to get a rough understanding of what she was saying in Romanian.

    I'm a bit surprised you can understand the Emiliano, as the intrusive words in Romanian would be Slavic in origin, and our intrusive words would be Gallic in origin. You must have an astute ear. :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    That's a very astute observation and what I was hoping I would get as feedback. :)

    One way of dividing the Romance languages is splitting them into "Western Romance" and "Eastern Romance". Tuscan is part of the Eastern Romance group, and therefore so is standard Italian. All the languages or dialects north of Toscana are "Western Romance" languages, and I was wondering if some of the words in Emilian or Zenese etc. are by origin from "Western Romance" sources.


    If anyone sees anymore, please let me know. I'm just very curious about the origin of some of the words completely unrelated to the Tuscan or standard Italian word.

    I was raised in the border area just north of the La Spezia/Rimini line so my accent I think sounds both a bit Tuscan and a bit Emilian. I certainly don't have the, to me, ugly "gorgia" where Florentines change some "C" sounds to "H" sounds.:)

    Thanks Angela!
    Other things that I have noticed, are some similarities with Veneto: the use of the particle "dre", similar to "drio" in Veneto, equivalent to the ending "ndo" (like "cantando"), the word "inco" ( as "Uncuò-Uncò = Today" in Veneto). The word "braghese" = pants is also used in Veneto. This word, which is also equivalent to the Spanish "bragas", comes from the Latin "braccae", and in turn, derives from the word that the Gauls used to denominate their pants.

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    Quote Originally Posted by italouruguayan View Post
    Thanks Angela!
    Other things that I have noticed, are some similarities with Veneto: the use of the particle "dre", similar to "drio" in Veneto, equivalent to the ending "ndo" (like "cantando"), the word "inco" ( as "Uncuò-Uncò = Today" in Veneto). The word "braghese" = pants is also used in Veneto. This word, which is also equivalent to the Spanish "bragas", comes from the Latin "braccae", and in turn, derives from the word that the Gauls used to denominate their pants.
    Drio in veneto has the following meanings, depends on what you use it for

    -behind, after, rear

    -along

    -doing


    Brage or Pantalon ............say thing



    https://www.amazon.com/Venetian-Engl.../dp/1425987907

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    Quote Originally Posted by torzio View Post
    Drio in veneto has the following meanings, depends on what you use it for

    -behind, after, rear

    -along

    -doing


    Brage or Pantalon ............say thing


    https://www.amazon.com/Venetian-Engl.../dp/1425987907

    Thanks Torzio!
    It is good to have the contributions of someone who knows the Veneto language ... I tried to make a contribution from my limited knowledge of my nonno's mother tongue (what a shame!) :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hea View Post
    I made a list of words and sentences that I think have a certain degree of similarity with those in Romanian, which have the same meaning as those in Italian and Emilian. Here are 39 of the 43 in the movie:

    - Mi riposo - Am arpouns - Am repaos. or Mă repauzez.
    - Tieni stretto - tin strech - Ține strâns.
    - Faccio presto - A fagh prest - O fac presat de timp.
    - C’e caldo - A ghe cheld - Ce cald e.
    - Excomunitario - Extracomuniter - Extracomunitar
    - Eh? - Ah? - Ha?
    - Lo Conosci? - Tal cgnosset? - Îl cunoști?
    - Mi fai ridere - At'm fe reder - Mă faci a râde.
    - Piscio - A pess - piș
    - Usa la corda per farci un nodo - Drova la souga per feregh al groapp - Folosește coarda (or șnurul) pentru a face un nod.
    - Emiliano - Emiliân - Emilian
    - Sei fisicamente diformato - T'ė taie col rouns - Esti deformat fizic.
    - Prendilo con te - Tol tegh - Prinde-l cu tine.
    - E ora di mangiare - L'e oura ed magner - E ora de mâncat.
    - E insipido - L'e tseved - E insipid. E sarbed. /searbăd/sărbăt
    - Andiamo nel bosco a raccogliere le more - Andomm in tal bosch a tor so al mour - Aidem in boscheți să culegem mure.
    - Chiudilo - Strecchel - Închide-l - The word Streche exists in Romanian but refers to a state of extreme agitation of some animals that appears after the bite of some insects.
    - Ti apro in due - A te sbregh - Te crăp in doua. Te sparg. (?)
    - Passami la grattugia - Pasem la razoura - Pasează-mi Răzătoarea.
    - Stronzo - Strouns - , stranță, ștroamfă, zdroanță, zdreanță.
    - Ci credo bene - A tal degh - Cred bine.
    - Mi stringono I pantaloni - I me bregh i strechen - Mă strâng pantalonii. (again "streche" :))
    - Io lavoro - Me a lavour - In Romanian there are the nouns labor and laboare which means hard, exhausting work.
    - Oggi c’e il sole - Inco a ghe al soul - Azi e soare
    - Muffa - Moafa - mușiță, mucoare, mucegai
    - Ho sonno - A gho soann - Mi-e somn/soamne.
    - Roma - Roama. A vagh a Roama (vado a Roama) - Am vad spre Roma.
    - Corona - Curouna - coroană, coronă, corună
    - E bagnato - L'e moj - "L'e moj" is similar to "Le moi" which means in Romanian, wet, soaked, moisten them or put something in the water.
    - Svolto a sinistra - A voult a sinestra - Voltă la stânga
    - Raccontami qualcosa di bello - Countem quell ed boun - Contăm pe ceva bun.
    - Si sentono I tuoni - Is senten i troun - Se simte tunit/tunet
    - Non andarci attorno - Anderegh mia atouren ân - Îndărăt, întoarnă -te. (both romanian words are a call for someone to not continue his path and returns back to the place he had left)
    - Ci sono degli zingari - A ghe i sengher - Sunt țigani.
    - In giardino ho un bel albero di melograni - In giardein a gho un bel elber ed pommegraner - În grădină am un frumos arbore de rodiu.
    - Sporco che non sei altro - Sacloun ca't ne eter - Spurcat ca nimeni alt. or Spurcat cum nu e altul.
    - Vieni dentro - Vin deinter - Vin de intră.
    - Stiamo facendo la torta - A somme dre a fer la tourta - Stăm și facem turta. or Știm să facem turta/tort.
    - Ne vuoi un pezzo? - A n'in vot un pcoun? Nu vrei un pic? or Nu ai vrut un picuț?
    Very interesting! In a good number of cases Romanian seems to be closer to Italian (Tuscan), and in other cases it's closer to Emilian!

    Between the two, no wonder after a few days my "ear" adjusted and I was able to understand quite a bit. :)

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    Is Genovese maybe more intelligible to Italian and Romance speakers than Emilian?



    The English translation:
    Umbre de muri muri de mainé
    dunde ne vegnì duve l'è ch'ané
    da 'n scitu duve a l'ûn-a a se mustra nûa
    e a neutte a n'à puntou u cutellu ä gua
    e a muntä l'àse gh'é restou Diu
    u Diàu l'é in çë e u s'è gh'è faetu u nìu
    ne sciurtìmmu da u mä pe sciugà e osse da u Dria
    e a funtan-a di cumbi 'nta cä de pria
    E 'nt'a cä de pria chi ghe saià
    int'à cä du Dria che u nu l'è mainà
    gente de Lûgan facce da mandillä
    qui che du luassu preferiscian l'ä
    figge de famiggia udù de bun
    che ti peu ammiàle senza u gundun
    E a 'ste panse veue cose ghe daià
    cose da beive, cose da mangiä
    frittûa de pigneu giancu de Purtufin
    çervelle de bae 'nt'u meximu vin
    lasagne da fiddià ai quattru tucchi
    paciûgu in aegruduse de lévre de cuppi
    E 'nt'a barca du vin ghe naveghiemu 'nsc'i scheuggi
    emigranti du rìe cu'i cioi 'nt'i euggi
    finché u matin crescià da puéilu rechéugge
    frè di ganeuffeni e dè figge
    bacan d'a corda marsa d'aegua e de sä
    che a ne liga e a ne porta 'nte 'na creuza de mä.

    Shadows of faces faces of sailors
    where you come from where are you going
    from a place where the moon is shown naked
    and the night pointed the knife at our throat
    and to mount the donkey is still God
    The Devil is in heaven and there he built the nest
    we leave the sea to dry Andrea's bones
    the fountain of the doves in the stone house.
    And in the stone house guests will be
    in Andrea's house that is not Sailor
    people of Lugano faces pickpocket
    those who prefer the wing of the bass
    girls of the family, the smell of good
    you can watch them without a condom.
    And what will give to these empty bellies
    what to drink, what to eat
    fried fish, white Portofino
    lamb brains in the same wine
    lasagne to be cut to four sauces
    pasticcio of sweet and sour rabbit with tiles.
    And we will sail in the boat of wine on the rocks
    emigrants of laughter with nails in our eyes
    until the morning will grow that you can collect
    brother of carnations and of girls
    Lord of the rope running water and salt
    that binds us and brings us into a creuza de mä *.
    * The "Creuza de mä" is in Genoese dialect a suburban street that runs between two walls that usually determine the property boundaries






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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Is Genovese maybe more intelligible to Italian and Romance speakers than Emilian?



    The English translation:
    Umbre de muri muri de mainé
    dunde ne vegnì duve l'è ch'ané
    da 'n scitu duve a l'ûn-a a se mustra nûa
    e a neutte a n'à puntou u cutellu ä gua
    e a muntä l'àse gh'é restou Diu
    u Diàu l'é in çë e u s'è gh'è faetu u nìu
    ne sciurtìmmu da u mä pe sciugà e osse da u Dria
    e a funtan-a di cumbi 'nta cä de pria
    E 'nt'a cä de pria chi ghe saià
    int'à cä du Dria che u nu l'è mainà
    gente de Lûgan facce da mandillä
    qui che du luassu preferiscian l'ä
    figge de famiggia udù de bun
    che ti peu ammiàle senza u gundun
    E a 'ste panse veue cose ghe daià
    cose da beive, cose da mangiä
    frittûa de pigneu giancu de Purtufin
    çervelle de bae 'nt'u meximu vin
    lasagne da fiddià ai quattru tucchi
    paciûgu in aegruduse de lévre de cuppi
    E 'nt'a barca du vin ghe naveghiemu 'nsc'i scheuggi
    emigranti du rìe cu'i cioi 'nt'i euggi
    finché u matin crescià da puéilu rechéugge
    frè di ganeuffeni e dè figge
    bacan d'a corda marsa d'aegua e de sä
    che a ne liga e a ne porta 'nte 'na creuza de mä.

    Shadows of faces faces of sailors
    where you come from where are you going
    from a place where the moon is shown naked
    and the night pointed the knife at our throat
    and to mount the donkey is still God
    The Devil is in heaven and there he built the nest
    we leave the sea to dry Andrea's bones
    the fountain of the doves in the stone house.
    And in the stone house guests will be
    in Andrea's house that is not Sailor
    people of Lugano faces pickpocket
    those who prefer the wing of the bass
    girls of the family, the smell of good
    you can watch them without a condom.
    And what will give to these empty bellies
    what to drink, what to eat
    fried fish, white Portofino
    lamb brains in the same wine
    lasagne to be cut to four sauces
    pasticcio of sweet and sour rabbit with tiles.
    And we will sail in the boat of wine on the rocks
    emigrants of laughter with nails in our eyes
    until the morning will grow that you can collect
    brother of carnations and of girls
    Lord of the rope running water and salt
    that binds us and brings us into a creuza de mä *.
    * The "Creuza de mä" is in Genoese dialect a suburban street that runs between two walls that usually determine the property boundaries
    ... to me they’re both difficult to grasp,
    ... and though I’m familiar with the song, if i close my eyes, besides a few sentences, I still can’t understand most of it :)

  19. #19
    Regular Member italouruguayan's Avatar
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Is Genovese maybe more intelligible to Italian and Romance speakers than Emilian?



    The English translation:
    Umbre de muri muri de mainé
    dunde ne vegnì duve l'è ch'ané
    da 'n scitu duve a l'ûn-a a se mustra nûa
    e a neutte a n'à puntou u cutellu ä gua
    e a muntä l'àse gh'é restou Diu
    u Diàu l'é in çë e u s'è gh'è faetu u nìu
    ne sciurtìmmu da u mä pe sciugà e osse da u Dria
    e a funtan-a di cumbi 'nta cä de pria
    E 'nt'a cä de pria chi ghe saià
    int'à cä du Dria che u nu l'è mainà
    gente de Lûgan facce da mandillä
    qui che du luassu preferiscian l'ä
    figge de famiggia udù de bun
    che ti peu ammiàle senza u gundun
    E a 'ste panse veue cose ghe daià
    cose da beive, cose da mangiä
    frittûa de pigneu giancu de Purtufin
    çervelle de bae 'nt'u meximu vin
    lasagne da fiddià ai quattru tucchi
    paciûgu in aegruduse de lévre de cuppi
    E 'nt'a barca du vin ghe naveghiemu 'nsc'i scheuggi
    emigranti du rìe cu'i cioi 'nt'i euggi
    finché u matin crescià da puéilu rechéugge
    frè di ganeuffeni e dè figge
    bacan d'a corda marsa d'aegua e de sä
    che a ne liga e a ne porta 'nte 'na creuza de mä.

    Shadows of faces faces of sailors
    where you come from where are you going
    from a place where the moon is shown naked
    and the night pointed the knife at our throat
    and to mount the donkey is still God
    The Devil is in heaven and there he built the nest
    we leave the sea to dry Andrea's bones
    the fountain of the doves in the stone house.
    And in the stone house guests will be
    in Andrea's house that is not Sailor
    people of Lugano faces pickpocket
    those who prefer the wing of the bass
    girls of the family, the smell of good
    you can watch them without a condom.
    And what will give to these empty bellies
    what to drink, what to eat
    fried fish, white Portofino
    lamb brains in the same wine
    lasagne to be cut to four sauces
    pasticcio of sweet and sour rabbit with tiles.
    And we will sail in the boat of wine on the rocks
    emigrants of laughter with nails in our eyes
    until the morning will grow that you can collect
    brother of carnations and of girls
    Lord of the rope running water and salt
    that binds us and brings us into a creuza de mä *.
    * The "Creuza de mä" is in Genoese dialect a suburban street that runs between two walls that usually determine the property boundaries




    Unfortunately, in my country the visualization of this video is not authorized due to copyright.
    From what I can read, I understand single words and parts of sentences. I can understand more than in Emiliano ... but I also find it difficult ...

  20. #20
    Regular Member
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    16-07-21
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    Country: Canada



    The standard Italian, I understood well. As for Emilian, I didn't understand anything.
    Unfortunately, I am same

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