Eupedia Forums
Site NavigationEupedia Top > Eupedia Forum & Japan Forum
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Ancient genomes from the initial Jomon period: new insights into the genetic history

  1. #1
    Regular Member kingjohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-09-16
    Posts
    1,048

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    rare E-FGC7391
    MtDNA haplogroup
    h3ap

    Country: Uruguay



    3 members found this post helpful.

    Ancient genomes from the initial Jomon period: new insights into the genetic history

    Abstract
    Starting 16000 years ago, the Neolithic lifestyle known as the Jomon culture spread across the Japanese archipelago. Although extensively studied by archaeology and physical anthropology, little is known about the genetic characteristics of the Jomon people. Here, we report the entire mitogenome and partial nuclear genome of skeletal remains from the initial Jomon period that were excavated from the Higashimyo shell midden site at Saga City, Kyushu Island, Japan. This is the first genome analysis of the initial Jomon people of Kyushu Island. These results provide important data for understanding the temporal transition and regional differences of the Jomon people. The mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome haplogroups were similar to those found in the previously reported later Jomon people. Moreover, comparison of three nuclear genomes from the initial to final Jomon periods indicated genetic continuity throughout the Jomon period within the Japanese archipelago with no significant evidence of admixture. This indicates that the genetic differentiation found among the Jomon people was promoted by the progression of regionalization throughout the Jomon period. Further accumulation of high-quality Jomon genome data spanning a wide range of regions and ages will clarify both intimate regional and temporal differences of the Jomon people and details of their admixture history with rice farmers, as suggested by Jomon mitochondrial genome data. The results obtained from this study provide important information for further analysis.


    source:
    https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article..._html/-char/en


    from the paper:
    Because the ruins were conserved without undergoing disturbance, it is possible to infer additional information about the life of the Jomon people. According to 14C dating, the ruins were formed c. 7460–7980 years ago (Saga City Board of Education, 2016); this corresponds to the initial Jomon period. This site is the oldest and largest wetland shell midden in Japan, and skeletal remains excavated there are among the oldest Jomon human remains from Kyushu Island.


    The depth of coverage of the nuclear genome was 0.086×, and breadth of the coverage was 6.9%. As inferred from the ratio of reads mapped to the Y and X chromosomes, the Higashimyo skeleton examined in this study was considered male (Supplementary Table 2). The Y-chromosome haplogroup was classified into D1b. D1b-specific alleles were observed at all six SNP sites defining this haplogroup. However, no further subdivision of the D1b haplogroup was possible because of data limitations


    Our results indicate that the Jomon people formed clusters with each other in PCA and phylogenetic trees. This finding indicates that the people responsible for the Jomon culture may be genetically derived from a common ancestral group. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that the Y-chromosome haplogroup D1b found in the Funadomari Jomon (Kanzawa-Kiriyama et al., 2019) was also detected in the Higashimyo individual.
    Judging from the Y-chromosome DNA haplogroup observed in all the Jomon specimens that have ever been analyzed (Kanzawa-Kiriyama et al., 2019 and this study), haplogroup D1b is expected to be common in the Jomon population. Interestingly, haplogroup D, which contained D1b, remains in areas separated by the seas and mountains of Asia, such as the modern-day Himalayan region and Japan. These findings suggest that this haplogroup was originally widely distributed and later isolated. The geographical environment of the Japanese archipelago, which is separated by the sea, may have prevented interaction between the influx of people during the Paleolithic period and the continental population, which resulted in the formation of the unique genetic characteristics of the Jomon people.



    p,s
    big wow
    this is up to date the oldest D remain in east asia dated to more than 5000 bc

    https://i.imgur.com/f7h2KAW.png



    Last edited by kingjohn; 29-04-21 at 17:02.
    https://www.yfull.com/tree/E-FGC7391/

    https://yfull.com/mtree/H3ap/

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    19-03-18
    Location
    Wellington
    Age
    66
    Posts
    104

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    R1b-L21 DF5>BY154246
    MtDNA haplogroup
    J1c3b2

    Ethnic group
    Maori Irish French Scottish English
    Country: New Zealand



    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by kingjohn View Post
    Abstract
    Starting 16000 years ago, the Neolithic lifestyle known as the Jomon culture spread across the Japanese archipelago.
    A Neolithic culture 16,000 years ago? Surely that would make Jomon the earliest Neolithic culture in the world.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    12-11-19
    Posts
    143


    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    here neolithic means with pottery, not agriculture
    here is the oldest pottery found in the world : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xianren_Cave
    19-20 ka near the Yangzi river
    also earliest findings of rice

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    12-11-19
    Posts
    143


    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    1 members found this post helpful.
    afaik, all Jomon Y-DNA sequenced till now belong to haplo D1b-Z3660

  5. #5
    Regular Member kingjohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-09-16
    Posts
    1,048

    Y-DNA haplogroup
    rare E-FGC7391
    MtDNA haplogroup
    h3ap

    Country: Uruguay



    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur 2 View Post
    afaik, all Jomon Y-DNA sequenced till now belong to haplo D1b-Z3660
    Yes it look like they were mainly D
    And the yayoi probabaly brought the O
    To japan

    https://jomon-japan.jp/en/jomon-cultur/

  6. #6
    Satyavrata Maciamo's Avatar
    Join Date
    17-07-02
    Location
    Lothier
    Posts
    9,468


    Ethnic group
    Italo-celto-germanic
    Country: Belgium - Brussels



    1 members found this post helpful.
    The Jomon culture is normally considered a Mesolithic culture, even if they had some pottery.
    My book selection---Follow me on Facebook and Twitter --- My profile on Academia.edu and on ResearchGate ----Check Wa-pedia's Japan Guide
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "What is the use of living, if it be not to strive for noble causes and to make this muddled world a better place for those who will live in it after we are gone?", Winston Churchill.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •