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Thread: Ancient genomes from a rural site in Imperial Rome (1st–3rd cent. CE): a genetic jun

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    Ancient genomes from a rural site in Imperial Rome (1st–3rd cent. CE): a genetic jun

    another interesting paper

    Ancient genomes from a rural site in Imperial Rome (1st–3rd cent. CE): a genetic junction in the Roman Empire

    Abstract

    Background

    Rome became the prosperous Capital of the Roman Empire through the political and military conquests of neighbouring areas. People were able to move Romeward modifying the Rome area’s demographic structure. However, the genomic evidence for the population of one of the broadest Empires in antiquity has been sparse until recently.



    Aim

    The genomic analysis of people buried in Quarto Cappello del Prete (QCP) necropolis was carried out to help elucidate the genomic structure of Imperial Rome inhabitants.



    Subjects and methods

    We recruited twenty-five individuals from QCP for ancient DNA analysis through whole-genome sequencing. Multiple investigations were carried out to unveil the genetic components featuring in the studied samples and the community’s putative demographic structure.



    Results

    We generated reliable whole-genome data for 7 samples surviving quality controls. The distribution of Imperial Romans from QCP partly overlaps with present-day Southern Mediterranean and Southern-Near Eastern populations.



    Conclusion

    The genomic legacy with the south-eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea and the Central and Western Northern-African coast funerary influence pave the way for considering people buried in QCP as resembling a Punic-derived human group.


    https://i.imgur.com/Dt57VS1.png












    source:

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/...0.2021.1944313



    p.s
    from what i understand from anthrogenica
    they are in bad coverage but still the fact that some of them cluster
    with north africans and jordanians is pretty cool
    they might have been traders of punic ancestery
    ancestery :
    mostly western jewish here is the overlapp with south europe[U]

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    Anyone have access to the actual paper? He's been researching sites in these suburbs of Rome for a long time, back to 2015 and before. He's never called it a rural community before, so that's a first. In his prior papers he's called that entire area a suburb of Rome.

    Some of the sites are noted for their quarries and tanneries, and the burials associated with them likely being those of workers in those industries. Imo, that would signal slaves, Other burials seem to belong to people of more means. At Casal Bertone, for example, the remains are divided into two groups, with a few members of the leadership, based on their diet, buried with the workers. Since many denizens of the city itself were buried outside Rome, we would need more information on some of these sites in order to put the samples into context.

    As to the site in question, this is what he has to say about it.

    Food at the heart of the Empire: dietary reconstruction for Imperial Rome inhabitants | SpringerLink

    " More than 70% of the buried people were infants and juveniles; 50% of them were in the 0–6 years age range, and more than half of them seem to have suffered from dysmorphic alterations (De Angelis et al. 2015)."

    "The Tukey HSD test (Maxwell and Delaney 2003; Dubitzky et al. 2013) was performed to determine which cemetery pairs underpin the differences in δ15N, accounting for multiple comparisons and maintaining experiment-wise alpha at 0.05 (Yuan and Maxwell 2005). The significant differences were found between Quarto Cappello del Prete and all the other cemeteries (Table 8). This result supports the peculiar status of the cultual site of Quarto Cappello del Prete respect to the other cemeteries in Imperial Rome that were instead related to low-social strata and working communities. Remarkably, Quarto Cappello del Prete isotopic values are not consistent with those obtained for the roughly coeval Gabines (Killgrove and Tykot 2018), the people inhabiting the ancient city of Gabii, a formerly independent city tackling a population contraction in Imperial age, just a few kilometers far from Quarto Cappello del Prete. The differences (δ13C F: 5.08, p = 0.03; δ15N F: 13.81, p < 0.01 that shift to δ13C F:4.05, p = 0.05; δ15N F: 14.63, p < 0.01 by excluding one outlier and three putatively breastfed children, according to Killgrove and Tykot 2018) seem to confirm that Quarto Cappello del Prete related to a site where shortlisted individuals rather than a living community were buried (De Angelis et al. 2015)."

    So, was this the burial site for some specific group? Why so many children?

    I'm eager to read the new paper and hopefully get a better understanding of the context.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela View Post
    Anyone have access to the actual paper? He's been researching sites in these suburbs of Rome for a long time, back to 2015 and before. He's never called it a rural community before, so that's a first. In his prior papers he's called that entire area a suburb of Rome.

    Some of the sites are noted for their quarries and tanneries, and the burials associated with them likely being those of workers in those industries. Imo, that would signal slaves, Other burials seem to belong to people of more means. At Casal Bertone, for example, the remains are divided into two groups, with a few members of the leadership, based on their diet, buried with the workers. Since many denizens of the city itself were buried outside Rome, we would need more information on some of these sites in order to put the samples into context.

    As to the site in question, this is what he has to say about it.

    Food at the heart of the Empire: dietary reconstruction for Imperial Rome inhabitants | SpringerLink

    " More than 70% of the buried people were infants and juveniles; 50% of them were in the 0–6 years age range, and more than half of them seem to have suffered from dysmorphic alterations (De Angelis et al. 2015)."

    "The Tukey HSD test (Maxwell and Delaney 2003; Dubitzky et al. 2013) was performed to determine which cemetery pairs underpin the differences in δ15N, accounting for multiple comparisons and maintaining experiment-wise alpha at 0.05 (Yuan and Maxwell 2005). The significant differences were found between Quarto Cappello del Prete and all the other cemeteries (Table 8). This result supports the peculiar status of the cultual site of Quarto Cappello del Prete respect to the other cemeteries in Imperial Rome that were instead related to low-social strata and working communities. Remarkably, Quarto Cappello del Prete isotopic values are not consistent with those obtained for the roughly coeval Gabines (Killgrove and Tykot 2018), the people inhabiting the ancient city of Gabii, a formerly independent city tackling a population contraction in Imperial age, just a few kilometers far from Quarto Cappello del Prete. The differences (δ13C F: 5.08, p = 0.03; δ15N F: 13.81, p < 0.01 that shift to δ13C F:4.05, p = 0.05; δ15N F: 14.63, p < 0.01 by excluding one outlier and three putatively breastfed children, according to Killgrove and Tykot 2018) seem to confirm that Quarto Cappello del Prete related to a site where shortlisted individuals rather than a living community were buried (De Angelis et al. 2015)."

    So, was this the burial site for some specific group? Why so many children?

    I'm eager to read the new paper and hopefully get a better understanding of the context.

    access is cost money USD 57.00 which is a bummer
    if i am not wrong
    the punic use to sacrifise children https://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2014-01-23...their-children
    who knows maybe they were punic slaves ( that would be inline with low status)
    who unfortuantley
    continue to practice it even in there new home

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    2 members found this post helpful.
    @ Angela @ kingjohn




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    Quote Originally Posted by Pax Augusta View Post
    @ Angela @ kingjohn



    Thank you, Pax. Hardly the countryside, yes? :)

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    I'm not clear on whether these "dysmorphic alterations" in these children were congenital or were the result of some procedure after birth.

    Is there something in the tanning of skins which might lead to birth defects (such as alum and/or alkaline lime, or could it be because of incest?

    I'm very familiar with child sacrifice to Moloch in the ancient Canaanite religion, which was transferred to the Carthaginians. However, while the Canaanite gods bred with their sisters, as did the Egyptian gods, I don't know whether incest between parent/child or siblings was widespread generally or just for the royal rulers.

    Any of this would explain the findings in the burials.

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    Angela: Thanks, found the forum!

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    hmm ..........only 1 x ydna found out ................maybe their level to find ydna is too high

    from paper
    We leveraged Y chromosome reads to identify the Y-Chr haplogroup for the males. However, we were able to type only one sample proficiently. QCP42 presents variants leading to the T1a (TM70) haplogroup. The mitochondrial DNA haplogroups were also determined for all the samples with mtDNA coverage > 1×.



    but easy to find mtDna


    SampleID Haplogroup
    QCP2 U5a’b
    QCP11 T2
    QCP14 H84
    QCP17 NA
    QCP19 H1u
    QCP23 HV
    QCP26 NA
    QCP27 H1h1
    QCP28 J2b1
    QCP29 H1u
    QCP30 NA
    QCP32 H
    QCP33 NA
    QCP37 H1ap1
    QCP38 NA
    QCP39 H1u
    QCP40 H4a1
    QCP42 U3b1
    QCP43 I5
    Fathers mtdna ...... T2b17
    Grandfather mtdna ... T1a1e
    Sons mtdna ...... K1a4p
    Mothers line ..... R1b-S8172
    Grandmother paternal side ... I1-CTS6397
    Wife paternal line ..... R1a-Z282

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    They got one Y Haplogroup, … QCP42 as T-M70 (T1a)

    … for perspective: Latin R850 and Roman 1543 are T1a1… - Roman R120 is T1a2…

    … we were able to type only one sample proficiently. QCP42 presents variants leading to the T1a (TM70) haplogroup. The mitochondrial DNA haplogroups were also determined for all the samples with mtDNA coverage > 1× …

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    They got one Y Haplogroup, … QCP42 as T-M70 (T1a)
    … for perspective: Latin R850 is T1a1… - Romans R120 and is T1a2…
    … we were able to type only one sample proficiently. QCP42 presents variants leading to the T1a (TM70) haplogroup. The mitochondrial DNA haplogroups were also determined for all the samples with mtDNA coverage > 1× …

    The paper places QCP42 as "tunisian" ...........maybe a Carthage prisoner or numidian cavalry which fought for rome at the end of the punic wars

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    Quote Originally Posted by torzio View Post
    The paper places QCP42 as "tunisian" ...........maybe a Carthage prisoner or numidian cavalry which fought for rome at the end of the punic wars
    No e-m81 bummer... ( maybe they were but low coverage)
    But happy for you T guys
    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/...0.2021.1944313
    They say in the pdf that 4 of them cluster with
    North african ( tunisians)
    Maybe they were mumidian soldiers descendents...

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    Quote Originally Posted by torzio View Post
    The paper places QCP42 as "tunisian" ...........maybe a Carthage prisoner or numidian cavalry which fought for rome at the end of the punic wars
    maybe, though I’m just glad we are making a Y presence because we didn’t show up in the last 2 studies at all (Etruscans and Daunians).

    …. I know, … QCP42 is T1a, we’re T1a2, … far and different y T branch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    maybe, though I’m just glad we are making a Y presence because we didn’t show up in the last 2 studies at all (Etruscans and Daunians).

    …. I know, QCP42 is T1a, we’re T1a2, … different y T branch.

    You also got another T dude in the last serbian roman paper

    Roman age:
    I15532 Viminacium, Pecine Necropolis T-L206,T-M70,T-L131 J2b1c

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingjohn View Post
    You also got another T dude in the last serbian roman paper
    Roman age:
    I15532 Viminacium, Pecine Necropolis T-L206,T-M70,T-L131 J2b1c
    Thanks, … I was referring to samples found in Italy :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingjohn View Post
    No e-m81 bummer... ( maybe they were but low coverage)
    But happy for you T guys
    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/...0.2021.1944313
    They say in the pdf that 4 of them cluster with
    North african ( tunisians)
    Maybe they were mumidian soldiers descendents...
    today we don’t necessarily associate Haplogroups with someone’s ethnicity, … It was probably the same around Rome, Italy and so on at the height of the Roman Empire.

    … finding ancient y T is a big deal for us, we’re ridiculously under represented :)

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    fyi …

    my y T clade (and Torzio) geo-location

    Tree: Europe Middle Bronze Age
    Map: Italy





    http://scaledinnovation.com/gg/snpTracker.html

    https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki...ump-to-license

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    page 5 from pdf above

    To compare individuals of Imperial Rome to contemporary and modern populations, we performed principal component analysis (PCA). The samples from QCP and 141 roughly coevr al samples from topographically scattered areas were projected onto the genetic variation of 535 present-day individuals from North Africa and Eurasia (Figure 2 andSupplementary Figure 1). Only the samples sharing more than 5,000 variants across the dataset were plotted(Supplementary Table 2) and were used for further analyses after checking the contamination rate (Table 3).Even though only seven samples survived the considered threshold, the distribution of samples from QCP appears to be slightly different from that described by Antonio and colleagues (2019), as reported in the PCA plot.Imperial Rome individuals from QCP suggest a certain degree of similarity with North African and Middle Eastern individuals. Specifically, QCP43 is placed among present-day Israelis and Jordanians, while QCP29, QCP39, QCP40, and QCP42 fall in the North African cluster. QCP27 and QCP37 lie in an intermediate position between the North Africans and the Eastern Mediterranean people (Supplementary Figure 1)

    https://i.imgur.com/TTaQiGU.jpg

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    … unlike this study, Antonio released the samples to the public, they did Not.
    (I trust Antonio)

    I’m starting to suspect that studies that don’t release their sample’s bam don’t blindly trust the DNA results (contamination, poor sample quality)

    … another example is the Daunians paper, … it says that the samples are on ENA, though the link is blank, … and I cant locate it.

    Edit:

    and how about the 82 “Etruscans” samples, … the opposite situation, we have the bams without the paper / study, … we assume they’re real, but are they really?
    Last edited by Salento; 06-09-21 at 17:37.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salento View Post
    maybe, though I’m just glad we are making a Y presence because we didn’t show up in the last 2 studies at all (Etruscans and Daunians).

    …. I know, … QCP42 is T1a, we’re T1a2, … far and different y T branch.

    our T is found in the mongol paper ...........sample 100718

    Whole-genome sequencing of 175 Mongolians uncovers population-specific genetic architecture and gene flow throughout North and East Asia

    Abaga

    1/15 T-M70 > T-L131(xCTS3767) This Abaga individual's Y-DNA forms a clade with members of T-L131 > T-CTS3767 (NA20758_TSI, HG01530_IBS, HG01051_PUR) vis-à-vis members of T-CTS11451 (NA20520_TSI, HG01190_PUR, NA19655_MXL, HG01133_CLM, NA20527_TSI). However, his Y-DNA is quite distinct from the Y-DNA of members of T-CTS3767. He most likely should belong to T-L131* like YF15081 from Armenia or to the T-Y13244 clade (Arabs, Turkey, Jew, England, etc.).

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    So, a bunch of tanners and quarry workers in a suburb of Spain were North African or Israelite like...

    What are we to glean from that?

    If they were indeed 1st century Jews, they could have been captives from the various Jewish Rebellions against Rome, poor souls.

    How long a life span do you think these poor slaves had, especially the ones in the quarries? How much breeding do you think they did?
    Last edited by Angela; 07-09-21 at 22:08.

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    Dear Italian friends, can I ask you a favour because Im trying to wrap my head around some autosomal
    facts?

    Id really like to see the results you get in the calculators you use if you included Russian Sarmatian or the coordinates of any North East European that you possess.

    Has any of you tried this exercise by using 2 sources of populations, 1 lets say Roman Republican/Imperial + Sarmatian/Russian (or whatever you prefer)?

    Obviously Imperial Rome experienced migrations (internal and external) and received different layers with time, but I havent seen any post discussing possible Slavic input from Imperial Rome to modern times, for obvious reasons of course as Slavs didnt really settle much in Italy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dushman View Post
    Dear Italian friends, can I ask you a favour because I�m trying to wrap my head around some autosomal
    facts?
    I�d really like to see the results you get in the calculators you use if you included Russian Sarmatian or the coordinates of any North East European that you possess.
    Has any of you tried this exercise by using 2 sources of populations, 1 let�s say Roman Republican/Imperial + Sarmatian/Russian (or whatever you prefer)?
    Obviously Imperial Rome experienced migrations (internal and external) and received different layers with time, but I haven�t seen any post discussing possible Slavic input from Imperial Rome to modern times, for obvious reasons of course as Slavs didn�t really settle much in Italy.
    from what I have seen north Eastern Italians do score some slavic in calculators but no more than 10-15%. In the rest of Italy is pretty much non existent

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dushman View Post
    Dear Italian friends, can I ask you a favour because I�m trying to wrap my head around some autosomal
    facts?

    I�d really like to see the results you get in the calculators you use if you included Russian Sarmatian or the coordinates of any North East European that you possess.

    Has any of you tried this exercise by using 2 sources of populations, 1 let�s say Roman Republican/Imperial + Sarmatian/Russian (or whatever you prefer)?

    Obviously Imperial Rome experienced migrations (internal and external) and received different layers with time, but I haven�t seen any post discussing possible Slavic input from Imperial Rome to modern times, for obvious reasons of course as Slavs didn�t really settle much in Italy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill7 View Post
    from what I have seen north Eastern Italians do score some slavic in calculators but no more than 10-15%. In the rest of Italy is pretty much non existent
    There is a couple of ways to go at this through autosomal calculators.

    1. Test Italian averages with the same model, Balkan IA + Mordovian (Russian). If they are above 25%, discard this model as garbage.
    2. Try to pinpoint what the model is picking
    a) Test Mordovian and Russian in models that include Slavic and see how much Slavic they come out.
    b) Test pure ancient Balts, with a component in the models being (each point is separate model)
    a1) Slavic
    a2) Mordovian
    a3) Russian
    ~ if say Balts come out as 30% Medieval Slavic like (Medieval Moravian Samples) with the rest being other ancient N/NE components the again the model in the Danubian limes paper should be taken as garbage.

    We just have to wait for the BAMs.
    I am interested to know as well.
    “Man cannot live without a permanent trust in something indestructible in himself, and at the same time that indestructible something as well as his trust in it may remain permanently concealed from him.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by Archetype0ne View Post
    There is a couple of ways to go at this through autosomal calculators.

    1. Test Italian averages with the same model, Balkan IA + Mordovian (Russian). If they are above 25%, discard this model as garbage.
    2. Try to pinpoint what the model is picking
    a) Test Mordovian and Russian in models that include Slavic and see how much Slavic they come out.
    b) Test pure ancient Balts, with a component in the models being (each point is separate model)
    a1) Slavic
    a2) Mordovian
    a3) Russian
    ~ if say Balts come out as 30% Medieval Slavic like (Medieval Moravian Samples) with the rest being other ancient N/NE components the again the model in the Danubian limes paper should be taken as garbage.

    We just have to wait for the BAMs.
    I am interested to know as well.
    Exactly my point even as a beginner and completely ignorant on autosomal calculators. I was hoping someone will cover my lack of experience but I suppose BAM files means the so-called coordinates to test it.

    I want to know also how much Slavic these proper Slavs get, over 90%? If not, its like saying Albanians and Mainland Greeks are 30% Bulgarian when Bulgarians are around 50% Slavic.

    I also dont see how North-East Italians can be 15% Slavic on average. Then whats their supposed Germanic percentage and whats left of their old Italic, only 50%?

    Very confusing results overall. Maybe Autosomal DNA tests are still in their infancy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill7 View Post
    from what I have seen north Eastern Italians do score some slavic in calculators but no more than 10-15%. In the rest of Italy is pretty much non existent

    from vahaduo
    k13 updated spreadsheet

    Italian_Romagna,26.31,11.19,23.14,10.18,24.32,3.81,0.08,0.35,0.07,0.27,0.14,0 .14,0

    Italian_Emilia,29.66,11.98,24.47,8.33,21.32,2.94,0.27,0.23,0,0.3,0.3,0.16,0. 04

    Italian_Veneto,32.25,15.08,23.66,7.48,18.38,1.65,0.25,0.4,0.24,0.27,0.3,0,0.0 4

    Italian_Friuli_VG,32.26,16.88,20.62,7.19,18.53,2.99,0.31,0.3,0.05,0.8,0.02,0.04 ,0.01

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