Bioarchaeological Perspectives on Late Antiquity in Dalmatia

Francesco

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Abstract​

Late Antiquity Dalmatia was a time and place of political unrest in the Roman Empire that influenced the lives of the people living in that region. The Late Antique burial site of Hvar – Radošević, spanning the 3rd to 5th centuries, is located on the Croatian Dalmatian island of Hvar. Given the time frame and its location on a busy marine trade route, study of this burial site offers us a glimpse into the lives of the Late Antique population living on this island. It comprises 33 individuals, with 17 buried within a confined grave tomb, and the remaining individuals buried in separate locations in the tomb's proximity. Our objective was to provide new perspectives on the lives of people on the island during those times by studying ancestry, population structure, possible differences within the buried population, dietary habits, and general health. Analysis of the ancestral origins of the individuals buried at Hvar – Radošević revealed a diverse population reflective of the era's genetic variability. The identification of genetic outliers suggests affiliations with distinct regions of the Roman Empire, possibly linked to trade routes associated with the Late Antique port in ancient Hvar. Stable isotope ratio analysis (δ13C and δ15N) indicated a diet mainly consisting of C3 plants, with minimal consumption of marine foods. High childhood mortality rates, physiological stress markers, and dental diseases suggest a low quality of life in the population. Assessment of kinship and dietary patterns revealed no discernible distinctions between individuals buried within the tomb and those buried outside, indicative of an absence of differential burial practices based on social status and familial ties.
 
Unsurprisingly, the population seems to form a cline between Croatia Iron age and the Aegean, since the Island of Hvar (Pharos) was settled by Greeks at the beginning of the IV century.
Screenshot_20240516_180434.jpg
 
The yDNA haplogroups look without a doubt primarily East Mediterreanean-East Balkan and are not local Dalmatian in their origin for the most part. This kind of supports the Greek-related settlement on the island.
 
The yDNA haplogroups look without a doubt primarily East Mediterreanean-East Balkan and are not local Dalmatian in their origin for the most part. This kind of supports the Greek-related settlement on the island.
Agreed on the first part. The J1a and J2a-M410 branches look mainly Middleeastern though. Don't see the Greek connection here. More E1b in late antiquity Western Balkan Cosmopolitan sites makes also sense. The Roman mediated pattern is quite clear here once again.
 
Agreed on the first part. The J1a and J2a-M410 branches look mainly Middleeastern though. Don't see the Greek connection here. More E1b in late antiquity Western Balkan Cosmopolitan sites makes also sense. The Roman mediated pattern is quite clear here once again.
The HG J2 L70 (PH185), probably shows a Greek or Roman connection.
 
The HG J2 L70 (PH185), probably shows a Greek or Roman connection.
Roman yes, Greek no. It has never been found in an ancient Greek archaeogenetic context. The J2a-M410+ haplogroups are already well mapped out there.
 
Roman yes, Greek no. It has never been found in an ancient Greek archaeogenetic context. The J2a-M410+ haplogroups are already well mapped out there.
Indeed Roman, the oldest J2L70 sample published until now is from the Marche region, in central Italy and was classify as roman. Although it could also be Greek. It is true we haven't got yet an ancient Greek J2 L70, it is said ,by different sources, that soon the Reich lab will publish an ancient Greek J L70, from the Bronze age/early Iron age, as it is not yet published I can not said it for sure, but there are some other scientists that states that at least some of the J2L70 in the west were expand by Greeks. For this case you can read the study made by Andrea finocchio et Al on 2018, you can find it on the following link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945646/
 
1715967126562.png

RCO user from genarchivist posted this (y)

Identifiers Haplogroups
Genetic ID Grave Isotope ID mt haplogroup Y chromosome haplogroup

I35009 G1 HR_G1_s No genetic data E1b1b1a1b1
I34297
G10 HR_G10_s U5b1b J2a1a1a2b2a3b1a1b1a2~
I34292 G11 HR_G11_s U5b1b
failed G13 HR_G13_s No genetic data
I34296 G14 HR_G14_a HV11 E1b1b1a1b1
I34301 G15 HR_G15_s No genetic data
I34298 G16 HR_G16_a No genetic data
failed G17 HR_G17_a No genetic data
I34982 G18 HR_G18_s No genetic data
I34981 G19 HR_G19_s No genetic data
I34299 G2 HR_G2_a No genetic data
I34294 G20 HR_G20_s W3a1 J2b2a1a1a1a1a1a
I33811 G3 HR_G3_a U5b1b
failed G6 HR_G6_s No genetic data
I33812 G7 HR_G7_a U1a3
I35082 G11b / No genetic data
I34287 G12 nonadult p 5 / No genetic data
I33889 G12-A1 / H35 J1a2a1a1~
failed G12-A10 / No genetic data
I34291 G12-A12 / No genetic data
I34290 G12-A13 / U8b1a1
I33885 G12-A2 / H3k
I33808 G12-A3 / H3k J2a1a1b2a1b1b2c~
failed G12-A4 / No genetic data
failed G12-A5 / No genetic data
I33888 G12-A6 / H9a J2a1a4b
I33886 G12-A7 / HV E1b1a1a1a1c1b2a2
failed G12-A9 / No genetic data
I33809 G12-S1 / HV12b1 J2a1a1a2b1b
I33893 G12-S2 / H5a3a2
I33890 G12-S3 / R0a G2a2b2a1a1b2
I33891 G12-S4 / K1c1
failed G12, A8 / No genetic data



p.s
i have to admit if the I33886 individual e1b1a-m2 dude is real and not a mistake assignment by the lab
that is unexpected and cool :cool:
i know the roman empire was mobile and people could move as soldiers, traders, slaves
to far a way provinces but still
i guess we need to wait for this paper to be published along with the bam files
 
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Wow, not a single R1b!
 
Indeed Roman, the oldest J2L70 sample published until now is from the Marche region, in central Italy and was classify as roman. Although it could also be Greek. It is true we haven't got yet an ancient Greek J2 L70, it is said ,by different sources, that soon the Reich lab will publish an ancient Greek J L70, from the Bronze age/early Iron age, as it is not yet published I can not said it for sure, but there are some other scientists that states that at least some of the J2L70 in the west were expand by Greeks. For this case you can read the study made by Andrea finocchio et Al on 2018, you can find it on the following link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945646/
That 2018 article is outdated and what is proposed is unsupported by the phylogeny of J2a-L70 and its archaeogenetic coverage. The oldest L70 in the Balkans is the Roman Era sample from Balkan Moesia, right? Wasn't that guy mostly Anatolian?
 
That 2018 article is outdated and what is proposed is unsupported by the phylogeny of J2a-L70 and its archaeogenetic coverage. The oldest L70 in the Balkans is the Roman Era sample from Balkan Moesia, right? Wasn't that guy mostly Anatolian?
I don't think that article is outdated, it analyzes ancient alleles, although is not supported by archeological samples, it has strong scientific bases. The Viminacium sample, I15517 from the Olalde paper was Western Anatolian/Aegean, mostly close to southern Italians of today, so it could also be Greek or Roman (Southern Italian/Magna Graecian), considering Viminacium was the main roman city in Moesia.
 
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Regarding the J2L70 , Genetic ID I33808, identify in Grave 12 as A3, from the paper: " Furthermore, individuals from Grave 15, Grave 16, and specific individuals from Grave12 (notably, A3 and S4) were primarily or entirely modelled with an Aegean ancestry". So a Greek/Aegean ancient path for this individual could not be dismissed, due to his autosomal inheritance
 
The yDNA haplogroups look without a doubt primarily East Mediterreanean-East Balkan and are not local Dalmatian in their origin for the most part. This kind of supports the Greek-related settlement on the island.
Yes , greek traders from the 6th century BC ...............they should have the same haplogroup of Ancona city in Italy, a Greek created city.

Dalmatian-liburnian islands populace should have indigenous I2a ( not slavic ) and G2a populace as per findings from 2020
 
Hvar was called Pharos in ancient times and its was 100% colonised by Greeks for the Aegean island of Paros
Depending on the time , the Greeks of Paros wiped out the indigenous male populace
 
Yes , greek traders from the 6th century BC ...............they should have the same haplogroup of Ancona city in Italy, a Greek created city.

Dalmatian-liburnian islands populace should have indigenous I2a ( not slavic ) and G2a populace as per findings from 2020

Can you link the study where it says Liburni might have been I2a and G2a?

I rather think that the E-V13 in Hvar is either from Liburni, Greeks or eventually Thracians moving there.
 
Wow, not a single R1b!

yes strange indeed
what is your take on I33886 (in case we are dealing here with
real e1b1a-m2 case and not mistake of the lab) ?
 
Hvar was called Pharos in ancient times and its was 100% colonised by Greeks for the Aegean island of Paros
Depending on the time , the Greeks of Paros wiped out the indigenous male populace
 

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