Investigations at Warsaw Ghetto

Angela

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I've always been fascinated by the fact that there was a concerted and organized effort by the people in the ghetto to memorialize for history the events unfolding there. Some were diaries, others collections of decrees etc. When it was clear the end was near, the written evidence was divided and hidden at various places in the ghetto. The locations were known to those who might make it out of the ghetto. After the war many of the caches were indeed recovered, but not all. I'm so glad some more have been found.

It's one of the most moving aspects of the Holocaust to my mind. On the one hand it is indeed a reminder that they are people of the book, the written word. On the other hand it points to a more universal truth about human nature: the desire that the truth not be forgotten, that history record that truth.

There's a wonderful book about the project called: Notes From The Warsaw Ghetto: The Journal of Emmanuel Ringelblum. Ringelblum chronicled whatever news seeped in from the different cities and ghettos as well as what went on within Warsaw. It's always reminded me of the Jewish scholars chronicling their Babylonian Captivity.

John Hersey wrote a fictionalized version called "The Wall", and there's also a mass market much more fictionalized "hero" version, which I nevertheless liked called Mila 13.

See: Archaeology news:
[h=1]"WARSAW, POLAND—Notes from Poland reports that archaeologists working in the Warsaw ghetto have uncovered children’s shoes, tableware, ceramic tiles, diary pages, burned books, and book pages written in Hebrew and Polish. Established by the Nazis in 1940, an estimated 460,000 Jews were held captive in the ghetto, an area covering just 1.3 square miles. Researchers led by Jacek Konik of the Warsaw Ghetto Museum have been investigating an area near a memorial mound named for Mordechai Anielewicz, head of the Jewish Combat Organization, which was based nearby at 18 Miła Street. Anielewicz is thought to have died at the site in May 1943 during an uprising triggered by the deportation of many of the captives to death camps. “It was here that the soldiers of the Jewish Combat Organization, surrounded by the Germans, probably committed mass suicide,” Konik said. The Nazis demolished the Warsaw ghetto after the uprising."[/h]

 
See:

I've always been fascinated by the fact that there was a concerted and organized effort by the people in the ghetto to memorialize for history the events unfolding there. Some were diaries, others collections of decrees etc. When it was clear the end was near, the written evidence was divided and hidden at various places in the ghetto. The locations were known to those who might make it out of the ghetto. After the war many of the caches were indeed recovered, but not all. I'm so glad some more have been found.

It's one of the most moving aspects of the Holocaust to my mind. On the one hand it is indeed a reminder that they are people of the book, the written word. On the other hand it points to a more universal truth about human nature: the desire that the truth not be forgotten, that history record that truth.

There's a wonderful book about the project called: Notes From The Warsaw Ghetto: The Journal of Emmanuel Ringelblum. Ringelblum chronicled whatever news seeped in from the different cities and ghettos as well as what went on within Warsaw. It's always reminded me of the Jewish scholars chronicling their Babylonian Captivity.

John Hersey wrote a fictionalized version called "The Wall", and there's also a mass market much more fictionalized "hero" version, which I nevertheless liked called Mila 13.

See: Archaeology news:
"WARSAW, POLAND—Notes from Poland reports that archaeologists working in the Warsaw ghetto have uncovered children’s shoes, tableware, ceramic tiles, diary pages, burned books, and book pages written in Hebrew and Polish. Established by the Nazis in 1940, an estimated 460,000 Jews were held captive in the ghetto, an area covering just 1.3 square miles. Researchers led by Jacek Konik of the Warsaw Ghetto Museum have been investigating an area near a memorial mound named for Mordechai Anielewicz, head of the Jewish Combat Organization, which was based nearby at 18 Miła Street. Anielewicz is thought to have died at the site in May 1943 during an uprising triggered by the deportation of many of the captives to death camps. “It was here that the soldiers of the Jewish Combat Organization, surrounded by the Germans, probably committed mass suicide,” Konik said. The Nazis demolished the Warsaw ghetto after the uprising."





horrible
my ashkenazi granny named ruth
was born in the year 1939 ( what a year)
lucky for her in scotland
if she would have been born were her ashkenazi ancestors
came to scotland like lithaunia and ukraine
i doubt she would survived the nazi machine
and i wouldn't be talking here today
 

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