Greatest Spanish contribution(s) to the world ?

What is/are the greatest Spanish contribution(s) to the world?

  • Spanish food (tapas, paella, tortilla, Iberian pork, churros, etc.)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The classical guitar

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Spanish painting (Goya, Velásquez, Dali, Picasso, Miro, etc.)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The invention of cigarettes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The epidural analgesia

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Other (please specify)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
Sorry just I miss lynxs...Don't get mad and get back to debate with your primal name. Here I go, cigarretes weren't invented by spaniards, were invented by...guess what...were invented by nativeamericans. Can you see? there's a lot of topic on you're lying. Come on get back as lynxs

Cigarros were amerindian, taínos to be more precise (I don't remember well, but I think they called them cohiba). But cigarrettes -tobacco inside a paper- are probably a spanish invention. Cigarro is not the same as cigarrette.
 
Sorry just I miss lynxs...Don't get mad and get back to debate with your primal name. Here I go, cigarretes weren't invented by spaniards, were invented by...guess what...were invented by nativeamericans. Can you see? there's a lot of topic on you're lying. Come on get back as lynxs

Similar situation as guitars... modern cigarettes, with paper wrapping, were developed by Spaniards, even though the original thing came from elsewhere (in this case, the Americas).

Edit: whoops, didn't see that Segia had gotten to it before me.
 
To Brady and all his many fabricated characters:

You are aware that you're a laughing stock on several forums, yes? A mountebank pathologically obsessed with Spaniards. An equivocator and inveterate teller of non-truths and assorted codswallop. You are now in the same internet junk pile as other infamous charlatans, such as Napoli Nordic and Loyalist. The only explanation for your bizarre behavior is that you have masochistic propensities. Seriously, you really, really, really need to seek professional counseling.
 
Similar situation as guitars... modern cigarettes, with paper wrapping, were developed by Spaniards, even though the original thing came from elsewhere (in this case, the Americas).

Edit: whoops, didn't see that Segia had gotten to it before me.

Totally agree, clocks were invented by arabs and cigarretes by nativeamericans. Best regards.
 
Another Spanish invention rather than benefit the world.


The invention of Sanchez-Ramos is an authentication system of people in the highest reliability, because it identifies the distinguishing features of the eyes of individuals. For this picture several times the cornea of the person whose identity you want to check and then compares a thousand different points with another previously recorded image. The result improves previous other biometrics such as fingerprint and iris analysis, because the new method allows the observation of the inner surface of the cornea, which is not replicable.
 
Apologies if this has already been mentioned.

The first literary description of a time machine

"The HG Wells tale of a Victorian gentleman who voyaged through time on a time machine of his own invention was the one that captured the public's imagination - but it was not the first of its kind. The novel was published in Spain in 1897, beating HG Wells' The Time Machine into print by more than seven years." source

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Similar situation as guitars... modern cigarettes, with paper wrapping, were developed by Spaniards, even though the original thing came from elsewhere (in this case, the Americas).

Edit: whoops, didn't see that Segia had gotten to it before me.

A guitar is not a sitar or a laud, is a guitar, instrument born in Spain.
 
A guitar is not a sitar or a laud, is a guitar, instrument born in Spain.

The complications regarding whether or not the guitar was actually invented in Spain have already been discussed. Some of the ambiguity results from the changing meaning of the word "guitar," which probably originally included gitterns. So either guitars were originally brought to Spain by the Moors, or guitars are a Spanish innovation off of a Moorish instrument.

Either way, modern classical guitars were invented by Antonio de Torres Jurado, so I think it is fair to say that the development of the classical guitar was a great Spanish contribution.
 
The complications regarding whether or not the guitar was actually invented in Spain have already been discussed. Some of the ambiguity results from the changing meaning of the word "guitar," which probably originally included gitterns. So either guitars were originally brought to Spain by the Moors, or guitars are a Spanish innovation off of a Moorish instrument.

Either way, modern classical guitars were invented by Antonio de Torres Jurado, so I think it is fair to say that the development of the classical guitar was a great Spanish contribution.

Thanks for the info, another hypothesis is that descends from the zither and was introduced by the Romans; maybe the zither and lute are related also. To me, it's more like the lute, but i´m not a expert.
 
The two main reasons why former Spanish colonies have a greater percentage of people of Amerindian descent are :

1) The only two big and populous pre-Columbian empires in the Americas, the Aztec and Inca empires, became Spanish colonies. Their population densities contrast sharply with that of the nomadic tribes of North America. Nomadic hunter-gatherers just cannot sustain big populations.

Compare now the size of what became the United States with the size of what became Mexico and Peru. Even if it was more sparsely populated, the huge size of it compensates.


If you think that today's difference of percentage between Amerindians and other US citizens is solely due to massacres, you are badly deluded.

If you think that this percentage would not be quite different today had not those massacres and segregation of survivors happened you are the one who is badly deluded.

2) In the first century of colonisation, the Spanish massacred or enslaved a lot of Amerindian men, while marrying, having sex with or raping the native women. It didn't happen everywhere, but the practice was widespread enough for the population of many Latin American countries to become mostly mestizos.

Unfortunately for your arguments, we have censuses from the times when these countries were still under Spanish control, and they show that Amerindians were in fact the majority of the population. In the last Spanish census of Mexico (1810, almost 300 years after the conquest), for example, Amerindians still made up at least 60% of the population.

Plus you are taking modern censuses of these countries at face value, when it's well-known that many acculturated Amerindians pass as "Mestizo" (this goes back to even the times when Spain still controlled these nations.) Read up on the topic of acculturation and "cultural Mestizos". Amerindians are certainly more common than the "official" numbers show.

About 80% of Mexicans are also mestizos, while approximately 10% are "fairly pure" White Europeans and 10% are Amerindians.

That study was based on "300 mestizos in the Mexican population." What other results did they expect to find by studying only "Mestizos"?

If the Y-chromosomes and mtDNA were balanced between European and Amerindian types, we could assume that the two ethnic groups mixed peacefully with each others. However, the absolute dominance of Spanish paternal lineages and Amerindian maternal lineages leaves no doubt that the process was a violent one which eliminated male Amerindians from the equation.

Supposing that what you claim is true, that would still hardly be the only conclusion that can be reached. Most of the people Spain sent to the New World were soldiers and priests (i.e. they were men.) Spain seldom sent women to its possessions. It's only natural that sooner or later the soldiers who permanently settled in those lands would intermarry with the local women. It doesn't necessarily imply it has anything to do with a "violent process". The majority of Amerindian casualties during the first centuries of "contact" were because of disease, not war. After these countries became independent from Spain the "Mestizo" populations increased (as shown from the Spanish censuses.)

Incidentally, I am not American, nor British, nor French, nor Dutch. I have no reason by my nationality to be more biased towards the Spanish or the French or the British or the Americans in this argument. My country didn't have any colonies in the Americas either. I am commenting it from a detached and neutral point of view.


You don't have to be from a country that was a former "rival" of Spain to uncritically accept the "black legend". Lots of people who have nothing to do with those countries actually believe it. Those rival nations made quite sure to spread this false image of Spain and its supposed "atrocities" in the New World. Which legend, I repeat, has been aptly criticized by modern scholars as hypocritical, considering that the nations who spread this propaganda weren't exactly "saints" themselves, and in fact were actually worse for the native populations than the Spanish were.
 
Incidentally, I am not American, nor British, nor French, nor Dutch. I have no reason by my nationality to be more biased towards the Spanish or the French or the British or the Americans in this argument. My country didn't have any colonies in the Americas either. I am commenting it from a detached and neutral point of view.
No, but your country is also a hotspot of the spanish black legend. Your country became part of the Spanish Empire in the XVth century, includes Flanders. There were some spanish battles there, with our Tercios.
 
Yeah, I don't know what my life would be without it. :rolleyes:


For you in particular might not, but for fans of personal watercraft is everything.
 
Another interesting Spanish invention: the semi-automatic pistol

"The earliest specimen of a partly automatic pistol appears to be a revolver invented in 1863 by Orbea, of Eibar. In the specimen preserved in the Museo de Armeria, at Eibar, it is a simple solid-frame revolver of .450 calibre possessing an attachment to the barrel so arranged that a piston actuated by the powder gas ejected the empty case of the previous round from the chamber." ("Textbook of small arms", Great Britain War Office, 1929. Page 96.)


"The development of the automatic (self-loading) pistol, is best described by referring to a few individual models. A claimant to being the first to design a gas-operated automatic is a Spanish gunmaker, Orbea, who at Eibar in 1863 invented a gun (shown below) similar to a revolver. When it was fired, a fitting on the barrel trapped some of the gas and used it to force back a piston which ejected the spent cartridge of the previous round." (Dudley Pope, "Guns: from the invention of gunpowder to the 20th century", page 198)

I have attached a scan of the picture of this pioneering gun, found in Pope's book.
 

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Well, another spanish invention :

Transporter Bridge

26_07_2004.jpg
 
Another interesting Spanish invention: the semi-automatic pistol

"The earliest specimen of a partly automatic pistol appears to be a revolver invented in 1863 by Orbea, of Eibar. In the specimen preserved in the Museo de Armeria, at Eibar, it is a simple solid-frame revolver of .450 calibre possessing an attachment to the barrel so arranged that a piston actuated by the powder gas ejected the empty case of the previous round from the chamber." ("Textbook of small arms", Great Britain War Office, 1929. Page 96.)


"The development of the automatic (self-loading) pistol, is best described by referring to a few individual models. A claimant to being the first to design a gas-operated automatic is a Spanish gunmaker, Orbea, who at Eibar in 1863 invented a gun (shown below) similar to a revolver. When it was fired, a fitting on the barrel trapped some of the gas and used it to force back a piston which ejected the spent cartridge of the previous round." (Dudley Pope, "Guns: from the invention of gunpowder to the 20th century", page 198)

I have attached a scan of the picture of this pioneering gun, found in Pope's book.

Wow, I am impressed. I had always thought that Webley was the first company to have a semi-auto revolver.
Good post.
 

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