Oldest continuously inhabited cities

Angela

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since when was Jericho inhabited continualy?
in the neolithic it was abondonned and resettled
so, Tell Aswad (Damascus) may come before Jericho
 
since when was Jericho inhabited continualy?
in the neolithic it was abondonned and resettled
so, Tell Aswad (Damascus) may come before Jericho

There are at least 20 layers at Jericho. I'm sure some time passed in between rebuilding the various "cities" of each layer and I'm sure that's true of a lot of the other listed sites as well.
 
Add Sofia, Bulgaria. The earliest archaeological evidence of the occupation of the territory of Sofia is from the early Neolithic (VI millennium BC) - among them is the Slatina Neolithic settlement. The earliest records of the settlement of the ancient city center - the area around the mineral springs of today's Central Mineral Bath - are from the Bronze Age (II millennium BC). Reports of this settlement are sparse as the city has continued to exist for thousands of years and many of the remains have been destroyed, but it remains uninterrupted to this day.
 
Let's not forget Varna, Bulgaria
 
I made a similar list for Europe years ago on Eupedia: Oldest European towns and cities by founding year.

I indicated the founding year, whether the place was still inhabited today or not, and marked in bold places that were now cities over 50,000 inhabitants.

They missed many cities in Europe older than Athens and still inhabited today: Plovdiv, Varna, Bratislava, Nitra, Huelva...
 

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