Films & Series Favorite Historical Movies

Life and Death in Herculaneum. In many aspects more interesting and better preserved than Pompeii.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzqDDP1M8ko

Thanks...I don't know how I missed this one.

Very moving picture of the humaneness of the people of Herculaneum, contrary to the lame comments of a youtube poster. (is that sort of redundant?) The two year old boy clutching his dog, the two women cradling the little girl with the silver hoop ear-rings, and the men guiding their women to what they hoped would be safety while braving the elements themselves all really got to me.

It's also a lesson in how very wrong historians, archaeologists, and probably even, yes, geneticists, can be so total wrong. I argued vehemently with someone once that it was incomprehensible to me that a population living on the sea or so close to areas where even today hunting is ubiquitous would have subsisted on a mainly grains, fruit and vegetable diet. And here is the proof that, indeed, people in the Roman world, even humble people, had a very varied diet. The same kinds of proof are showing up in results from Roman military camps in Britain.

For that matter, whole landscapes must have been deforested to produce the reams of paper that have been dedicated to the now obviously incorrect theory that the ancient Greeks and Romans chose to leave their marble statues white because of some aesthetic choice, or that their buildings were some monument to the purity of white marble.

The Parthenon as it probably actually appeared:
http://www.midwestmodel.com/pagesro...10&Category=models&CategoryId=2&ProjectId=352

I couldn't find a really good virtual reality clip for Herculaneum, but this short one of a home in Pompeii is lovely:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfG2Eb4hcik
 
Thanks...I don't know how I missed this one.

Very moving picture of the humaneness of the people of Herculaneum, contrary to the lame comments of a youtube poster. (is that sort of redundant?) The two year old boy clutching his dog, the two women cradling the little girl with the silver hoop ear-rings, and the men guiding their women to what they hoped would be safety while braving the elements themselves all really got to me.
I'm glad they didn't narrate it for too long, my heart was getting weird (for a man) and I started rubbing my eyes. :crying:

It's also a lesson in how very wrong historians, archaeologists, and probably even, yes, geneticists, can be so total wrong. I argued vehemently with someone once that it was incomprehensible to me that a population living on the sea or so close to areas where even today hunting is ubiquitous would have subsisted on a mainly grains, fruit and vegetable diet. And here is the proof that, indeed, people in the Roman world, even humble people, had a very varied diet. The same kinds of proof are showing up in results from Roman military camps in Britain.
Seems like coastal people had always much better diet.

For that matter, whole landscapes must have been deforested to produce the reams of paper that have been dedicated to the now obviously incorrect theory that the ancient Greeks and Romans chose to leave their marble statues white because of some aesthetic choice, or that their buildings were some monument to the purity of white marble.
I must say I was nicely surprised.

I couldn't find a really good virtual reality clip for Herculaneum, but this short one of a home in Pompeii is lovely:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfG2Eb4hcik
Just connect it to electrical grid and I'm ready to move in, lol.

I was hugely surprised how sophisticated plumbing was. And it was real plumbing made of lead, plumbium. Well not very healthy by our modern standards but amazing technology nevertheless.

Other thing what hit me is the amount of freed slaves, who became citizens and then some of them made a fortune and build great villas in the city. Makes me think that Rome had a vibe of "American Dream" sort of place, from rugs to riches.
 
Mel Gibson has had a few mentions on this thread... but if we're talking about historical movies I'm surprised nobody picked Braveheart.

On a serious note... these aren't movies, but anything by Lindybeige on youtube is usually pretty entertaining (and accurate). Also Joe Rogan's podcast has some interesting guests (Graham Hancock is refreshingly out-of-the-box) that talk about history and genetics-- also found on youtube.
 
...and also this stuff about extraterrestrials; a true eye opener!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IABsBprJJPo

Got a chuckle out of this... I must say I've been going Rainman on pre-historic megalithic structures and some are so difficult to explain away-- the easy option is to punt and pin it on alien technology. Sacsayhuaman in Peru has me especially stumped. But I'm not giving up on the genius of mankind yet!

And the altered head shape thing he mentioned in that clip is also really weird. It's found throughout the globe and through many civilizations... maybe moulding craniums gave some of the ancients a leg up in the intelligence department?
 
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...Also Joe Rogan's podcast has some interesting guests (Graham Hancock is refreshingly out-of-the-box)...

Not that I agree with Graham. I completely diverge from his fundamental beliefs. Not sure if I should admire his bravery (by using the planet's most powerful hallucinigens to chase what he sees as the truth) or if I should condemn his foolish methods and conclusions.
 
Mel Gibson has had a few mentions on this thread... but if we're talking about historical movies I'm surprised nobody picked Braveheart.

Well, setting aside the fact it was not historically accurate, I like Braveheart as a movie, nordicquarreler. Never yet been able to watch the end however..
 
Thanks, loved that. Interesting, good quality, full of knowledge.

Yes, loads of little bits of information not usually covered in other items. Glad you enjoyed it.
 
Well, setting aside the fact it was not historically accurate, I like Braveheart as a movie, nordicquarreler. Never yet been able to watch the end however..

Wait a minute, Braveheart wasn't historically accurate? How so?

Kidding. That's why I put "on a serious note" in that comment...
 
Wait a minute, Braveheart wasn't historically accurate? How so?

Kidding. That's why I put "on a serious note" in that comment...

I thought that might have been the case...just as I hit "post reply", lol.
It`s a good movie regardless...even if I don`t make it to the end.:)
 
Ascent of Money by Niall Ferguson.
Absolutely well written and narrated by this great historian of finance. 5 stars.

 
The Creature from Jekyll Island:

Wonder if 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde' comes from.


The inception of the Federal Reserve System

This video explains the normal banks expand the money supply by 1:10.

The big banks (Wall Street) that own the Federal Reserve System follow the Net Capital Rule (which could change - it was the change to 1:33 ratio by chairman of Goldman Sachs at the time Henry Paulson later US Treasury secretary) that brought the 2007 recession) with expansion ratio is 1:17 to get into exploration for resources for oil, minerals mergers and acquisitions. i.e. hedge funds.
 
I find this funny:

How Socialism, Communism and Fascism are all the Same

 
Fractional reserve banking:

 
pearl harbor ;)
 
The Colosseum-Engineering and Gladitorial Combat-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1bZuVdfP7I

Perhaps a better one on the actual engineering, National Geographic-Ancient Megastructures-The Colosseum
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAnVA4_xhTk

Basically Hollywood gets it wrong, at least as far as the combats are concerned. In The Gladiator they seem to have gotten the engineering of the sub-regions right, however.

The Seven Wonders of Ancient Rome: The Pantheon, The Forum, The Circus Maximus, The Colosseum, The Aqueducts, The Roads, The Baths of Caracalla.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8wjVAUXvDQ

Roman Engineering-Aqueducts (I really liked this one)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FN1v5FYkTLQ

The Roman Baths-NOVA reconstructs one, but doesn't do as good a job as the Romans did!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKBc3_fKHtA

That video, while good for the technical aspects, doesn't do the Roman baths justice.
This is a virtual tour of the Baths of Caracalla:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejxVEbOba2g

This is a particularly good virtual tour of a Roman house:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDiqKUzSeZM

A virtual tour of an Insula, an apartment building for lower class people:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIWQvdZdaAA

A Virtual Tour of the City of Rome from the Khan Academy, which does excellent work.
The professor does a particularly good job, imo, of describing why the Pantheon is such an awe inspiring building...my favorite building in the world, and one I go to every time I am in Rome.

These may have been posted elsewhere but I couldn't find them through a search:
 

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