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Thread: Hoabinhian DNA

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    Hoabinhian DNA

    afaik the only Hoabinhian DNA we have is from 2 males, La368 and Ma911 in this study :

    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/278374v1.full

    they seem to form a deeply divergent clade, somewhat related to the Onge tribe on the Andaman Islands

    does any one know their Y-DNA

    are there more Hoabinhian samples with their DNA known?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bicicleur View Post
    afaik the only Hoabinhian DNA we have is from 2 males, La368 and Ma911 in this study :
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/278374v1.full
    they seem to form a deeply divergent clade, somewhat related to the Onge tribe on the Andaman Islands
    does any one know their Y-DNA
    are there more Hoabinhian samples with their DNA known?



    La368 - Pha Faen C-K150 (C1b) M5 7872 Laos - Hunter-gatherer, Hoabinhian, flexed buri


    Ma911 - Gua Cha Cave D-M174 (D) M21b1a 4309 Malaysia - Phase 1 - Hoabinhian


    i think they cluster autosomally speaking even though Ma911 is from different site and dates to the bronze age
    his autosomal profile his like the La368 hoabinhian hunter from laos




    page 25 in the pdf:

    Based on archaeological and anthropological studies, the individuals samples fall into twobroad groups: hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers. The oldest individual comes from PhaFaen (Laos) 6-10,000 years ago (52). The genome belongs to a tall individual (ca. 176 cm) who was identified as male based on an osteological assessment, an assessment we confirm here(Table S3). The individual was found interred in a flexed position (a common Hòabìnhian burial position), dated to 7950-7794 Cal BP and was not interred with any associated mortuary offerings (52). Gua Cha (Malaysia) and Ma Da Dieu (Vietnam) had two phases, the first was Hòabìnhian hunter-gatherers followed by the arrival of Neolithic farmers. Two individuals from Gua Cha were from the former context, while a third is from the latter (53)





    page 30 in pdf:

    We grouped ancient samples according to theirposition in the PCA and their inferred ADMIXTURE ancestry components:
    Group 1 - Ma911,La368; Group 2 - La364, La727, La898, Ma912, Vt833, Vt880; Group 3 - Vt777, Vt779, Vt781,Vt796, Vt808; Group 4 - Th519, Th521, Th530, Th703; Group 5 - In661, In662; Group 6 -Ma554, Ma555, Phl534. Group 3.1 (Th531, Vt719) and Group 4.1 (Vt778) appeared similar inthe PCA and ADMIXTURE to other members of their assigned groups, but were either geographically or temporally distant from the other samples within the group.Group 1 individuals, the ancient Hòabìnhians, share the most drift with present-day Önge,along with Jōmon (Fig. S12, Table S4). Although damage in the ancient samples may amplify this effect, we note that the Jōmon do not share significant drift with any of the other ancient groups. We observe that the closest present-day populations to Group 1 are from the Andaman Islands (Önge), then Kensiu (a Malaysian ‘negrito’ language community), Amis and Jehai,followed by a mix of East and Southeast Asian populations




    source:

    https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/...aper%20ORI.pdf
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    Thank you Kingjohn

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    Thanks for sharing. Someone already posted a summary of this study on Wikipedia's page about the Hoabinhian.

    As of 2022, only two ancient DNA samples have been extracted from individuals excavated in Hoabinhian contexts: one specimen from Laos (c. 7,800 BP) and one from the Malay Peninsula (c. 4,200 BP). While the Upper Paleolithic origins of this 'Hoabinhian ancestry' represented by the two samples are unknown, Hoabinhian ancestry has been found to be related to the main 'East Asian' ancestry component found in most modern East and Southeast Asians, although deeply diverged from it.[14][15] When compared with present-day populations, the sampled ancient Hoabinhian individuals are genetically closest to the Semang (also known as "Malaysian Negritos") and the Maniq in the interior of the Malay Peninsula, and to the Andamanese Onge and Jarawa.
    The emergence of the Neolithic in Southeast Asia went along with a population shift caused by migrations from southern China. Neolithic Mainland Southeast Asian samples predominantly have East Asian ancestry related to ancient populations from southern China, but many of these samples also display admixture with Hoabinhian ancestry or Hoabinhian-related ancestry to a smaller degree. In modern populations, this admixture of East Asian and Hoabinhian (or Hoabinhian-related) ancestry is most strongly associated with Austroasiatic-speaking groups, and can also be reproduced in models where Onge samples are taken as proxies for Hoabinhian ancestry.


    So it looks like the Neolithic population of Mainland Southeast Asia was very different from today and related to minority ethnic groups that survived in the region today like the Semang and the Maniq.

    Here are the Semang.




    And the Maniq




    These people are very probably descended from the first human migration Out of Africa that carried Y-haplogroups C and D to South(east) Asia and Australia.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    Thanks for sharing. Someone already posted a summary of this study on Wikipedia's page about the Hoabinhian.

    As of 2022, only two ancient DNA samples have been extracted from individuals excavated in Hoabinhian contexts: one specimen from Laos (c. 7,800 BP) and one from the Malay Peninsula (c. 4,200 BP). While the Upper Paleolithic origins of this 'Hoabinhian ancestry' represented by the two samples are unknown, Hoabinhian ancestry has been found to be related to the main 'East Asian' ancestry component found in most modern East and Southeast Asians, although deeply diverged from it.[14][15] When compared with present-day populations, the sampled ancient Hoabinhian individuals are genetically closest to the Semang (also known as "Malaysian Negritos") and the Maniq in the interior of the Malay Peninsula, and to the Andamanese Onge and Jarawa.
    The emergence of the Neolithic in Southeast Asia went along with a population shift caused by migrations from southern China. Neolithic Mainland Southeast Asian samples predominantly have East Asian ancestry related to ancient populations from southern China, but many of these samples also display admixture with Hoabinhian ancestry or Hoabinhian-related ancestry to a smaller degree. In modern populations, this admixture of East Asian and Hoabinhian (or Hoabinhian-related) ancestry is most strongly associated with Austroasiatic-speaking groups, and can also be reproduced in models where Onge samples are taken as proxies for Hoabinhian ancestry.


    So it looks like the Neolithic population of Mainland Southeast Asia was very different from today and related to minority ethnic groups that survived in the region today like the Semang and the Maniq.


    These people are very probably descended from the first human migration Out of Africa that carried Y-haplogroups C and D to South(east) Asia and Australia.
    My impression is that allthough the Negrito's all look similar, they are 2 different populations or maybe a mixture of them.

    The Hoabinhians and Australo-Asiatic people.
    The ancient Hoabinhinan DNA indicates that they are not the same.

    I would associate Hoabinhian with haplogroup D and Austro-Asiatic with C1b and some clades of K,
    allthough 1 of the 2 ancient Hoabinhinan samples appears to be C1b and the other D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo View Post
    These people are very probably descended from the first human migration Out of Africa that carried Y-haplogroups C and D to South(east) Asia and Australia.
    And judging by the Andaman Islands, it's very likely that their mt-haplogroup was M.

    I also have postulated that D diverged earlier, and was idolated in Japan, Andaman and Tibet by incoming C like 53,000 ago(judging by D subclade divergence).

    But C already had some N'R, if we look today at Mongolia, Kazakhstan and most importantly, the Aboriginals; they already had N'R haplogroup.

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    Southeast Asia is one of the world's most genetically varied areas, yet scientists have disputed for more than a century whether the hypothesis of the region's population beginnings is true. According to one idea, indigenous Habnhian hunter-gatherers who occupied Southeast Asia 44,000 years ago spontaneously developed agricultural skills without the help of early farmers from East Asia. Another idea, known as the 'two-layer model,' proposes that indigenous Habnhian hunter-gatherers were supplanted by migrant rice farmers from what is now China. For the study, scientists collected DNA from human skeletal remains dating back as far as 8,000 years from Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Laos, and Japan — scientists had previously only been able to sequence 4,000-year-old samples from the region. DNA from Habnhian hunter-gatherers and a Jomon from Japan were also included in the samples, revealing a long-suspected genetic relationship between the two populations for the first time. The researchers looked at 26 ancient human genome sequences and compared them to contemporary DNA samples from humans living in Southeast Asia today. The groundbreaking finding is especially noteworthy because Southeast Asia's heat and humidity make it one of the most challenging conditions for DNA preservation, providing significant problems for scientists.

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