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Thread: Evidence of Europe’s first Homo sapiens found in French cave

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    4 members found this post helpful.

    Evidence of Europe’s first Homo sapiens found in French cave

    A study published on 9 February in Science Advances1 argues that distinctive stone tools and a lone child’s tooth were left by Homo sapiens during a short stay, some 54,000 years ago — and not by Neanderthals, who lived in the rock shelter for thousands of years before and after that time.

    Most of the stone tools resemble artefacts categorized as ‘Mousterian technology’ that are found at Neanderthal sites across Eurasia, says Slimak. But one of the shelter’s archaeological levels — known as layer E and dated to between 56,800 and 51,700 years ago — contains tools such as sharpened points and small blades that are more typical of early
    Homo sapiens technology. Slimak says the layer E stone tools resemble those found at much younger sites in southern France, left by makers unknown, as well as those from similarly aged sites in the Middle East that are linked to Homo sapiens.

    These tools arrived in the Levant just 50.000 years ago - it's called the 'Emiran'
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emiran

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d415...9MSxEAkXWz9Xs8

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    IMO our ancestors were in Eurasia way earlier - when the Nubyan Complex arrived in southern Arabia, dated to 106 ka
    this was haplogroup BT

    in Taramsa, Nile Valley the Nubyan Complex was replaced by a similar technology containing blade tools 50-55 ka.
    This marks the backmigration of haplo E into Africa

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    the cave :

    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grotte_Mandrin

    La grotte Mandrin est un abri sous roche, situé dans la commune de Malataverne, dans la Drôme, en Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, dans la région naturelle et historique du Tricastin. Elle a été occupée au Paléolithique moyen et supérieur, de 120 000 ans à 42 000 ans avant le présent1. Pour la période la plus ancienne, l'Éémien, une période interglaciaire particulièrement tempérée, les températures ont même été très élevées sur une quinzaine de millénaires2. Elle fait l'objet de fouilles archéologiques.

    similarities with the Levant :

    Assemblages archéologiques[modifier | modifier le code]

    Des similitudes rapprochent des assemblages archéologiques de la grotte Mandrin (couche E) et ceux trouvés dans un site levantin, Ksar Akil au Liban (couches XXV à XXI) ; les chercheurs supposent une origine externe à l'Europe des industries de la grotte rhodanienne, en accord avec l'hypothèse d'une dispersion de l'Homme moderne du Proche-Orient vers l'Europe dans la période initiale du Paléolithique supérieur3,4,5. Ludovic Slimak estime possible qu'« une communauté sapiens probablement venue du Levant » ait fait une « incursion dans la vallée du Rhône »6. Le paléoanthropologue Jean-Jacques Hublin quant à lui estime que cette hypothèse reste à confirmer6.

    but now these findings are dated earlier than in the Levant

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    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur 2 View Post
    IMO our ancestors were in Eurasia way earlier - when the Nubyan Complex arrived in southern Arabia, dated to 106 ka
    this was haplogroup BT

    in Taramsa, Nile Valley the Nubyan Complex was replaced by a similar technology containing blade tools 50-55 ka.
    This marks the backmigration of haplo E into Africa
    I don't think there's something like "the moment when we got out of Africa", since it seems to have happened over and over again.

    Ans also, I doubt of the "out of Africa theory", since it seems there Hominins all over the Middle East to Morocco.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mmiikkii View Post
    I don't think there's something like "the moment when we got out of Africa", since it seems to have happened over and over again.

    Ans also, I doubt of the "out of Africa theory", since it seems there Hominins all over the Middle East to Morocco.
    you're right, there were multiple out of Africa's, but they all went extinct (apart from Basal Eurasian only minimal fractions of their DNA remains), except our ancestors

    our ancestors switched from Nubyan Complex to blade tools inside Eurasia

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    1 members found this post helpful.
    more on this topic :

    https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...Y#.YgWRHSGM_GI

    Dental remains from the cave represent at least seven individuals across 12 archaeological layers. The researchers identified six of these individuals as Neanderthal, but in a layer sandwiched between the Neanderthal layers, a fossil molar from a modern human child was found.



    ‘The Mandrin findings document the first clearly demonstrable alternating occupation of a site by Neanderthals and modern humans,’ said Professor Stringer. ‘We’ve often thought that the arrival of modern humans in Europe led to the pretty rapid demise of Neanderthals, but this new evidence suggests that both the appearance of modern humans in Europe and disappearance of Neanderthals is much more complex than that’.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur 2 View Post
    more on this topic :

    https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...Y#.YgWRHSGM_GI

    Dental remains from the cave represent at least seven individuals across 12 archaeological layers. The researchers identified six of these individuals as Neanderthal, but in a layer sandwiched between the Neanderthal layers, a fossil molar from a modern human child was found.
    I hope they can extract DNA from the pulp in that molar, the genome would be very interesting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamakore View Post
    I hope they can extract DNA from the pulp in that molar, the genome would be very interesting.
    The authors tried to extract DNA from animal bones in the same layer, failed, and opted to wait for better methods to appear.

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