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Thread: Etruscan royal tombs in Albacete (Spain)?

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    Etruscan royal tombs in Albacete (Spain)?

    www dot abc dot es/cultura/abci-tumbas-reales-etruscas-albacete-202104071920_noticia.html (in Spanish, sorry)

    Etruscan tombs, or those of clear Etruscan influence, of relevant personalities who lived between the 7th and 2nd centuries BC.

    There are very significant similarities between the Etruscan tomb of ‘Arybballos suspso’ in Tarquinia (Italy) and rooms I and III of Alborajico (Spain)

    We know that the Etruscans had a very good relationship with the Phoenicians-Carthaginians …

    If confirmed, we would be facing "the first constructions of this people (Etruscan) that are preserved intact on our country."
    Last edited by celtiberian-II; 09-04-21 at 21:20.

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    Where do you read that they were "royal" tombs? All I can see is that some archaeologists have discovered evidence that some Etruscan burials may be present at that site, or, as the article says, perhaps burials influenced by the Etruscans.

    It wouldn't be a surprise given they were such great traders.

    It's true that large Etruscan emporia have rarely been found, other than the one recently excavated on Corsica, but there are some signs of them on the French Mediterranean coast, including at Marseilles, so it wouldn't be unusual for some sign of their trading activities to show up along the Spanish coast as well.

    See:
    https://www.world-archaeology.com/is...expected-tomb/

    I do find it interesting that when the "story" was that they were Anatolians, being associated with Etruscans was something to be disparaged, but now that it turns out that they were, like the Latins, instead from Central Europe, everyone wants to claim them. It's all so predictable. :)


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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Where do you read that they were "royal" tombs? All I can see is that some archaeologists have discovered evidence that some Etruscan burials may be present at that site, or, as the article says, perhaps burials influenced by the Etruscans.

    It wouldn't be a surprise given they were such great traders.

    It's true that large Etruscan emporia have rarely been found, other than the one recently excavated on Corsica, but there are some signs of them on the French Mediterranean coast, including at Marseilles, so it wouldn't be unusual for some sign of their trading activities to show up along the Spanish coast as well.

    See:

    ...

    I do find it interesting that when the "story" was that they were Anatolians, being associated with Etruscans was something to be disparaged, but now that it turns out that they were, like the Latins, instead from Central Europe, everyone wants to claim them. It's all so predictable. :)
    The title of the article is "¿Tumbas reales estruscas en Albacete?", in Spanish.

    As you know, Anatolians were neolithic people with a high influence in Europe, Central and Mediterranean. In fact, there were two flows entering Europe, one following the Danube and other seafaring. The Anatolians were the first masters of the Mare Nostrum, from East to West. They had a profound knowledge on agriculture, navigation, building and construction, astronomy, pottery ... These people contributed to the gene and cultural flow from the Mediterranean to the British Isles in 4000 BC. In summary, I agree with you that Anatolians shouldn't be disparaged. As I said you in other comment, I am not an expert and can't have an opinion about the Etruscan influence in Iberia. My only intention is to present a published article and wait the opinion of the experts in this forum.

    Kind regards.

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