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Thread: floods in Belgium and Germany

  1. #1
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    Country: Belgium - Flanders



    floods in Belgium and Germany

    Belgium :

    On 15 July, all residents of the city of Liège with a population of approximately 200,000 were urged to evacuate amidst fears that the River Meuse was on the verge of bursting its banks and that a dam bridge could collapse.[15][11][16] No vehicles were allowed into the city centre of Liège; traffic was only allowed to leave as part of the evacuation.[17] By 16 July, several smaller municipalities in Limburg Province were also given the order to evacuate.[18] In addition, due to the heavy flooding and because tens of home fuel tanks had broken loose and started leaking into rivers. A number of municipalities in Liège and Namur provinces were left without potable tap water.[19] Around 41,000 households were left without electricity in Wallonia.[20] Foundations of buildings near rivers became eroded and buildings collapsed. In the town of Pepinster on the banks of the river Vesder, at least 20 houses collapsed and 23 of the 31 casualties as of 18 July were found here. The town of Verviers was also badly affected[21] and has more than 10,000 of its residents having to be moved because of homes having become inhabitable. Widespread looting has also been a problem.
    Precipitation was most intense in the east of Belgium, with 271.5 millimetres (10.69 in) of rain over 48 hours in the municipality of Jalhay, in the province of Liège -- an absolute record for Belgium, almost three times the average rainfall over one month in this location for July. In the town of Spa, also in Liège, 217 millimetres (8.5 in) of rain fell over 48 hours.[22] Large parts of the province of Luxembourg saw between 150 mm and 200 mm over 48 hours. In Flanders, the maximum rainfall was 77 millimetres (3.0 in) over 48 hours at Ransberg. In Dilsen-Stokkem, Limburg, the river Maas (Meuse) reached a flux of 3300 m3/s on 16 July, equalling the maximum flow that the local dykes are designed to withstand.[citation needed]

    Germany :


    With at least 172 deaths,[1] the floods are the deadliest natural disaster in Germany since the North Sea flood of 1962.[36][37][38] As of 16 July 2021, at least 1,300 people were still missing,[39] but mostly due to mobile networks being down in some regions which made it difficult to call people.[40] It was considered unlikely that the number of deaths would rise that high,[41] and while on 19 July the exact number of missing persons remained unclear, search was ongoing for at least 150 people.[42] Some 15,000 police, soldiers and emergency service workers have been deployed in Germany to help with the search and rescue.[43]
    During the floods, 122 people died in Rhineland-Palatinate (all of whom were in the district of Ahrweiler),[1] 48 in North Rhine-Westphalia (twenty-seven of whom in Euskirchen),[1] and two in Bavaria.[1]<--! The death in Baden-Wurrtemberg as reported here: [44] is not ruled to be directly related to the flooding and thus not given in the other sources. The police is investigating the cause of death, but please do not add back in unless other sources agree this is flood-related. --> Four firefighters are among the dead.[45][46] Westnetz, Germany's biggest power distribution grid, stated on 15 July that 200,000 properties in the North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate regions were without power,[47] and that it would be impossible to repair substations until roads were cleared.[48] On 16 July, around 102,000 people were still without power.[49] The German Weather Service reported that the quantity of rain in some areas of Germany was the highest in over 100 years, possibly higher than any seen in the last 1,000 years.[50][10] They reported that some areas had received a month's average rainfall in one day.[50]
    Some of the worst damage from the flood was in the district of Ahrweiler, Rhineland-Palatinate, where the river Ahr rose, destroying many buildings and causing at least 110 deaths.[51] The topography of Ahr valley in western Germany, with some sections resembling gorges, may have exacerbated the effects of the heavy rainfall.[52] The flooding here was the worst since 1910 when up to 200 people were killed in flash flooding. On 14 July, the city of Hagen declared a state of emergency, after the Volme river started overflowing its banks.[48] The village of Kordel in Trier-Saarburg, which has around 2,000 residents, has been completely cut off.[47] Several rivers reached their highest water level to date, including the Kyll, which rose from an average level of 1 metre (3.3 ft) to 7.85 metres (25.8 ft).[53]



    tens of thousands of people are homeless
    some rely on meals distributed by the red cross
    in certain areas no internet, no electricity, no water

    cleaning has started
    so far collected waiste is more than 75 % of waiste collected in Wallonia in a full year
    the waiste is stored on a 5 km abandonned highway and, this stretch of highway is getting completely filled

    cleaning and most urgent reparations will take months ..

    for the moment it is sunny and 26-27°C during day time
    the swollen rivers and water basins have to be discharged as fast as possible, because from next saturday, new heavy rainfall may occur ..


  2. #2
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur 2 View Post
    Belgium :

    On 15 July, all residents of the city of Liège with a population of approximately 200,000 were urged to evacuate amidst fears that the River Meuse was on the verge of bursting its banks and that a dam bridge could collapse.[15][11][16] No vehicles were allowed into the city centre of Liège; traffic was only allowed to leave as part of the evacuation.[17] By 16 July, several smaller municipalities in Limburg Province were also given the order to evacuate.[18] In addition, due to the heavy flooding and because tens of home fuel tanks had broken loose and started leaking into rivers. A number of municipalities in Liège and Namur provinces were left without potable tap water.[19] Around 41,000 households were left without electricity in Wallonia.[20] Foundations of buildings near rivers became eroded and buildings collapsed. In the town of Pepinster on the banks of the river Vesder, at least 20 houses collapsed and 23 of the 31 casualties as of 18 July were found here. The town of Verviers was also badly affected[21] and has more than 10,000 of its residents having to be moved because of homes having become inhabitable. Widespread looting has also been a problem.
    Precipitation was most intense in the east of Belgium, with 271.5 millimetres (10.69 in) of rain over 48 hours in the municipality of Jalhay, in the province of Liège -- an absolute record for Belgium, almost three times the average rainfall over one month in this location for July. In the town of Spa, also in Liège, 217 millimetres (8.5 in) of rain fell over 48 hours.[22] Large parts of the province of Luxembourg saw between 150 mm and 200 mm over 48 hours. In Flanders, the maximum rainfall was 77 millimetres (3.0 in) over 48 hours at Ransberg. In Dilsen-Stokkem, Limburg, the river Maas (Meuse) reached a flux of 3300 m3/s on 16 July, equalling the maximum flow that the local dykes are designed to withstand.[citation needed]

    Germany :


    With at least 172 deaths,[1] the floods are the deadliest natural disaster in Germany since the North Sea flood of 1962.[36][37][38] As of 16 July 2021, at least 1,300 people were still missing,[39] but mostly due to mobile networks being down in some regions which made it difficult to call people.[40] It was considered unlikely that the number of deaths would rise that high,[41] and while on 19 July the exact number of missing persons remained unclear, search was ongoing for at least 150 people.[42] Some 15,000 police, soldiers and emergency service workers have been deployed in Germany to help with the search and rescue.[43]
    During the floods, 122 people died in Rhineland-Palatinate (all of whom were in the district of Ahrweiler),[1] 48 in North Rhine-Westphalia (twenty-seven of whom in Euskirchen),[1] and two in Bavaria.[1]<--! The death in Baden-Wurrtemberg as reported here: [44] is not ruled to be directly related to the flooding and thus not given in the other sources. The police is investigating the cause of death, but please do not add back in unless other sources agree this is flood-related. --> Four firefighters are among the dead.[45][46] Westnetz, Germany's biggest power distribution grid, stated on 15 July that 200,000 properties in the North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate regions were without power,[47] and that it would be impossible to repair substations until roads were cleared.[48] On 16 July, around 102,000 people were still without power.[49] The German Weather Service reported that the quantity of rain in some areas of Germany was the highest in over 100 years, possibly higher than any seen in the last 1,000 years.[50][10] They reported that some areas had received a month's average rainfall in one day.[50]
    Some of the worst damage from the flood was in the district of Ahrweiler, Rhineland-Palatinate, where the river Ahr rose, destroying many buildings and causing at least 110 deaths.[51] The topography of Ahr valley in western Germany, with some sections resembling gorges, may have exacerbated the effects of the heavy rainfall.[52] The flooding here was the worst since 1910 when up to 200 people were killed in flash flooding. On 14 July, the city of Hagen declared a state of emergency, after the Volme river started overflowing its banks.[48] The village of Kordel in Trier-Saarburg, which has around 2,000 residents, has been completely cut off.[47] Several rivers reached their highest water level to date, including the Kyll, which rose from an average level of 1 metre (3.3 ft) to 7.85 metres (25.8 ft).[53]



    tens of thousands of people are homeless
    some rely on meals distributed by the red cross
    in certain areas no internet, no electricity, no water

    cleaning has started
    so far collected waiste is more than 75 % of waiste collected in Wallonia in a full year
    the waiste is stored on a 5 km abandonned highway and, this stretch of highway is getting completely filled

    cleaning and most urgent reparations will take months ..

    for the moment it is sunny and 26-27°C during day time
    the swollen rivers and water basins have to be discharged as fast as possible, because from next saturday, new heavy rainfall may occur ..

    Spooky.
    On the other side of the world, this season's monsoons seem to be particularly severe.

    At Least 25 People Killed In China’s Henan Province In Worst Flooding In 1,000 Years

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/isabelt...in-1000-years/

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