Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Getting Neanderthal dna from cave dirt

  1. #1
    Advisor Angela's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-01-11
    Posts
    19,261


    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: USA - New York



    Getting Neanderthal dna from cave dirt

    Would it be possible to get it from cremation ashes I wonder? Think of all the European ancient dna we could get for crucial periods.

    See:
    https://science.sciencemag.org/conte...cience.abf1667

    "Abstract

    Bones and teeth are important sources of Pleistocene hominin DNA, but are rarely recovered at archaeological sites. Mitochondrial DNA has been retrieved from cave sediments, but provides limited value for studying population relationships. We therefore developed methods for the enrichment and analysis of nuclear DNA from sediments, and applied them to cave deposits in western Europe and southern Siberia dated to between approximately 200,000 and 50,000 years ago. We detect a population replacement in northern Spain approximately 100,000 years ago, accompanied by a turnover of mitochondrial DNA. We also identify two radiation events in Neanderthal history during the early part of the Late Pleistocene. Our work lays the ground for studying the population history of ancient hominins from trace amounts of nuclear DNA in sediments."


    Non si fa il proprio dovere perchè qualcuno ci dica grazie, lo si fa per principio, per se stessi, per la propria dignità. Oriana Fallaci

  2. #2
    Regular Member real expert's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-09-16
    Posts
    221


    Country: Germany



    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Would it be possible to get it from cremation ashes I wonder? Think of all the European ancient dna we could get for crucial periods.

    See:
    https://science.sciencemag.org/conte...cience.abf1667

    "Abstract

    Bones and teeth are important sources of Pleistocene hominin DNA, but are rarely recovered at archaeological sites. Mitochondrial DNA has been retrieved from cave sediments, but provides limited value for studying population relationships. We therefore developed methods for the enrichment and analysis of nuclear DNA from sediments, and applied them to cave deposits in western Europe and southern Siberia dated to between approximately 200,000 and 50,000 years ago. We detect a population replacement in northern Spain approximately 100,000 years ago, accompanied by a turnover of mitochondrial DNA. We also identify two radiation events in Neanderthal history during the early part of the Late Pleistocene. Our work lays the ground for studying the population history of ancient hominins from trace amounts of nuclear DNA in sediments."
    Do you have an idea, what the authors mean with "population replacement in northern Spain approximately 100,000 years ago"? The thing is, that 100 k ago, Homo sapiens didn't arrive in Europe yet.
    Last edited by real expert; 18-04-21 at 18:17.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    10-05-19
    Posts
    887

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    I2-M223
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H2A3

    Ethnic group
    Italian-Siicly-South
    Country: United States



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Real Expert: I read through a summary of the paper on Prof. Vernot's twitter post and he indicated the earlier Neanderthals were more similar to Altai and then over time the Neanderthals there became more similar to what is often referred to the as the More "Classic Neanderthals".

  4. #4
    Regular Member real expert's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-09-16
    Posts
    221


    Country: Germany



    Quote Originally Posted by Palermo Trapani View Post
    Real Expert: I read through a summary of the paper on Prof. Vernot's twitter post and he indicated the earlier Neanderthals were more similar to Altai and then over time the Neanderthals there became more similar to what is often referred to the as the More "Classic Neanderthals".
    Thanks for your reply.

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    10-05-19
    Posts
    887

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    I2-M223
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H2A3

    Ethnic group
    Italian-Siicly-South
    Country: United States



    Quote Originally Posted by real expert View Post
    Thanks for your reply.
    You're welcome.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    12-11-19
    Posts
    88


    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    Quote Originally Posted by real expert View Post
    Do you have an idea, what the authors mean with "population replacement in northern Spain approximately 100,000 years ago"? The thing is, that 100 k ago, Homo sapiens didn't arrive in Europe yet.
    Schöningen 300.000 years ago?
    Sima de los Huesos 400.000 years ago was not Neanderthal yet, but pretty close.

    Neandertahl findings older than 130.000 years are very rare, but afaik oldest Neanderthal findings are in Europe.

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    25-04-21
    Posts
    27


    Country: Croatia



    Aren't we all europeans 4% neanderthals? lol

  8. #8
    Regular Member Duarte's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-01-19
    Location
    Belo Horizonte
    Posts
    1,950

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-DF27-FGC35133

    Ethnic group
    Portuguese-Brazilian
    Country: Brazil



    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Regular Member Salento's Avatar
    Join Date
    30-05-17
    Posts
    4,769

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    T1a2 - SK1480
    MtDNA haplogroup
    H12a

    Ethnic group
    Italian
    Country: United States



    3 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Duarte View Post
    Remains of nine Neanderthals found in cave south of Rome

    ... Italian archaeologists have unearthed the bones of nine Neanderthals who were allegedly hunted and mauled by hyenas in their den about 100km south-east of Rome.

    Scientists from the Archaeological Superintendency of Latina and the University of Tor Vergata in Rome said the remains belong to seven adult males and one female, while another are those of a young boy.
    Experts believe the individuals lived in different time periods. Some bones could be as old as 50,000 to 68,000 years, whereas the most ancient remains are believed to be 100,000 years old.

    The Neanderthal remains, which include skullcaps and broken jawbones, were found in the Guattari cave, which had already gained notoriety for the presence of fossils of these distant human cousins, which were found by chance in 1939. Since then, no further human remains had been uncovered in Guattari...

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/...-south-of-rome

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •