Celtic - Serbian parallels

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Let me say this (this discussion has been made before, many times over):

- the Atlanticist School (which seeks the origin of the Celtic languages in the Atlantic Façade) fails to explain the close relationship of the Celtic languages with the Italic languages, and also it fails to explain the absence of west-to-east movements out of the Atlantic region into Central Europe.

- the Celtic languages clearly did not originate on the Iberian penninsula, since it sported three non-IE language in Antiquity: Basque-Aquitanian, Iberian and Tartessian, as well as a non-Celtic but Indo-European language (Lusitanian).

- the Celts may not have been the first Indo-Europeans on the Iberian penninsula, either (see Lusitanians), and there is evidence for a Lusitanian substrate in Gallaecia.

- the Atlanticist School does have a point so in so far as Hallstatt and La-Tene alone do not explain the presence of Celtic languages on the Iberian penninsula. (the "Classicist" hypothesis links the spread of the Celtic languages to Hallstatt and La-Tene alone, which obviously doesn't work).

- Both the classicist and the atlanticist hypothesis fail to explain the existence of the Lepontic language (the oldest attested unambiguously Celtic language), which was a distinct Celtic language that is linked with the Golasecca Culture in northern Italy, and which in itself was an offshot of the earlier Urnfield Culture (just like Hallstatt).

- The Classicist hypothesis does have a point in so far as Hallstatt and La-Tene verymuch explain the spread of the Gaulish language (as well as it's eastern relatives - Noric and Galatian). That the Hallstatt people were Celtic-speaking furthermore explains the numerous borrowings of Celtic words into Proto-Germanic.

- My opinion is that neither the Atlantic Bronze Age nor the Urnfield Culture were linguistically homogenous, but that both regions were in parts Celtic-speaking (but also included significant areas which spoke non-Celtic, and in the case of the former, non-Indo-European languages).

- One detail frequently overlooked is the situation on the British Isles in Antiquity: first, there is the fact that there is a complete absence of non-Celtic languages on the British Isles. The second is the fact that Britain apparently was entirely P-Celtic in Antiquity. While the exact position of Pictish is uncertain, it is clear that it too was a P-Celtic language akin to Brythonic and Gaulish.
 
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Anyway, Celts and Dorians are both derived from the Urnfield culture. But Historins like Herodotus never mentions the Dorians as "Celts"

The dorians are not Celts the Dorian are the sons Hercules,

the muth of Illyrians is created by some,

plz guys don't confuse them,
search for temenides,
I am about to open a thread about them since some still believe that dorian came from Alpren,
 
Iberia and its Iberian, Tartessian, Basque, Lusitanian languages is the most unceltic part of Western Europe. BTW Archeology gives us evidence of Celtic "saturation" (I know that you Spaniards like this word taken from wikipedia) in the Alpes region before the Atlantic façade

Incorrect. Have you read the population research studies posted by Wilhelm? The Celtiberians ALONE made up 450,000 of Celts in Iberia. At high point Celtic peoples comprised up to 75% of Iberia's population. The Lusitanians were Proto-Celts and their language, at the very least, was para-Celtic. Celtic and Celtic influenced languages were spoken in about three fourths of the Iberian Peninsula at one time. Read the research and stick to the facts, please.
 
Celtic presece in parts of Iberia only that exclude the west (Lusitanian), the south (Tartessian and phoenicians), the east (Iberian), the Central-North (Basque country) while both Ireland and Britain were fully Celts like the whole Alpine region

Excuse me? The Celtici in the southwest and the Gallaecians in the NW and the Celtiberians in the central regions and the Lusitanians (who were Proto-Celts) in the west don't count? Stick to the facts and don't downplay the obvious ancient Celticity of Iberia.
 
Excuse me? The Celtici in the southwest and the Gallaecians in the NW and the Celtiberians in the central regions and the Lusitanians (who were Proto-Celts) in the west don't count? Stick to the facts and don't downplay the obvious ancient Celticity of Iberia.

This doesn't dismiss the fact that there were non celtic people in the east (iberian), in the south (tartessian, Phoenicians), in the East (Lusitanian whose language is closer to italic than Celt) in the north (basque, Aquitanian) who occupied large parts of the Peninsula. Cesar wrotte that inhabitants of Aquitania were more similar to the inhabitants of Hispania than to those of Gaul.
 
BTW the size of the area occupied by Celtiberians is smaller than that occupied by the Moors. Same can be said about the cultural influence
 
- One detail frequently overlooked is the situation on the British Isles in Antiquity: first, there is the fact that there is a complete absence of non-Celtic languages on the British Isles. The second is the fact that Britain apparently was entirely P-Celtic in Antiquity. While the exact position of Pictish is uncertain, it is clear that it too was a P-Celtic language akin to Brythonic and Gaulish.

First of all, excellent summary Taranis, I find myself agreeing with you significantly. For some reason, a strict Atlanticist interpretation has been taken in a lot of literature right now, but your comprehensive summary is the direction I think study of the spread of Celtic peoples should be going.

I've been struggling to interpret the spread of Celtic peoples into Britain, however. We have an understanding of the progression of culture like this:
-Pre-Grooved Ware: until ca. 2900 BC
-Grooved Ware: ca. 2900 BC - ca. 2300 BC
-Beaker: ca. 2300 BC - ca. 1800 BC
-ca. 1200 BC: A large migration (Celtic?)
-Iron Age Britain, more clearly Celtic: ca. 750 BC - ca. 50 AD

Where do you think the Q-Celtic peoples (assuming they came first because Q-Celtic is older than P-Celtic and it ended up in farther-away Ireland) fit in, and similarly, the P-Celtic peoples? And do you agree that Britain would have been mostly non-R1b until post-Beaker culture, indicating a spread of Celtic languages with Y-DNA R1b?
 
BTW the size of the area occupied by Celtiberians is smaller than that occupied by the Moors. Same can be said about the cultural influence


Here we go again...:rolleyes: Didn't you learn anything from the Celts in Iberia thread?
 
And do you agree that Britain would have been mostly non-R1b until post-Beaker culture, indicating a spread of Celtic languages with Y-DNA R1b?

I think that even among early western Indo European, R1b was a minority. Only one R1b among the 15 individuls tested have been found in the Urnfield site of the Lichtenstein cave (First millenium BC)
 
Incorrect. Have you read the population research studies posted by Wilhelm? The Celtiberians ALONE made up 450,000 of Celts in Iberia. At high point Celtic peoples comprised up to 75% of Iberia's population. The Lusitanians were Proto-Celts and their language, at the very least, was para-Celtic. Celtic and Celtic influenced languages were spoken in about three fourths of the Iberian Peninsula at one time. Read the research and stick to the facts, please.

Excuse me? The Celtici in the southwest and the Gallaecians in the NW and the Celtiberians in the central regions and the Lusitanians (who were Proto-Celts) in the west don't count? Stick to the facts and don't downplay the obvious ancient Celticity of Iberia.

Sorry, but you're doing generalizations here: the statement about the 70% (in area, that is) of the Iberian penninsula being Celtic or Celtic-dominated at one point only really holds true for approximately the start of the 3rd century BC. Half a millennium earlier, the situation probably was quite a bit different. Specifically, it's clear that the Celtici of the Southwest must have been relatively recent inhabitants. The original inhabitants were the Tartessians - most inscriptions are in fact from the Algarve. Likewise, Gallaecia was certainly not originally Celtic - it's population was effectively of mixed Celtic/Lusitanian stock. It's hard to say when that region became Celticized - one might speculate however it occured at the start of the iron age, but given the settlement density it stands to reason this occured significantly earlier than in the post-Tartessian region.
 
First of all, excellent summary Taranis, I find myself agreeing with you significantly. For some reason, a strict Atlanticist interpretation has been taken in a lot of literature right now, but your comprehensive summary is the direction I think study of the spread of Celtic peoples should be going.

Thanks man.

The main beef I have with the Atlanticist school is that they are ignorant of the situation in the east. We have Celtic place names as far as the Oder and the Carpathians. We have the Celtic incursion into the Balkans in the early 3rd century BC. Where did these Celts come from?

I've been struggling to interpret the spread of Celtic peoples into Britain, however. We have an understanding of the progression of culture like this:
-Pre-Grooved Ware: until ca. 2900 BC
-Grooved Ware: ca. 2900 BC - ca. 2300 BC
-Beaker: ca. 2300 BC - ca. 1800 BC
-ca. 1200 BC: A large migration (Celtic?)
-Iron Age Britain, more clearly Celtic: ca. 750 BC - ca. 50 AD

Where do you think the Q-Celtic peoples (assuming they came first because Q-Celtic is older than P-Celtic and it ended up in farther-away Ireland) fit in, and similarly, the P-Celtic peoples? And do you agree that Britain would have been mostly non-R1b until post-Beaker culture, indicating a spread of Celtic languages with Y-DNA R1b?

I have contemplated on this as well. I'm personally uncertain regarding the identification of the Beaker-Bell Culture. They are early enough to have been Indo-Europeans, but they are also too early to have been Celtic. In particular, the pattern of spread: there is the fact that Beaker-Bell extends into southern Scandianavia, as well as incorporating a huge swath of area later inhabited by other non-Celtic peoples, is a reason why I think it's unlikely that the Beaker-Bell people were Proto-Celtic.

On the flip side, there's some indications they might have been non-IE altogether: many of the aspects of Beaker-Bell are clear continuities with earlier cultures (at least in the Atlantic region), and also the latest construction phases at Stone Henge for instance fall into this phase. This really opens up the possibility that Beaker-Bell was - at least in part - a continuation of the earlier Megalithic Builder cultures and not something completely new. But, as said, I am indecisive on this.

Regarding the later events, it's conceivable for the earliest Proto-Celtic peoples to have arrived in the 13th century BC, simultaneous to the great upheavals that occur Europe-wide (in particular, the Bronze Age collapse in the eastern Mediterranean).

Otherwise, yes, Q-Celtic is the more archaic state, and it's clear that the Q-> P shift was a linguistic innovation from the east, and that both the Celts in Ireland and the Celts in Iberia were left out of this innovation.

Regarding the arrival of P-Celtic in Britain, it's difficult to say. It's possible that Britain saw two different waves of invasion - or immigration - after the 13th century BC which might have brought P-Celtic languages with them: the first is the arrival of iron-working in approximately the 8th century BC (from the Hallstatt Culture). There definitely was another movement into Britain in approximately the 3rd century BC by La-Tene Celts (the Belgae, some tribes of which were found on both sides of the Channel). It is clear however that Britain must have been P-Celtic before that, because Pytheas of Massilia already recorded the term "Pritennike" (Britain) during his journey in the 4th century BC.

In any case, we also know that the Q/P split was complete by the 6th century BC, because the Lepontic language was also P-Celtic.
 
So under the Taranis Theory, we've got something that looks like this in Britain?:
-Pre-Grooved Ware (pre-IE?): until ca. 2900 BC
-Grooved Ware (pre-IE?): ca. 2900 BC - ca. 2300 BC
-Beaker (early IE? or pre-IE?): ca. 2300 BC - ca. 1800 BC
-Wessex-culture and related (early IE? pre-Celtic?) ca. 1800 BC - ca. 1300 BC
-Q-Celtic Britain ca. 1300 BC - ca. 750 BC
-P-Celtic Britain ca. 750 BC - onward to the Anglo-Saxons
 
Sorry, but you're doing generalizations here: the statement about the 70% (in area, that is) of the Iberian penninsula being Celtic or Celtic-dominated at one point only really holds true for approximately the start of the 3rd century BC. Half a millennium earlier, the situation probably was quite a bit different. Specifically, it's clear that the Celtici of the Southwest must have been relatively recent inhabitants. The original inhabitants were the Tartessians - most inscriptions are in fact from the Algarve. Likewise, Gallaecia was certainly not originally Celtic - it's population was effectively of mixed Celtic/Lusitanian stock. It's hard to say when that region became Celticized - one might speculate however it occured at the start of the iron age, but given the settlement density it stands to reason this occured significantly earlier than in the post-Tartessian region.

My friend, didn't I say "at high point"?
 
In Slavic mythology the Zorya (alternately, Zarya, Zory, Zore = "dawn"; Zvezda, Zwezda, Danica = "star") are the three (sometimes two) guardian goddesses, known as the Auroras. They guard and watch over the doomsday hound, Simargl, who is chained to the star Polaris in the constellation Ursa Minor, the "little bear". If the chain ever breaks, the hound will devour the constellation and the universe will end. The Zorya represent the Morning Star, Evening Star, and Midnight Star, respectively,[1] although the Midnight Star is sometimes omitted. As a trio, they are sometimes associated with the Triple Goddess mythic archetype, representing the maiden, mother and crone.
The Zorya serve the sun god Dažbog, who in some myths is described as their father. Zorya Utrennyaya, the Morning Star, opens the gates to his palace every morning for the sun-chariot's departure. At dusk, Zorya Vechernyaya—the Evening Star—closes the palace gates once more after his return. Zorya Polunochnaya, the Midnight Star, holds the dying sun in her arms until he is restored to life the following morning. The three goddesses are also associated with marriage, protection, and exorcisms.
The home of the Zorya was sometimes said to be on Bouyan (or Buyan), an oceanic island paradise where the Sun dwelt along with his attendants, the North, West and East winds.
[2]
....
In some myths, she is described as the wife of Perun and would accompany her husband into battle.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Zorya
In Irish mythology, Brigit or Brighid ("exalted one"[1]) was the daughter of the Dagda and one of the Tuatha Dé Danann. She was the wife of Bres of the Fomorians, with whom she had a son, Ruadán.
She had two sisters, also named Brighid, and is considered "a classic Celtic Triple Goddess".[
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brighid
Goibniu, Creidhne and Luchta are referred to as Trí Dé Dána ("three gods of craftsmanship"), and the Dagda's name is interpreted in medieval texts as "the good god."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuatha_Dé_Danann

In Irish mythology, Credne (Old Irish) or Creidhne (Modern Irish – pronounced creynya) was a son of Brigid and Tuireann and the artificer of the Tuatha Dé Danann, working in bronze, brass and gold. He and his brothers Goibniu and Luchtaine were known as the Trí Dée Dána, the three gods of art, who forged the weapons which the Tuatha Dé used to battle the Fomorians.[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creidhne


In Celtic religion and Irish mythology, Brigit or Brighid ("exalted one"[1]) is the daughter of the Dagda and one of the Tuatha Dé Danann. She was the wife of Bres of the Fomorians, with whom she had a son, Ruadán.

She had two sisters, also named Brighid, and is considered "a classic Celtic Triple Goddess
"
The Dagda (Proto-Celtic: *Dagodeiwos, Old Irish: Dag Dia, Modern Irish: Daghdha) is an important god of Irish mythology. The Dagda is a father-figure (he is also known as Eochaid(h) Ollathair, or "All-father") and a protector of the tribe. In some texts his father is Elatha, in others his mother is Ethniu. Other texts say that his mother is Danu; while others yet place him as the father of Danu, perhaps due to her association with Brigit.
...
His lover was Boann and his daughter was Breg.
1) Brighid/Brigit/Breg is also known as Dana
Zorya is also known as Dana

2) Zorya = dawn, Dan = day in Slavic
*bārego- (??) = dawn in proto-Celtic
http://www.utoronto.ca/elul/English/218/PVL-selections.pdf

3) Zorya's home is Bouyan
Brighid's mother is Boann

4) Brighid is tripple godess
Zorya is tripple goddess

5) Zorya's father is Dajbog/Dažbog (bog = god)
Brighid's father is Dagda (da = god)

6) in some myths Zorya's husband = Perun
in some myths Brighid's husband = Tuireann
 
wow well come back man
 
wow well come back man

And yet he still has no understanding of linguistics, because everything he says is based on superficial similarities:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Zorya
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brighid

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuatha_Dé_Danann

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creidhne

1) Brighid/Brigit/Breg is also known as Dana
Zorya is also known as Dana

2) Zorya = dawn, Dan = day in Slavic
*bārego- (??) = dawn in proto-Celtic
http://www.utoronto.ca/elul/English/218/PVL-selections.pdf

3) Zorya's home is Bouyan
Brighid's mother is Boann

4) Brighid is tripple godess
Zorya is tripple goddess

5) Zorya's father is Dajbog/Dažbog (bog = god)
Brighid's father is Dagda (da = god)

6) in some myths Zorya's husband = Perun
in some myths Brighid's husband = Tuireann

- Brighid is derived from PIE *bhereg´h meaning "high, noble". She is found under the name "Brigantia" across the ancient Celtic world ("Brigantes" tribe in northern England, town names "Brigantium" in Austria, the western Alps in Galicia).

- Boann is derived from "white cow" (Proto-Celtic *bou-winda)

- Female triple deities occur in Irish mythology, the most common combination being Morrigan, Macha, and Badb Catha. Brighid is normally not part of them. Examples of such triple deities occur in other Indo-European mythologies: Greek Moirae, Roman Parcae, Germanic Norns.

- Danu is an Indo-European river/mother goddess found both in Celtic and in Hindu mythology. It is clearly unrelated with the Slavic word for day, and a connection with Zorya (or with "Danitsa") is completely spurious.

- Dagda is derived from earlier *Dagodeiwos (as you wrote above), meaning 'good god'. Dagda is also known as "Ollathair"
- Dajbog is derived from Proto-Slavic *dati- (to give, compare with Latin "dare", Greek "dosis") and PIE *bhag- (to divide, compare Sanskrit "bhajati" - "to distribute"). Dajbog is thus the "giving god" or possibly, the "giver of wealth".

- Perun is derived from PIE *perkwus (oak)
- Tuireann is derived from Proto-Celtic *torano- (to thunder)

As you can see, cross-connections and parallels between various Indo-European pantheons exist and it should be hardly surprising that they exist, but not in this way, because the etymologies are clearly very different ones.
 
Yetos:
wow well come back man​

thanks :)


And yet he still has no understanding of linguistics, because everything he says is based on superficial similarities:- Brighid is derived from PIE *bhereg´h meaning "high, noble". She is found under the name "Brigantia" across the ancient Celtic world ("Brigantes" tribe in northern England, town names "Brigantium" in Austria, the western Alps in Galicia). - Boann is derived from "white cow" (Proto-Celtic *bou-winda)- Female triple deities occur in Irish mythology, the most common combination being Morrigan, Macha, and Badb Catha. Brighid is normally not part of them. Examples of such triple deities occur in other Indo-European mythologies: Greek Moirae, Roman Parcae, Germanic Norns.- Danu is an Indo-European river/mother goddess found both in Celtic and in Hindu mythology. It is clearly unrelated with the Slavic word for day, and a connection with Zorya (or with "Danitsa") is completely spurious.- Dagda is derived from earlier *Dagodeiwos (as you wrote above), meaning 'good god'. Dagda is also known as "Ollathair"- Dajbog is derived from Proto-Slavic *dati- (to give, compare with Latin "dare", Greek "dosis") and PIE *bhag- (to divide, compare Sanskrit "bhajati" - "to distribute"). Dajbog is thus the "giving god" or possibly, the "giver of wealth".- Perun is derived from PIE *perkwus (oak)- Tuireann is derived from Proto-Celtic *torano- (to thunder)As you can see, cross-connections and parallels between various Indo-European pantheons exist and it should be hardly surprising that they exist, but not in this way, because the etymologies are clearly very different ones.

I have no clue how can you be so blindly believing in what you read...

all the interpretations that you mention are just ideas and theories of various linguists and historians who have recently studied origin of those names...

just theories, same as what I wrote is just a theory....albeit different one...it may be right, or it may be wrong....


to my viewpoint there are too many connections to completely discard them.... especially in a way you do it... like an angry teacher... don't you ever ask yourself "what if"...

in fact, let me point out only possible origin of this obvious link...it is PIE peoplewhen they mixed in various other people what of course happened is that the meaning of their deities were sometimes translated, sometimes interpreted with a new meaning....


but curiosity for me is that these are deities of tribes of Tuatha Dé Danann while tripple goddes Zorya (dawn in english) whose alternative name is Danica, I have explained as origin of name Zoryani/Zeruiani/Serians....

in fact, even in ancient Greece, we have triple godess Hecate (ancient Greek Ἑκάτη ) and somewhat similar tribal name for Dannans - Akhaioí

The Achaeans (Greek: Ἀχαιοί, Akhaioí) is one of the collective names used for the Greeks in Homer's Iliad (used 598 times) and Odyssey. The other names are theDanaans (Δαναοί, used 138 times in the Iliad) and Argives (Ἀργεῖοι, used 29 times in the Iliad).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achaeans_(Homer)

note that Celtic tribe Brigantes we also find in Balkans and later in Asia Minor as Phrygians...

I find those links very interesting and worth exploring... maybe they can lead to identifying PIE people who spread their language and religion across Euro-Asia


- Brighid is derived from PIE *bhereg´h meaning "high, noble". She is found under the name "Brigantia" across the ancient Celtic world ("Brigantes" tribe in northern England, town names "Brigantium" in Austria, the western Alps in Galicia).

that is an assumption made in lack of better theory...

*bārego- (??) = dawn is much more likely name for a goddess, as
"high/noble" implies other deities are not high and noble...

it would be blasphemy to give such a name to single deity in large pantheon....

while name such as "dawn" would be very natural...

- Perun is derived from PIE *perkwus (oak)- Tuireann is derived from Proto-Celtic *torano- (to thunder)

Perun is the God whose weapon is thunder.. in fact, same god as Taranis and Thor....oak is also symbol of same deity


In Norse mythology, Thor (from Old Norse Þórr) is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing, healing, and fertility.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thor


*Perkwunos, known as the "striker," is reconstructed[8] from Sanskrit Parjanya, Prussian Perkuns, Lithuanian Perkūnas, Latvian Pērkons, Slavic Perun and NorseFjörgyn. Fjörgyn was replaced by Thor among the Germanic speaking peoples. These gods give their names to Thursday, the fifth day of the week, throughcalqueing. The Celtic hammer god Sucellus is of the same character, but with an unrelated name.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo-European_religion


but question is could legend of deity Tuireann of tribe Tuatha Dé Danann have been of same origin as Taranis of later Celtic people...


- Danu is an Indo-European river/mother goddess found both in Celtic and in Hindu mythology. It is clearly unrelated with the Slavic word for day, and a connection with Zorya (or with "Danitsa") is completely spurious.

well, it is not spurious...

*Deh[SUB]2[/SUB]nu- 'River goddess' is reconstructed (Mallory & Adams 2006, p. 434) from Sanskrit Danu, Irish Danu; Welsh Dôn, and a masc. form Ossetic Donbettys. The name has been connected with the Dan rivers which run into the Black Sea (Dnieper, Dniester, Don, and Danube) and other river names in Celtic areas.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo-European_religion

note that area around Dnieper, Dniester, Don and Danube is considered to be birth place of early Slavs...

i think it is same goddess, as one of the forms of Zorya triple goddess is mother...

and Zorya is related to river... river of healing

In some tales, she sits under the World Tree on the fiery-stone Alatuir, from which run the four rivers of the Otherworld, and under her seat flows the river of healing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zorya


Zorica and DanicaThese names mean simply Dawn and Daystar, but in folklore accounts of all Slavic nations, they are often described as persons, or associated with persons, in pretty much the same way as Sun and Moon. Danica is often called Sun's younger sister or daughter, and was probably associated with Morana. Consequently, Zorica was either Sun's mother or older sister. It is quite possible this was a Slavic relic of the Proto-Indo-European dawn god.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_mythology



note also that
Zaria or Zoria is the goddess of beauty in Slavic mythology.[1] A once-popular goddess also associated with the morning, Zaria was known to her worshippers as "the heavenly bride." She was greeted at dawn as "the brightest maiden, pure, sublime, honorable." She was also known as a water priestess that protected warriors.[2]Zarya (заря) is the Russian word for "sunrise," or "morning star."[3]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zaria_(goddess)


Boann is derived from "white cow" (Proto-Celtic *bou-winda)

assumption...

can you explain rules that can transform: bou + winda to boann

I don't think you can... i think it was just wild guess of some linguist...

Boann or Boand (modern spelling: Bóinn) is the Irish mythology goddess of the River Boyne, a river in Leinster, Ireland. According to the Lebor Gabála Érenn she was the daughter of Delbáeth, son of Elada, of the Tuatha Dé Danann.[1] Her husband is variously Nechtan, Elcmar or Nuada. Her lover is theDagda, by whom she had her son, Aengus. In order to hide their affair, the Dagda made the sun stand still for nine months; therefore, Aengus was conceived, gestated and born in one day.[2]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boann

let's look for parallels

Dagda created sun

Dažbog - Sun god, possibly a culture hero and a source of wealth and power

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_deities


perhaps coincidence, but river Bojana also exists in Montenegro and north Albania
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bojana_(river)
 
some more ideas:

The home of the Zorya was sometimes said to be on Bouyan (or Buyan), an oceanic island paradise where the Sun dwelt along with his attendants, the North, West and East winds.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Zorya

Boann or Boand (modern spelling: Bóinn) is the Irish mythology goddess of the River Boyne, a river in Leinster, Ireland. According to the Lebor Gabála Érenn she was the daughter of Delbáeth, son of Elada, of the Tuatha Dé Danann.[1] Her husband is variously Nechtan, Elcmar or Nuada. Her lover is the Dagda, by whom she had her son, Aengus. In order to hide their affair, the Dagda made the sun stand still for nine months; therefore, Aengus was conceived, gestated and born in one day.[2]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boann

Boann is paradise island in one mythology, and river in othercan we explain it?river and island can be related... e.g. river Bojana (Albanian: Bunë or Buna ) starts its voyage from Skadar lake and goes into Adriatic sea...river Bojana on its entrance to Adriatic sea splits in two and creates island "ada Bojana"... however the island as it is now is believed to came into existence only in 17th century when two smaller islands were connected due to a boat sinking in area between them....
260px-Buna-muendung.jpg


[url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bojana_(river)
[/URL]

Boann is artifically made river

As told in the metrical Dindshenchas,[3] Boann created the River Boyne. Though forbidden to by her husband, Nechtan, Boann approached the magical well of Segais (also known as the Well of Wisdom), which was surrounded by hazel trees. Nuts from the hazels were known to fall into the well, where they were eaten by the speckled salmon (who, along with hazel nuts, also embody and represent wisdom in Irish myth). Boann challenged the power of the well by walking around it counter-clockwise; this caused the waters to surge up violently and rush down to the sea, creating the River Boyne. In this catastrophe, she was swept along in the rushing waters, and lost an arm, leg and eye, and ultimately her life, in the flood. The poem equates her with famous rivers in other countries, including the Severn, Tiber, Jordan, Tigris and Euphrates.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boann


1) river Bojana flows out of Skadar lake to Adriatic sea river Boann flows out of magical well Segais to the sea

2) in mythology river Boann was artificially created it is easy to conceive that river Bojana was as well artificially created by creating initial path from lake that is above sea level downwards...

could it be that these links are about mythology of a tribe who first lived in Balkan and than part of it moved to Ireland?

what comes to my mind are Chelidoni and Bryges / Brigantes...both lived near lake Skadar and river Bojana..
Map_of_ancient_Epirus_and_environs.png

perhaps I2a2-Isles origins from early split of Balkan tribe Bryges that settled UK as Brigantes
Brigantes
250px-Map_of_the_Territory_of_the_Brigantes.svg.png
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigantes


Keltoi_Tribes.PNG


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darini


remnantpoints.gif


http://www.eupedia.com/forum/showthread.php?26944-The-Paleolithic-Remnants-a-map

Bryges also settled Phrygia in Asia minor
Haplogroup_I2a.gif
http://www.eupedia.com/forum/showthread.php?25689-New-haplogroup-I2a-map

800px-Anatolia_Ancient_Regions_base.svg.png
 

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So by what I understand How yes No you are supporting the Idea that Bryges were Celts
the Briganti tribe or relative to them,
that means you exclude the Burgundi theory for Bryges, and you Bring South Thracian more close to Celtic than Germanic and Slavic.
is that that point and conclusion?
 
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